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High schools, club sports battling for kids

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High schools, club sports battling for kids

A few years ago, when asked what was the most important issue that needed to be addressed in high school sports, administrators and coaches singled out the proliferation of drugs, emphasis on transfers and the controversy over the PublicCatholicmultiplier debate.

Surprisingly, in a recent survey, those issues weren't even mentioned. Today, school officials are more concerned with the exploitation of high school athletes by colleges and shoe companies, the rise of individualism, over-publicizing of athletes by the media and influence of club sports.

"The biggest problem is maintaining perspective of the high school experience, when we don't get carried away with club teams and travel teams and spend thousands of dollars to go all over the country and get special training," said Marty Hickman, executive director of the Illinois High School Association.

"The high school experience is supposed to be fun and competitive and losing that perspective has caused those other problems, the proliferation of clubs and prep schools and the emphasis on college scholarships."

Jim Woodward of Anna-Jonesboro, president of the IHSA's board of directors, points out how club teams that once were only an issue in the Chicago area have spread throughout southern Illinois, not only in basketball but also volleyball, softball, baseball and soccer. In the Chicago area, tennis and gymnastics clubs also are wooing athletes away from their high school programs.

"About 15 years ago, I sat on a committee dealing with summer contact periods. At that time, 90 percent of the people were ready to shut down schools in the summer and let the kids be kids," Woodward said.

"Then southern Illinois schools said we need to do more for our coaches to keep the kids away from club sports and AAU coaches. We didn't have a problem in southern Illinois but we do now--and we have for the last few years.

"It used to be that we (the high schools) had the only ball in town. Now with all different club and AAU teams, they have pulled kids away and caused them to specialize in one sport. Parents are willing to spend a lot of money to move so their kids get more exposure, pay for personal trainers and play for elite clubs."

Woodward said the definition of high school sports is to sell sports as part of the curriculum or the educational process. "It is an extension of what we do in the day. But the summer people sell Division I scholarships and an opportunity to play at the next level and the level beyond that," he said.

"The emphasis is all about winning. We want to win in high school, too, but it isn't the main emphasis. We have created a monster. Kids don't want to sit on the bench anymore. Everybody in high school has a role, from the kid who averages 20 points per game to the kid who just plays in practice. High school sports help to prepare a kid for life."

Jim Prunty, athletic director at St. Ignatius and a member of the IHSA's legislative commission, also cites the "ever-growing conflict between club sports and interscholastic athletics in terms of how it is now spilling over into basketball, soccer and volleyball."

Prunty said players, not just elite players, are going to clubs to play a style that is not in conjunction with their high school program. "They pick up bad habits and change personality based on their experience at the club level," he said.

What is the solution to the problem? "Because it is financially better for college coaches to evaluate kids in the summer rather than when they play with their high school teams, the NCAA must limit contact between club coaches and college coaches. If it means eliminating contact altogether in the summer, I would be in favor of it," Prunty said.

"But it won't happen because it is easier for the NCAA to operate the way they do now. All club and travel programs are lumped into the same bag. But there are good people who teach the way we do. I am aware of it."

If something isn't done, however, Prunty fears for the future of high school sports. Parents have gotten out of control and specialization is ruining high school sports.

"Parents have club coaches fawning over their sons and daughters from an early age and expect that attention to be there throughout their careers. Yes, they are coddled, made to feel they are more important at an early age. That isn't healthy for kids," Prunty said.

"Specialization is part of the club dilemma. Kids are told if they play basketball and devote all their time, they can make it to the NBA. At St. Ignatius, we encourage kids to be multi-sport athletes. We have no inter-departmental struggles like other schools.

"But we're getting to the point--I hope I have to eat these words--that I wouldn't be shocked that in 15 to 20 years there are no more high school sports. Basketball, for example, will take a complete backseat to the AAU."

Steve Goers of Rockford Boylan and Gene Pingatore of St. Joseph, the two winningest boys basketball coaches in state history, are concerned by a rising lack of loyalty, increasing number of transfers and an emphasis on individualism, all influenced by the athletes' relationships with summer coaches and club sports.

"Individuals are putting themselves ahead of teams," Goers said. "For there to be team success, individuals have to put the team ahead of their personal success. They can't worry about their own accomplishments. You receive your due recognition based on how well the team will do.

"College coaches want to know if a kid is a team player, a good teammate, a good person. You read every day about kids being suspended for disciplinary or even more serious reasons and it jeopardizes the coach's job. There are so many more influences outside the coach and his staff today. It takes away from the idea that team is first. If a coach tries to discipline kids, they blame the coach rather than accept blame."

Pingatore is offended by the lack of loyalty displayed by many kids today, transferring from school to school. He blames the influence of the AAU. Twenty-five years ago, he said he had control of his program. That is no longer the case. Now he sees that many kids have better relationships with their summer coaches than their high school coaches.

"People move on a whim. It happens so much. We lost four starters on the football team. They went to programs where they felt they could win," he said. "Maybe this is the tip of the iceberg. Maybe the transfer thing is a sign of something else that isn't good in high school sports--outside influences.

