Bears

Jeffery not placing the blame on refs

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Jeffery not placing the blame on refs

Alshon Jeffery said it over and over again after Sundays loss, how this is a physical game and he has to play accordingly.

Unfortunately on Sunday, Jeffery got penalized over and over for that physical play.

Jeffery was whistled for three offensive pass interferences, including one in the end zone, in the Chicago Bears 21-13 loss to the Green Bay Packers. It was a tough day for the rookie wide receiver, who was the Bears second-round pick (13th overall) in the 2012 NFL Draft. But Jeffery didnt think there was anything technically wrong with how he played.

I have to play physical. Thats the way the game is played, right? he said. My mindset going into the game is make the plays receivers making plays and stepping up. We knew they were going to try to be physical. We just tried to come and make plays.

At least one of those was questionable. And Jeffery got away with one early in the game when he grabbed Sam Shields by the facemask. But as far as the calls on him, Jeffery wasnt going to blame the officials.

Im going to have to go back and check the film and see, he said. Im not going to put it all on their side.

Packers cornerback Shields agreed with all of them.

It was perfect. It's hard to get them called. We got them and they gave us some good time to get off the field, he said.

Teammate Tramon Williams agreed.

Its unheard of, but its correct, he said. Hopefully we get more refs to do that.

Coach Lovie Smith said hes never seen three in a game before.

When you look at our history, we havent gotten a lot of them. So all of them were really big plays, he said. Normally you get a call that goes your way, but we had a lot of opportunities and thats how the officials saw it.

Two were very big. The first nullified a 1-yard touchdown pass. The second, with the Bears trailing 21-13, nixed a potential 36-yard reception with less than three minutes remaining in the game.

Quarterback Jay Cutler wasnt getting into the what-waswasnt-a-penalty discussion.

I dont think anyone wants to get fined, first of all. Secondly, thats not what lost us the game, he said.

But a few minutes later, Cutler was asked if veteran receivers can get away with more than young guys like Jeffery.

Bump and run and press they let him play early on and then started calling it later. I dont know for what reason. Alshons a big receiver and whenever he bumps a guy the guys going to move, Cutler said. Im at a loss for this question. Youre baiting me into things and Im not going to fall for it.

Jeffery had a tough day. He plays a physical game, and hes not planning on changing that anytime soon.

Thats the way the game is played, he said.

Bears eye position changes in search for improved depth on offense

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USA Today

Bears eye position changes in search for improved depth on offense

The Bears will try to address one of their more glaring weaknesses — tight end depth — by giving longtime offensive tackle Bradley Sowell some work at tight end in the coming weeks of practice at Halas Hall. 

Sowell, a reliable backup swing tackle the last two seasons with the Bears, was targeted twice as a receiver in 2018 — first, on a nearly-intercepted Mitch Trubisky pass against the New England Patriots, and second on the famous “Santa’s Sleigh” touchdown against the Los Angeles Rams. He also got some work as a fullback in the Bears’ Week 17 thumping of the Minnesota Vikings. 

“We felt like at the ‘Y’ position we could use some more depth,” coach Matt Nagy said. “It’s something we talked about at the end of the season. We discussed it and now we’re giving him a chance.”

Nagy’s assessment of the Bears’ “Y” (in-line) depth is accurate, if not even undersold. The athletic 6-foot-7, 312 pound Sowell will have a chance to be a backup to Adam Shaheen, who has missed 13 games in his first two years due to a string of injuries. Reserve tight end Ben Braunecker can play both the “Y” and “U” positions, and the Bears have a handful of undrafted free agents (led by Utah State's Dax Raymond) competing to catch the eye of the coaching staff in the coming weeks. 

The Bears’ offense struggled with two tight ends on the field last year, especially in Shaheen’s absence as Dion Sims played himself out of the league. It’s far too early to tell if adding Sowell to the tight end mix will help, but at this point, the Bears think it’s worth a shot. 

“He’s shown it repetitively in practice that he has the athletic ability, the hands, he’s very smart, he knows how to block and all that stuff,” Nagy said. “So let’s test it out and see. When I tell you he’s all-in, he’s all-in.”

Center of Attention

As expected, the Bears indeed will flip James Daniels and Cody Whitehair on the offensive line, with Daniels sliding to center and Whitehair to left guard. 

“We feel comfortable with it, so again, this is the time to test it out and see,” Nagy said. “It’s hard right now because we don’t have pads. So, we’ll get into training camp and see how that goes. But I feel pretty good about it.”

Daniels exclusively played left guard during last year’s regular season, with the Bears opting to hold steady with Whitehair at center for the third consecutive season. Whitehair, though, was drafted as a guard back in 2016 and only moved to center after the last-minute signing of Pro Bowl guard Josh Sitton. Daniels, too, starred as a center at Iowa and did get a smattering of preseason snaps there before fully committing to playing guard his rookie year. 

The change is the only planned one on Harry Hiestand’s offensive line, which returns every primary starter from 2018 (Daniels, Whitehair, Charles Leno, Bobby Massie, Kyle Long). Perhaps the most significant change for this group, then, will be losing Sowell as its backup tackle. 

Windy City: Smoke Out?

Taquan Mizzell will work as a wide receiver during OTAs, with the now-former running back trading in No. 33 for No. 11 but facing an uphill battle to make the Bears’ roster. 

Mizzell does have a decent track record as a pass-catcher dating back to his college days at Virginia, but it’ll take a massive effort for the third-year player to crack into a crowded receiver room that already has a competitive battle brewing between Javon Wims, Marvin Hall and a group of undrafted free agents. 

While it’s too early to grant rookie running back Kerrith Whyte Jr. a roster spot, shifting Mizzell out of the picture does appear to create a clearer path for the seventh-round pick to stick with the Bears this fall. 

Countdown to the NBA Draft: The best all-time selection at picks 1-30

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USA TODAY

Countdown to the NBA Draft: The best all-time selection at picks 1-30

We're counting down the days until the NBA Draft by looking at the best players selected at No. 30, 29, 28 all the way down to No. 1. Check back every day leading up to June 20th for a new player and a new all-time best pick.

No. 30: Jimmy Butler

No. 29: 5/23
No. 28: 5/24
No. 27: 5/25
No. 26: 5/26
No. 25: 5/27
No. 24: 5/28
No. 23: 5/29
No. 22: 5/30
No. 21: 5/31
No. 20: 6/1
No. 19: 6/2
No. 18: 6/3
No. 17: 6/4
No. 16: 6/5
No. 15: 6/6
No. 14: 6/7
No. 13: 6/8
No. 12: 6/9
No. 11: 6/10
No. 10: 6/11
No. 9: 6/12
No. 8: 6/13
No. 7: 6/14
No. 6: 6/15
No. 5: 6/16
No. 4: 6/17
No. 3: 6/18
No. 2: 6/19
No. 1: 6/20