White Sox

Knicks shoot the lights out in win over Celtics

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Knicks shoot the lights out in win over Celtics

From Comcast SportsNetNEW YORK (AP) -- As the Celtics staggered to the locker room after getting hit by an NBA record-tying 3-point assault, the halftime musical selection perfectly summed up how they must have felt.It was "You Dropped a Bomb on Me" -- and Carmelo Anthony and two sharpshooting subs sure did.Anthony had 35 points, 12 rebounds and 10 assists for his second career triple-double, and the New York Knicks made 19 3-pointers to keep alive their Atlantic Division title hopes with a 118-110 victory over Boston on Tuesday night.JR Smith and Steve Novak both scored 25 points for the Knicks, who overcame a season-high 43 points from Paul Pierce and moved into sole possession of seventh place in the Eastern Conference while trimming Boston's division lead to 3 games.Novak hit eight 3s in the highest-scoring game of his career. Smith made all seven of his 3s in the first half, equaling a team record."Our bench was great tonight," Anthony said. "Novak and JR, them guys combined for 50 points off the bench. When they get hot like that, it's hard to deal with."The Celtics would have wrapped up their fifth straight Atlantic title with a victory. Instead, the Knicks stunned them with a record-tying 14 3-pointers in a 72-point first half and equaled their season high by finishing 19 of 32 behind the arc. They improved to 14-5 under interim coach Mike Woodson.Tyson Chandler had 20 points on 9-of-10 shooting for the Knicks, who finished one short of their franchise record for 3s, set last season."We didn't defend the 3 at all tonight," Pierce said. "We dug ourselves a huge hole that we couldn't climb out of."Kevin Garnett scored 20 points for the Celtics, who fell out of a three-way tie for fourth in the East with Atlanta and Orlando. Rajon Rondo had 13 points and 13 assists.The Celtics watched Anthony score 42 points in a losing effort against Miami on Sunday and apparently overreacted to it, trying so hard to get the ball out of his hands that they didn't pay enough attention to his supporting cast."We panicked," Boston coach Doc Rivers said. "We trapped too early. We were doing things that we shouldn't have done. It happens. We talked about it at halftime. I thought we were better at it and then we did it again in the fourth quarter out of nowhere. Good lesson though. I told our guys it was a really good lesson for us: Don't overreact to one great player and I thought we did that."Playing without the injured Ray Allen, the Celtics got a brief scare in the third quarter when Rondo landed hard on his back going for a rebound and remained on the court for a few minutes while being attended to before remaining in the game.Woodson has repeatedly said the division title was his goal, even though the Knicks' 18-24 record when he took over always made that unlikely. Rivers said he's never talked to the Celtics about winning a division title or congratulated them for doing so, but there's no doubt it's worth having this season. Division winners are guaranteed to be seeded no worse than No. 4, avoiding Chicago or Miami until at least the second round.Allen missed his fifth straight game when he felt pain in his right ankle Tuesday morning. He had gone through the morning shootaround and Rivers assumed he was set to play before the pain returned. Neither was sure if Allen would play Wednesday against Orlando.Allen, the NBA's career leader in 3-pointers made, would have fit in perfectly in this game.The Celtics jumped to an 8-2 lead, but the rest of the first half belonged to the Knicks. New York scored the final 10 points of the first quarter, going up 32-26 behind 12 points from Anthony and 63 percent shooting.The Knicks then scored eight straight points to open the second quarter, capping an 18-0 run when Smith's 3-pointer made it 40-26 with 9:16 left. Consecutive 3s by Mike Bibby and Smith later made it 54-35 midway through the second, and the lead reached 20 points when Novak was fouled while making a 25-footer, falling backward out of bounds and into the arms of Woodson -- the only time anyone got near a Knicks shooter in the half.Novak hit two more before halftime, the Knicks taking a 72-53 lead into the locker room. He is shooting an NBA-best 47.2 percent from behind the arc."He's the best 3-point shooter in our league by far. I mean it's not even close," Smith said. "The guy's shooting 50-something percent from 3, so people are starting to catch onto it but not fast enough."Pierce, who was 17 of 18 from the free throw line, had 17 points in the third quarter to get the Celtics back into it, and the Knicks led 96-84 after three.The Celtics finally got within single digits late in the game, with Pierce scoring four straight to cut it to 112-106 with 3:07 left. But Novak hit two 3-pointers around a jumper by Rondo, putting it away at 118-108.Notes: Woodson said Amare Stoudemire could return Friday at Cleveland. He hasn't played since March 24 because of a bulging disk in his back. ... The Celtics played without swingman Mickael Pietrus, who was sent back to Boston with knee pain that Rivers assumed was caused by playing on three straight nights after a lengthy absence with a head injury. ... The Knicks play their next three on the road and have just one home game remaining, next Wednesday against the Los Angeles Clippers. ... The Celtics finished 1-6 this season on the road against division rivals. ... Milwaukee also hit 14 3-pointers in a half in 2006.

The White Sox see the light at the end of the rebuilding tunnel

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USA TODAY

The White Sox see the light at the end of the rebuilding tunnel

LAS VEGAS — Things are undoubtedly changing for the White Sox.

These aren't last year's Winter Meetings, where general manager Rick Hahn preached patience and was just a month away from declaring 2018 the toughest part of the team's rebuilding process. These are a different kind of Winter Meetings, where the White Sox are reportedly in on Bryce Harper, in on Manny Machado and cranking up the aggressiveness on the heels of a 100-loss season.

Make no mistake, though, despite all these rumors tying them to baseball's best players, the rebuild is still in full swing. But it's because of the progress they've seen in that rebuilding process that the White Sox feel so confident in being aggressive this winter. Hahn is confident his sales pitch to the Harpers and Machados of the baseball world — of course, he won't mention their names, specifically, in his chats with reporters — is a winning one: Join this team and within a few years, all that minor league talent will grow up around you and this will be a perennial championship contender.

It's not a reaction to 2018's ugly win-loss record. This isn't desperation. This was all part of the plan, to lure top free agents to the South Side with the promise of future success. As Hahn said last month at the GM Meetings, no one should be surprised to hear the White Sox linked to these elite players. The reason? The team is seeing the light at the end of this rebuilding tunnel.

To Hahn, that means that the wave of prospects he envisions washing up at Guaranteed Rate Field is getting closer. Eloy Jimenez figures to be with the major league team a few weeks into the 2019 season. Dylan Cease could be on the same path Michael Kopech was in 2018 and possibly arrive even earlier in the calendar than Kopech did. The catching tandem of the future could be knocking on the door at Triple-A Charlotte, and the bulk of talent that made Class A Winston-Salem so intriguing in 2018 could have the same effect at Double-A Birmingham in 2019.

Progress. It might not be the first thought in White Sox fans' heads as their favorite team keeps getting linked to Harper and Machado. But without that progress in the minor league system, there might not be as much aggressiveness. In other words, it's a heck of a lot easier to sell a future that you're able to see coming.

"Talking about the light at the end of the tunnel means that we're starting to see some guys get to the Double-A level and above that are going to help us in the not so distant future," Hahn explained Monday night. "Obviously we've promoted guys from Double-A before, so once they're there, they're established.

"You're starting to see a team where not only next year will you have obviously (Yoan) Moncada, (Tim Anderson) and (Reynaldo Lopez) and a full year of (Carlos) Rodon — knock on wood — but you're going to see, in all probability, Eloy Jimenez at some point and Dylan Cease. And then you're going to have at Triple-A (Zack) Collins and (Seby) Zavala. And you're going to have at Double-A a prospect-laden Birmingham team, any of number of whom could factor in, conceivably, at some point in the 2019 season. Might not. We're not going to rush this thing. We're going to let them, give them all the time they need where they're to the point where they're ready to succeed in Chicago. But they're in shouting distance.

