Bulls

How Mariano Rivera became the greatest closer ever

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How Mariano Rivera became the greatest closer ever

Mike Borzello understands how Mariano Rivera is wired. Borzello knows that the money and the fame and the pressure never changed the bulletproof closer for the New York Yankees.

Borzello was there before Metallicas Enter Sandman became an anthem at Yankee Stadium. The Cubs staff assistant worked there for 12 seasons, primarily as a bullpen catcher, from 1996 through 2007, and took part in four World Series celebrations.

So Borzello had to be philosophical after hearing last week that Rivera collapsed onto the warning track at Kauffman Stadium and tore an ACL in his right knee.

Its difficult to think thats the way hes going to go out, Borzello said. But being with Mo for all those years, one thing he always did was shag in center field. It was the same every day and he used it as his conditioning. It was just an unfortunate thing that happened.

But we always used to joke that he was our best defensive center fielder.

The Cubs will have bullpen questions when they open a three-game series against the Milwaukee Brewers on Friday at Miller Park. Carlos Marmol has a 20 million contract, but no defined role other than be ready to pitch.

Kerry Wood was frustrated enough the other night to throw his glove and hat into the Wrigley Field seats. James Russell and Rafael Dolis appear to be taking over the endgame.

But its like that for just about every team in the majors. Relievers are notoriously difficult to project from one year to the next. Thats what made Rivera such an outlier as he piled up 608 career saves, plus 42 more in the postseason, where he has a 0.70 ERA.

Without the 42-year-old Rivera who just found out that he also has a blood clot in his right calf the Yankees wont be able to play an eight-inning game anymore. Like everyone else, they will have to deal with the uncertainty.

Answers can come out of nowhere. Borzello was there at Tiger Stadium in 1997 when that magical cutter revealed itself out of thin air. Rivera, a religious man, has compared it to divine intervention.

It just appeared, Borzello recalled. The first two years (of his career) he was just a four-seam fastballslider guy. (One) day he started warming up in Detroit (and) the first couple fastballs were cutting.

Hes throwing at the time back then 95 to 98 mph and the last few feet its cutting. And Im like: Whats going on? And then Im checking the ball and he doesnt know whats going on either.

So he switches balls and then finally hes just kind of worried, like: What is going on? I cant throw the ball straight.

Rivera wound up saving that game, but had no idea how it happened. He had been a long man and a setup guy for the Yankees as he broke into the big leagues. No one could have been thinking Hall of Fame at that point.

The man who would become the all-time saves leader was just trying to gain traction as a closer.

We came back the next day and its the same thing, Borzello said. Now hes really worried because he couldnt command it. Hes like: I dont know where its going. I can throw it at the plate, but I cant put it where I want.

It just kind of went from there. The rest is history, I guess. He learned how to basically locate it to both sides of the plate. He would elevate it. He could go at your hands if youre left-handed.

It just became this weapon that weve never seen before, and probably wont see again.

If that was a physical gift, Rivera was also blessed with the emotional intelligence to handle closing in New York.

When Wood was traded from the Cleveland Indians to the Yankees at the 2010 deadline, one of the things that struck him was the sense of calm in the bullpen.

(Rivera) knows how to slow the game down, Borzello said. Hes never going to rush. The games going to wait for him. Hes not going to change his routine to accommodate the game.

A lot of guys are like: Oh my God, I got to get ready, get down and theyre firing, firing. It just turns into chaos and it sometimes carries out into the game. It was never that way with him.

That mental toughness is essential. Rivera blew the save that allowed the Boston Red Sox to begin their epic comeback in 2004 and make Theo Epstein a legend throughout New England.

Rivera also shook off a Game 7 loss to Bob Brenlys Arizona Diamondbacks in an emotional World Series after 911.

It generated almost universal respect. Last summer at Wrigley Field, Marmol approached Rivera and asked him to autograph a jersey he wanted to frame and hang in his home in the Dominican Republic.

From Day 1 that I was ever with Mariano Rivera, from spring training in 96 until the last day I was with (the Yankees), he was the exact same, Borzello said. Youll see guys get nervous as the innings get later and its closer to their time. The phone rings and you see the nervousness or you see this antsy-ness about most guys.

Mariano was always just the most relaxed (guy), confident in what he knew he was capable of doing. He was that way from Day 1. It didnt take a lot of success, and then he became more comfortable. He was comfortable from Day 1. And it was fascinating to watch.

So Borzello has this sequence in his mind. It could have been bases loaded at Fenway Park, but it didnt really matter where the Yankees were playing.

Rivera would get up from his seat, grab his glove and lift a weighted ball. Rivera liked throwing three balls with Borzello standing up, and then would have the bullpen catcher crouch down to finish warming up his arm.

That sense of routine had the greatest closer of all-time running around during batting practice in Kansas City, just before the fall.