"I don't know who is talking to my kids. I used to be in control of my program. Now I have to start all over again. I have to teach a kid all over again. I don't know who he is listening to, what someone is teaching him, who is telling kids to go to other schools.

"High schools need more control in all sports. The NCAA has control. They should talk about eliminating the summer evaluation period. Then AAU coaches can't say that kids have to follow them so they will get exposure to college coaches.

"Also, part of the problem is parents are obsessed with their kids getting Division I scholarships. They don't know how difficult it is. They fear if their kid doesn't go to a camp he will miss out. There are so many outside influences. High school coaches just don't have control as they once did."

Jim Antos, principal at Brother Rice and a member of the IHSA's legislative commission, has one issue that bothers him more than anything else--how local newspapers make kids feel they are a special class of citizen.

"It troubles me when kids think they can get away with things because they are athletes," Antos said. "I know kids should be covered (in the media) and people are making a living. But too much is being made of making kids untouchable. They are being turned into rock stars. If I could wave a magic wand, I would tell them: 'If a kid doesn't smile, don't put his picture in the paper.' It perpetuates an 'I'm too good for the world'
attitude that I really can't get my arms around."

Rams' trade for Jalen Ramsey will have a direct impact on Bears' season

Rams' trade for Jalen Ramsey will have a direct impact on Bears' season

The Los Angeles Rams pulled off a blockbuster trade for Jacksonville Jaguars CB Jalen Ramsey Tuesday night, sending two first-round picks (2020 and 2021) and a 2021 fourth-round pick for the superstar defender.

It's the second trade the Rams have accomplished in one day. Los Angeles shipped CB Marcus Peters to the Baltimore Ravens for LB Kenny Young and a 2020 fifth-round pick earlier on Tuesday, completing a makeover in their secondary that will have a direct impact the Chicago Bears this season.

The Bears travel to Los Angeles to face the Rams in Week 11 as part of a brutal five-game stretch coming off of their bye week. Ramsey makes it even worse.

The Rams had little choice but to pull off a mega-deal like this. They're entering Week 7 with the 19th ranked pass defense and an underwhelming 3-3 record, a far cry from the expectations for last year's Super Bowl runner-up.

Mitch Trubisky and the Bears offense will have their hands full on November 17. The combination of Aaron Donald on the defensive line and Ramsey in the secondary is as intimidating as any defensive duo in the NFL and is capable of destroying even the smartest and most efficient passing attacks. And that's not exactly Chicago's pass offense so far.

Trubisky, who's expected to return from a left shoulder injury Sunday against the Saints, hasn't proven this season that he's capable of staring down the barrel of a Donald-Ramsey alliance. It will be a ridiculously difficult challenge for a quarterback who's still finding his way as a pro.

Ramsey has missed the last three games for a variety of reasons, most of which appear as tricks to remain healthy in anticipation of a trade.  He's a two-time Pro Bowler and has nine interceptions from 2016-2018.

Now, Ramsey is an opponent on Chicago's 2019 schedule. 

Bold predictions for the Cubs' 2019-20 offseason

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USA TODAY

Bold predictions for the Cubs' 2019-20 offseason

The Cubs are just a couple of weeks away from a pivotal offseason that could see a lot of change coming to Chicago's North Side.

Then again, we thought the same thing a year ago and it turned out Theo Epstein's biggest move last winter was signing Daniel Descalso to a two-year deal.

But after missing the playoffs in 2019, the Cubs are now at a crossroads as an organization. 

The NBC Sports Chicago crew previewed the offseason on the latest CubsTalk Podcast with some bold predictions for the winter.

Listen here and check out the fearless calls below:

(Note: Rationale and more context on each bold prediction in the podcast.)

David Kaplan

1. Cubs are going to take a page out of the Yankees' book and retool on the fly rather than go all-in to contend in 2020.
2. Jose Quintana has thrown his last pitch as a Cub.
3. This will be the second-to-last offseason for Theo Epstein as the Cubs president of baseball operations.

Kelly Crull 

1. Cubs re-sign Nick Castellanos and trade away Kyle Schwarber.
2. Tyler Chatwood will be in the 2020 rotation.
3. John Lackey will be named quality assurance coach on David Ross's coaching staff. (Kidding, but only kind of...)

Tony Andracki

1. Before the Cubs play a Spring Training game, Javy Baez will sign an extension that will keep him in Chicago through at least 2023.
2. Willson Contreras will be traded this winter and the Cubs will get some much-needed pitching help in return.
3. Cubs sign Howie Kendrick this winter as the professional bat and lefty-masher they craved in 2019.
4. Ben Zobrist will return on a one-year deal and finish his playing career in a Cubs uniform.
5. David Bote, Albert Almora Jr. and Addison Russell will all be traded or non-tendered this winter as the Cubs remake their bench/depth.

Jeff Nelson

1. Willson Contreras will sign a contract extension.
2. Ben Zobrist will return as a player/coach.
3. Jose Quintana will be traded for minor league depth.
4. Terrance Gore will be signed to be the 26th man on the roster under the new rules.