"It's starting to get a little bit closer. We're not going to move it artificially. That's the way we can mess this thing up, to start rushing some guys or start making some shortsighted commitments that compromise our flexibility in the future, but it's getting closer."

Perhaps it's easy to play devil's advocate and point out the host of injuries to White Sox minor leaguers in 2018 and the effect all that health uncertainty could have on the timeline of this whole enterprise. Kopech will miss the entire 2019 season while recovering from Tommy John surgery. Dane Dunning has his own elbow injury to deal with. Luis Robert is healthy now but was robbed of much of a year of development time with thumb injuries. Jake Burger didn't play a lick in 2018 because of a pair of Achilles tears. Alec Hansen was the organization's No. 2 pitching prospect at this time last year before a lost season in 2018 due to a forearm injury and a demotion to Class A not long after his return to the mound.

But those always-entertaining 2020 lineup projections are still full of guys now making their way into the upper levels of the system. They're maybe months, a year or just a tad more away from cracking the big leagues.

And so the light at the end of the rebuilding tunnel is not Harper or Machado, though adding a 26-year-old superstar who fits in with the long-term plan certainly gets the White Sox closer to that point. The light is those rebuilding plans finally starting to come to fruition, the ascent of all that talent acquired when Hahn's front office traded Chris Sale and Adam Eaton and Jose Quintana. And because of that, there's a future worth selling to the best players in the game.

It also means there's a future with or without Harper and Machado, a fact that shouldn't be lost on anyone should the White Sox not win either free-agent sweepstakes.

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Brendan Perlini still trying to find role with Blackhawks

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AP

Brendan Perlini still trying to find role with Blackhawks

Brendan Perlini's start with the Blackhawks hasn't been ideal. He has zero points and is a minus-6 rating through six games since being acquired — along with Dylan Strome — from the Arizona Coyotes for Nick Schmaltz on Nov. 25. 

In his most recent game, Perlini logged only five shifts and was benched for the final 28:28 in a 4-3 loss to the Vegas Golden Knights on Thursday. Two days later he found himself a healthy scratch. It's been a little more than two weeks now, but Perlini is still trying to find his role in Chicago.

"You always want to be playing, but I always take the positive in everything and try to improve no matter what the situation is," Perlini said. "It's always tough, you come into a new situation, new things going on, you don't know too many people. ... There's a lot of things going on. I just have to stay focused on what I can do to help the team improve each day."

Is he feeling some pressure to live up to the trade and trying to do too much early on?

‘‘Nah, not really,’’ Perlini said. ‘‘I’m an easygoing guy. I just like to come and play hockey, and that’s it. I don’t think crazy things and blah, blah, blah. I just like to have fun, do my thing, work hard, improve. Hopefully the rest falls into place.’’

The Blackhawks aren't asking too much out of him. He's not going to produce big numbers offensively because that's not the kind of player he is. At 6-foot-3, 211 pounds, Perlini is more of a power forward and the Blackhawks want him to be harder to play against so that he can turn into a consistent top-9 forward.

"We just want him to have a little more urgency without the puck," coach Jeremy Colliton said. "Skate, work, work away from the puck, and I think he'll put himself in good situations."

Perhaps it's a little more difficult to establish your role when the team is on a seven-game losing streak because there's lots of mixing and matching going on as they search for the right formula to break out of it. Perlini (and Strome) has yet to be a part of a win with the Blackhawks, which probably isn't helping as they get acclimated to their new locker room.

But it's also an opportunity to take control and make an impact when things aren't going your way, both individually and as a team, and learn from some of the veterans who have three Stanley Cups on their resume.

"I'm just trying to improve with different things every day and learn off the guys," Perlini said. "Obviously, some unbelievable players. The team is going through a skid, but you take a look around the room — [Jonathan] Toews, [Patrick] Kane, all the guys who have won things and done tremendous things in the game — those are the guys you want to be around and learn from and improve from. For me, regardless of what the situation is, I’m always going to try to improve and better myself.’’