You cant tell people to stop being baseball players, Borzello said. If anyones going to come back from that, even at his age, it would be him. Hes in great shape and hell do whatever it takes. If he wants to continue playing, I dont doubt him at all.

Lauri Markkanen is focused on team, not individual, goals for Bulls

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USA Today

Lauri Markkanen is focused on team, not individual, goals for Bulls

You can’t put Lauri Markkanen in a box.

Just as you can’t pigeonhole one of the faces of the Bulls’ franchise offensively, you won’t get him to bite on any statistical goals for himself. As the outside world clamors for him and Zach LaVine to represent the Bulls at All-Star weekend in Chicago, Markkanen is focused on team goals.

“We haven’t made it to the playoffs and haven’t won many games since we’ve been here,” Markkanen said in an interview with NBC Sports Chicago following Saturday’s practice, alluding to himself, Zach LaVine and Kris Dunn. “That really bothers us. So we want to win first.”

In fact, as Markkanen fielded questions about a preseason that featured him playing more as a spot-up shooter than the dynamic, double-double machine that defined his February 2019, he shifted the focus to defense and rebounding.

Ho and hum, indeed.

“You’re trying to get me to say 22 (points) and 12 (rebounds) and 3 assists,” Markkanen said, smiling. “I don’t have those kinds of goals. I want to get our wins from 22 to whatever. And I want to get our home wins from nine to whatever. I’m not putting a number on those either. But I think guys are doing a good job of making unselfish plays and making the extra pass. We’re coming together as a team.”

In fact, Markkanen said, at least for now, his only individual goals are to “stay healthy and be consistent.” He reiterated his stance from media day that his goal is to play all 82 games after averaging 60 games his first two seasons.

“I wanted to focus on defense more this preseason and I was a little disappointed in myself in that regard early in preseason. But I watched a lot of film and I think I had my learning moments and I think I got better as preseason moved on,” Markkanen said. “I’ve talked to Coach. We both expect rebounding from me. I think we’re going to be really good offensively. It’s at a high level now, and we’re deeper. If we rebound and can limit their possessions, we have a chance to be really good.”

Don’t mistake Markkanen’s aversion to setting statistical goals for submissiveness. Early in the interview, he called his preseason “maybe not as great as I wanted to play” and acknowledged he needs to increase his free-throw attempts by getting to the rim more.

Of Markkanen’s 42 shots, 24 came from beyond the arc and he attempted just seven free throws in close to 91 preseason minutes. That average of 1.8 free-throw attempts in his four preseason games pales in comparison to the 3.8 he averaged last season.

“I haven’t got to the rim as much. I’m conscious of that. Those are easy points for us,” Markkanen said. “(Driving) is still available to me. But defenses are loading up on me more and trying not to let me get downhill. And we’re not in the post as much (offensively) as we used to be. We’re shooting a lot of 3s.”

Markkanen smiled again as he said this, so it’s clear he likes the Bulls’ approach. He also remains confident his varied offensive game will be on display at some point.

“I don’t always talk to him about his offense to be honest with you,” coach Jim Boylen said. “I talk to him about defending and rebounding and handling the ball. I’ve shown him some of his decisions in transition where he’s handled the ball.

“I want him to compete at the defensive end, rebound, handle the ball and everything else to me takes care of itself. I know he’s going to make shots. Historically, he’s been better when the lights come on.”

Those lights get flipped on for real Wednesday in Charlotte, N.C. You can’t put Markkanen in a box. But he can put pressure on himself to help the Bulls make the playoffs.

“I have really high expectations of myself,” he said. “That’s what keeps me going. I want to win."

Puppy Pick 'Em Puppy Walter makes his Week 7 picks for Bears-Saints

Puppy Pick 'Em Puppy Walter makes his Week 7 picks for Bears-Saints

When the Bears announced their 2019 schedule, we decided to have some puppies reveal the opponents. Now, we have taken it a step further. We have a puppy that will make weekly picks for the Bears games.

It is Week 7!

Walter's choices in Week 7 are a chance to go to Mardi Gras or a celebration of St. Patrick's day in Chicago. Bears fans should be excited about his decision in Week 7... and now we're all looking forward to St. Patrick's Day again!

The 12-week old dachshund was hand-selected by the scouts at NBC Sports Chicago and hails from One Tail at a Time rescue. He came from a shelter in Alabama and was transported to Chicago.  At just 7 weeks old and without his mom, he beat a deadly virus and spent some time in the doggie ER, where he healed and became strong again. 

Now, Walter is ready to rumble between the well-manicured lines of Sweetness Field. He is NOW adoptable via onetail.org and has two adorable sisters named Martha and Millie, who are already adopted. 

Walter will pick the games throughout the NFL season, including the playoffs and we hope that his nose follows the scent to the Bears every week, all the way to that magical game in Miami in February. Narrated by Jason Benetti, play-by-play announcer for the White Sox.  

It is time for Puppy Pick ‘Em presented by Nissan.

To learn more: www.onetail.org