Bears

Kap: Hoyer, Cubs may have struck gold with Almora

782362.png

Kap: Hoyer, Cubs may have struck gold with Almora

A journey of a 1,000 miles starts with one step or one pick if youre a Cubs fan. Theo Epstein, along with the rest of the Cubs front office, took that step on Monday by selecting 18-year-old outfielder Albert Almora with the sixth-overall pick in the MLB draft.

Almora, a senior out of Hialeah Gardens Mater Academy in Hialeah, Fla. was the first pick on a long road to recovery for Theo and company. Almora proved to Cubs management that he was worthy of their confidence in a number of ways. In his senior season he hit .603 with six home runs, 34 RBIs, 24 stolen bases and only struck out three times in 87 plate appearances. Almora has been a starter on the varsity team since eighth grade and has always been mature beyond his years.

But Almoras accolades do not stop at the high school level. He has been a member of Team USAs 18 and under squad for a number of years where he won five gold medals. Epstein and general manager Jed Hoyer are not the only ones who saw potential in Almora. Baseball America ranked him the No. 2 outfielder, No. 3 high school player and No. 1 defensive high school player in this years draft.

Almora is a slender 6-foot-2, 172-pound teenager who has yet to fill out his frame. This is exactly the high-ceiling type player the Cubs were in search of coming into the draft. Almora has shown average speed and an above average arm and he makes superb reads in the outfield. His precise routes to the ball and ability to react on contact help make up for his average speed and allow him to cover good ground in center field. His throwing mechanics are well polished giving him above average accuracy. Scouts say that Almora has a professional approach at the plate which is rare for a high school player. That approach and above average bat speed give the slender teen surprising power.

Obviously, Almora is only 18 so he has a good amount of time and growth before we can even think of him as an everyday possibility at Wrigley Field but he is the type of athlete and personality Theo wants to build the future around. Almora is widely known for his work ethic which is something Epstein and Hoyer have been known to look for in addition to raw talent. They have a proven track record when it comes to drafting this type of athlete with past successes in Dustin Pedroia, Jacoby Ellsbury, and Jonathan Papelbon.

Almora also possess the type of intelligence Cubs management is looking for. He is a heady player on the field and has a 4.1 GPA in the classroom. The dynamic duo has a tendency of spending their first-round picks on college players, so for them to pull the trigger on this high schooler is a credit to both his maturity of character and ability.

When asked about Almora Hoyer said, in terms of the morals that he carries with himself every day, the work ethic, whats important to Albert Almora, certainly those are things that appeal to us. We felt this kid was going to get the absolute best out of his ability. Competing was important to him. Winning was important to him. Being a great teammate was important to him. Combine that with the history that we have and the knowledge that our scouts have of him and he really checked all the boxes.

There are few drawbacks to this pick other than a big leg kick and some moving parts to his swing, but he makes them work to his advantage. Although projected first overall pick Mark Appel fell down the board all the way to eight and became an option, this was exactly the type of move the Cubs organization needed to make in the early stages of rebuilding.
Your browser does not support iframes.

Joe Musso contributed to this article.

NFC North standings: Bears fall to last in division with Week 7 loss to Patriots

lorin_bears_pats.jpg
USA TODAY

NFC North standings: Bears fall to last in division with Week 7 loss to Patriots

The great Ricky Bobby once said, “If you ain’t first, you’re last.” Talladega Nights hit a little too close to home for the Bears in Week 7.

They came into Sunday at 3-2 at the top of the NFC North. After a 38-31 loss to the New England Patriots, they dropped to the bottom of the division.

The Detroit Lions defeated the Miami Dolphins 32-21 to improve to 3-3, leaving them tied with the Bears in the cellar.

The Minnesota Vikings’ 37-17 victory over the New York Jets jumped them to 4-2-1 overall and first place in the division over the 3-2-1 Green Bay Packers, who were off for their bye week.

The NFC North remains the most tightly contested division in the NFL, the only one with no teams under .500 through seven weeks of the season.

The final standings may not be decided until Week 17, and the Bears have already blown the early season cushion they built for themselves while the Vikings and Packers were struggling.

The divisional action will pick up in November, and Chicago only has a pair of games left to put it all together before back-to-back-to-back games against the Lions, Vikings and Lions again.    

Under Center Podcast: Bears lose 38-31 to the Patriots

under_center_pod_patriots.jpg
USA TODAY

Under Center Podcast: Bears lose 38-31 to the Patriots

Matt Forte, Lance Briggs and Alex Brown join Laurence Holmes to break down the Bears 38-31 loss to the Patriots. What happened to the Bears defense over their bye week, and how did the special teams struggle so bad against New England? Plus – the guys debate Mitchell Trubisky’s decision making in the red zone and Matt weighs in on how the Bears should play his former team – the New York Jets – next week.

0:35– Special teams to blame for loss?

4:12– Where did the Bears pass rush go? 

5:27– Bad tackling followed Bears from Miami

7:25– Are the coaches to blame for the defense after the bye?

10:10– Evaluating Mitchell Trubisky’s game

11:55– Agree with Matt Nagy on Mitch’s “mental” game?

13:30– Trubisky’s red zone decision making

17:10– Are the Bears giving away games so Mitch can learn?

18:00– Bears need to run the ball more

21:04– Matt Forte scouts his former team, the New York Jets

Listen to the full podcast here or in the embedded player below.

Subscribe: