White Sox

Kings' move to Seattle is all but a done deal

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Kings' move to Seattle is all but a done deal

From Comcast SportsNetThe only thing stopping the Sacramento Kings from a sale and move to Seattle is approval by NBA owners.The Maloof family has agreed to sell the Kings to a Seattle group led by investor Chris Hansen, two people familiar with the decision said Sunday night. The people spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the deal is still pending approval from the NBA Board of Governors.One person said Hansen's group will buy 65 percent of the franchise for 525 million, move the team to Seattle and restore the SuperSonics name. The Maloofs will have no stake in the team.The sale figure is a total valuation of the franchise, which includes relocation fees. Hansen's group also is hoping to buy out other minority investors.The Maloofs will receive a 30 million non-refundable deposit Feb. 1, according to the deal, one person said. They will still be allowed to receive other offers until the league approves the sale.Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson said last week he had received permission from NBA Commissioner David Stern to present a counteroffer to league owners from buyers who would keep the Kings in Sacramento.The plan by Hansen's group is to have the team play at least the next two seasons in KeyArena before moving into a new facility in downtown Seattle. The deadline for teams to apply for a move for the next season is March 1.Johnson said in a statement late Sunday night that the city remains undeterred despite the agreement with the Seattle group."Sacramento has proven that it is a strong NBA market with a fan base that year in and year out has demonstrated a commitment to the Kings by selling out 19 of 27 seasons in a top 20 market and owning two of the longest sellout streaks in NBA history," Johnson said."When it comes to keeping the team in our community, Sacramento is playing to win. In particular, we have been focused like a laser on identifying an ownership group that will both have the financial resources desired by the NBA and the vision to make the Kings the NBA equivalent of what the Green Bay Packers have been in the NFL."In a saga that has dragged on for nearly three years, Johnson and Sacramento appear to be facing their most daunting challenge yet.Hansen, a Seattle native and San Francisco-based investor, reached agreement with local governments in Seattle last October on plans to build a 490 million arena near the city's other stadiums, CenturyLink Field and Safeco Field.As part of the agreement, no construction will begin until all environmental reviews are completed and a team has been secured.Hansen's group is expected to pitch in 290 million in private investment toward the arena, along with helping to pay for transportation improvements in the area around the stadiums.The plans also call for the arena to be able to handle a future NHL franchise.The remaining 200 million in public financing would be paid back with rent money and admissions taxes from the arena, and if that money falls short, Hansen would be responsible for making up the rest.Other investors in the proposed arena include Microsoft Chief Executive Steve Ballmer and two members of the Nordstrom department store family.Hansen's goal has been to return the SuperSonics to the Puget Sound after they were moved from Seattle to Oklahoma City in 2008.Asked in September if he could envision a team being in Seattle for the 2013 season, Hansen was cautious about finding an option that quickly.The Kings' sale price would top the NBA-record 450 million the Golden State Warriors sold for in July 2010.Brothers Joe, Gavin and George Maloof bought controlling interests in the franchise from Los Angeles-based developer Jim Thomas in 1999. The Maloofs, who have long waited for an upgrade to the team's outdated arena, backed out of a tentative 391 million deal for a new downtown building with Sacramento last year, reigniting fears the franchise could relocate.Johnson and the Kings broke off all negotiations in the summer with the team's owners, who said the deal didn't make financial sense for the franchise.In 2011, the Kings appeared determined to move to Anaheim before Johnson convinced the NBA to give the city one last chance to help finance an arena.At one point, Johnson seemed so certain the team was gone he called the process a "slow death" and compared the city's efforts to keep the Kings a "Hail Mary."Johnson made a pitch to the NBA Board of Governors in April 2011, promising league owners the city would find a way to help finance a new arena to replace the team's current outdated suburban facility. That pitch bought the Kings time, before the brokered deal between the city and the Maloofs fell apart last year.

Michael Kopech's 2020 absence won't sink deep White Sox pitching staff

Michael Kopech's 2020 absence won't sink deep White Sox pitching staff

Are the White Sox better off with Michael Kopech? Obviously.

Are they sunk without him? Not in 2020, they're not.

Kopech won't play this year missing a second straight full season after he spent 2019 recovering from Tommy John surgery. But it's a credit to Rick Hahn's rebuilding effort that even without one of the organization's highest profile youngsters, the news wasn't met with sky-is-falling panic.

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The White Sox have spent much of "Summer Camp," both before and after Kopech's decision was announced Friday night, talking about pitching depth. And indeed, the team did reap a kind of benefit from the months-long layoff during which baseball watched the COVID-19 pandemic and slogged through fruitless negotiations. Several of the team's young pitchers on the mend from Tommy John are now full-season options for a shortened 60-game season instead of the midseason additions they were scheduled to be in a 162-game campaign.

Kopech was slated to be among them, probably due to start a normal season in the minor leagues, even if he was healthy enough to light up the radar gun during his lone inning of Cactus League action prior to spring training's abrupt end. The White Sox have to this point cited only "personal reasons" as the explanation for Kopech's decision not to participate this year. Whether those reasons are tied to health concerns over COVID-19, which has caused several other players around the league to sit out, or health concerns over his surgically repaired elbow, the case according to a couple different reports, or something different altogether remains to be publicly addressed.

Considering that it was a mystery what kind of pitcher Kopech was going to be after a more than yearlong recovery period, a halted spring, a months-long layoff and now a brief three-week ramp-up period ahead of a 60-game dash to the postseason added a ton more mystery about how his arm would have responded.

And adding more mystery still was an uncertain role for the 24-year-old flamethrower. Might he have ended up in an expanded starting rotation, where the White Sox see him pitching for years to come? Might he have been used as a multi-inning relief option in this shortened season? Might he and his triple-digit fire have been deployed in the later innings? All seemed possible.

What's not quite as mysterious is the shape of the White Sox pitching staff without Kopech. Yes, he would have made it even stronger. But there's a lot that remains, including a bolstered rotation and a reliable bullpen, that still seems capable of teaming with a remade lineup to truly threaten the Minnesota Twins and Cleveland Indians for divisional supremacy in the AL Central. It's a deep group of arms that gives Rick Renteria a bunch of options.

Renteria's decision-making process, however, might now get a little easier without the Kopech factor, and a six-man rotation could be the most logical setup when Opening Day rolls around in a little less than two weeks. As mentioned, the layoff allowed several other non-Kopech arms to recover from their own procedures. Most notable among them is Carlos Rodón, who could easily be tacked onto the end of the starting five the White Sox were expected to break camp with back in March: Lucas Giolito, Dallas Keuchel, Dylan Cease, Reynaldo López and Gio González. Behind them, now healthy pitching prospects Dane Dunning and Jimmy Lambert could extend the starter pool to eight.

"It’s tough losing Kopech, great arm, be nice to see him throw," Rodón said Saturday, "but we have some experience on our side with Gio González, and (Giolito) coming off an All-Star season. We have some young arms, we can do some mixing and matching. We have some depth, and we can be very good."

RELATED: What Michael Kopech skipping season means for White Sox in 2020 and beyond

Giolito is fresh off his remarkable All-Star campaign from a season ago and enters this one as the no-doubt ace of the South Side staff, even if he's dreaming of a perfect world where every hurler in the rotation has the "ace" moniker. The arrival of the accomplished veteran Keuchel makes for a reliable top of the rotation.

It's Cease and López where the biggest question marks exist, and what they do this season could determine how high the White Sox are able to leap while looking to exit rebuilding mode and enter contending mode. Cease's nasty-looking numbers from 2019 can be chalked up to him dipping his toes into major league waters for the first time. López, though, seemed to trade places with Giolito, sliding from the team's best starter in 2018 to a woeful 2019. For all the promising discussion of the work he's done on the mental side of his game, the results didn't look all that dissimilar during Saturday's intrasquad game, when he allowed a pair of home runs. Though it's important to remember that the same stop-and-start schedule that might have led Kopech to stay away from the season altogether applies to every pitcher still participating in it, and expecting the best, especially from the jump, might be asking too much.

On top of the challenges facing all pitchers, González also has a springtime injury in the rear-view mirror. His first intrasquad effort Sunday featured the first three hitters reaching base — the second and third via the walk — and the first two of them scoring on Yermin Mercedes' two-run single. Andrew Vaughn tagged him for a home run later in his three innings. But even if the White Sox don't get the kind of results that sent González to the All-Star Game in back-to-back seasons the better part of a decade ago, they'll benefit from his veteran presence and winning experience, both on and off the field.

Rodón looked good in his first intrasquad performance Saturday, even if he was the victim of Luis Robert's ridiculous falling-down home run. Dunning looked very good when he pitched Sunday.

Now, as Allen Iverson said, we talkin' 'bout practice, and a small sample size of it, at that. But merely looking at the starting pitching on this team, there's a volume of options that can often separate the winners from the losers. Just look to last year's White Sox group, which struggled to plug the hole Rodón vacated throughout the remainder of the season. While there's no guaranteeing performance, it wouldn't be much of a stretch to suggest White Sox fans can forget about seeing the likes of Ervin Santana and Odrisamer Despaigne again. Even the plug-in options are attractive now, which of course is the idea when building a contender.

"We've got some young guys that are filling the spots," González said Sunday. "Mike is huge for this organization, he's huge for the clubhouse. Obviously it's his decision, and we respect him 100 percent. I wish I would have had an opportunity to play with him a little bit more, but I get it.

"It's respect for him and his family, but we've got to focus on people who are here, and I think that after watching Dunning pitch, some of the guys coming in showing their stuff, it's pretty exciting to see there are guys who are going to try to step up and do their part and make it a deal to be recognized in this organization and try to earn their spot here."

RELATED: Luis Robert's legend grows, suggesting White Sox should ready for superstardom

In the bullpen, meanwhile, the White Sox won't have Kopech to use in any potentially gadgety ways. But the group down there looks promising, too, especially now with the proven commodity that is Steve Cishek lengthening a back end that already included Alex Colomé and Aaron Bummer. Evan Marshall and Jimmy Cordero — and should the much discussed bounce back materialize, Kelvin Herrera — are still there, too, though Hahn will be among the first to warn of the unbankability of relief pitching from one season to the next. But in a season when the White Sox lost 89 games, the bullpen was a strength. Returning that same cast of characters and adding Cishek, who did such a good job for the Cubs in recent seasons, provides plenty of confidence that it can be a strength again.

And so it's quite understandable why White Sox fans didn't stamp the 2020 season with a July 10 expiration date upon news of Kopech's decision. That rundown of the vast amount of pitching on this roster does way more than just keep hope afloat, it is an engine for said hope. Of course, there's a remade lineup for White Sox fans to salivate over, too, and on a list of reasons for excitement this season, the injection of Yasmani Grandal and Edwin Encarnación into the middle of the order surely ranks higher than Marshall and Cordero facing less pressure.

When taking a longer view, the answer becomes different. Kopech is more important to White Sox teams in 2021 and beyond than he is to this year's squad. And so if there is worry to be had, it's over what two full missed seasons means for Kopech's readiness then. There was plenty of question about what he'd look like after missing 2019, and that question mark gets bolded, italicized and underlined — the type-formatting Holy Trinity — when it comes to what he'll look like after missing 2020, too.

But when it comes to this season, specifically, the Jenga tower that is a Major League Baseball team is nowhere near collapse because the Kopech block has been removed. And Hahn did such a job constructing this thing that no one even seemed worried such a thing might happen.

There are plenty of blocks left in the stack. Now it's on them to show how much weight they can bear.


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Yu Darvish: If Cubs didn't take COVID-19 seriously, 'I was ready to go home'

Yu Darvish: If Cubs didn't take COVID-19 seriously, 'I was ready to go home'

If Yu Darvish thinks baseball can pull off this high-risk, three-month season during a pandemic, maybe there’s reason to dream on the long shot coming in.

Then, again, the Cubs’ potential Opening Day starter has not ruled out changing his mind about playing — which underscores the daily fragility of the thread holding this 30-team, 30-site process together.

“Definitely, I came here to make sure everybody’s doing the right thing,” Darvish said through a translator. “I had in my mind if they’re not, I was ready to go home.”

Darvish was the first player in the majors last spring to publicly express fear of the COVID-19 spread and lethality of a virus that was blamed for fewer than 10 American deaths at the time — weeks before major sports were shut down across the country.

Four months and more than 130,000 U.S. coronavirus-related deaths later, he made the “tough” decision to play — with plenty of reservations.

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“Yes, definitely, I still have concerns,” he said Sunday, two days after Giants star Buster Posey became one of 11 players without a pre-existing, high-risk condition to decline to play this season.

MORE: Tracking MLB players who have opted out or declined to play in 2020

Under rules in the COVID-19 health and safety Operations Manual, players with high-risk conditions are allowed to change their minds in either direction when it comes to the opt-out decision. And they earn full service time for the year and prorated salary for the 60-game season if they don’t play.

Those such as Darvish who are not in that category don’t get service time or pay for the year if they decline to play and are not allowed to return once that decision is made official.

Asked if he still is leaving open the possibility of opting out of the season, he said, “Maybe. But at this point no, I don’t think so.”

In a baseball vacuum, Darvish offers the Cubs’ their best chance to have success during a 60-game season and any playoffs that might follow.

“The way he finished the season last year, how good he was for us, that’s the guy we’re counting on,” manager David Ross said, referring to a second half that included a 2.76 ERA and a 118-to-7 strikeout-to-walk ratio in 13 starts.

But Darvish, a native of Japan, hasn’t viewed baseball in a vacuum since the year began — approaching Cubs officials upon his arrival for informal work before spring training began in February to address concerns about reporters who might travel from possible virus hot spots in Asia to cover him.

“I’m really worried about it,” he said then.

And then on March 5 he left the Cubs’ spring facility to see a doctor for a test after experiencing a cough, out of a fear he might expose teammates if he had the virus.

By the time MLB and the union agreed last month to terms for a season, the thought of playing during a pandemic had only become more serious for Darvish and many others throughout the game.

“It was tough because I have small children,” Darvish said of the decision. “During the spring we had a lot of thoughts about that, and it was tough decision.”

He said seeing teammates with similar family dynamics and concerns choose to play made it “a little easier to make the decision to play.”

But it’s a discussion among players and their families across the majors that isn’t going to go away — and figures to only intensify every time another batch of test results shows up late or another player tests positive somewhere.

MORE: Cubs COVID-19 tests return negative, Theo Epstein cautions against complacency

Not to mention continued spikes in new cases and deaths in cities and states across the major-league map.

“I think we’re all a little nervous. Nobody wants to get this thing,” Cubs veteran Jon Lester said. “You have to just believe in the testing process; you have to believe in kind of the bubble community we’re trying to create here; you have to believe in these things.”

That’s when Lester held up a mask during the Zoom session with reporters.

The Cubs — the only team in the league without a player testing positive through the first two weeks of intake and monitoring testing — have shown a commitment to safety protocols from top to bottom in the organization. Third baseman Kris Bryant wore his mask again while taking ground balls at third base Sunday, despite plenty of safe distance from the nearest player or coach.

“I know that some of the players are uncomfortable wearing it, but they do wear it,” Darvish said. “So it’s nice to see. I used to wear [masks] all the time in Japan so I’m very comfortable with this.”

Getting comfortable with the larger experiment, especially when teams begin to travel and inherent risks increase, could be an ongoing adjustment — for everyone from
Darvish, Lester and Bryant to Angels superstar Mike Trout, who continues to express concerns with his first child due next month.

“There’s a lot of stuff where you’re putting yourself out there and just kind of hoping,” said Lester, whose successful battle with cancer more than a decade ago qualifies him for a high-risk exemption to opt out.

“My own personal health really wasn’t my concern,” said Lester, who said the team doctor consulted with his oncologist in Chicago on the issue. “We do have some family stuff we’re trying to stay away from. But I think you just have to dive into this head-first and go with the protocols and wash your hands and be careful.

“You really have to concentrate on that and hopefully everything else kind of takes care of itself.”

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