Cubs

Knicks star hurts hand in postgame incident

750472.jpg

Knicks star hurts hand in postgame incident

From Comcast SportsNet
MIAMI (AP) -- Amare Stoudemire draped a towel over his left hand as he walked into the privacy of the New York Knicks' training room an hour after the game, needing a sanctuary from prying eyes. The specifics of what Stoudemire did immediately after Game 2 were unclear. Only this was certain: His hand was cut so severely that doctors and paramedics were summoned, drops of blood stained the carpet, a piece of glass in the door to a fire-extinguisher case needed to be replaced, and a bad night for the Knicks on the court got much worse when Stoudemire walked off it. Stoudemire's availability -- and New York's hopes -- for the rest of this Eastern Conference first-round series against the Miami Heat look bleak at best, first because the Knicks were beaten 104-94 on Monday night to fall into a 2-0 hole in the best-of-seven matchup, then because of whatever emotions boiled over near the locker room afterward. "I am so mad at myself right now, I want to apologize to the fans and my team, not proud of my actions, headed home for a new start," Stoudemire wrote on Twitter about two hours after the game. Game 3 is Thursday. Before the Knicks left the arena for the flight to New York, a team official said the extent of the injury is unknown. But in the locker room, Knicks center Tyson Chandler said he did not expect Stoudemire to be able to play when the series returns to Madison Square Garden. "I'm not going to comment until I see or hear what's going on with it," Knicks coach Mike Woodson said. Moments later, Woodson said he had seen the cut, then stopped short of saying anything else about what took place. "I'm not going to go there," Woodson said. So on their trip to Miami, the Knicks lost two games and two starters. Guard Iman Shumpert was lost for 6 to 8 months after tearing a knee ligament in Game 1, a freak play after a misstep. Stoudemire now appears gone as well, because of a mistake. "You never want to hear anyone gets hurt," said Miami guard Dwyane Wade, who led the Heat with 25 points. "Hopefully he gets better. We want all their guns on the court." Chris Bosh added 21 points and LeBron James finished with 19 points, nine assists and seven rebounds for the Heat, but their night was completely overshadowed by whatever went on with Stoudemire in the hallway that's just a few steps from the edge of the court. "I really don't know what's the situation with that," said Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony, who said he was "on the court" when whatever happened with Stoudemire occurred. Everything the Heat did seemed like old news quickly after the game, when all anyone really wanted to talk about was what was going on in the Knicks locker room. Miami-Dade paramedics -- who staff every game -- were summoned while reporters were kept outside much longer than the typical 10-minute cooling-off period. "We're all frustrated," Chandler said. Stoudemire declined to say anything when he walked out of the shower area in the locker room, one towel around his waist, another shielding his left hand. Almost forgotten: Miami had just sent New York to its NBA-record-tying 12th straight postseason loss. "This is a series," Chandler said. "We've got to go home win the next two and turn it into a best-of-three after that." Anthony scored 30 points on 12-for-26 shooting for New York, which got 18 points from Stoudemire and 13 apiece from Chandler and J.R. Smith. The only other team to lose 12 straight playoff games is the Memphis Grizzlies, who dropped their first dozen postseason contests from 2004 through 2006. New York's last postseason win came April 29, 2001. Mario Chalmers scored 13 points and Mike Miller and Shane Battier each shot 3 for 5 from 3-point range on their way to 11-point games for the defending East champion Heat, who shot 52 percent. "Every game we try to find our shooters, get them comfortable in the offense and once they catch them, they can let it fly," James said. "It was concerted effort tonight to get them the ball and move the ball from one side to the other." Baron Davis, who sat most of the first half and has been battling back issues, finished with 12 points for the Knicks. The Heat came into the game saying they expected Anthony to be much more aggressive. They were right. Anthony opened with an 11-shot quarter -- the last time someone took more in the first 12 minutes of a playoff game was May 15, 2006, when Richard Hamilton got 12 shots off for Detroit against Cleveland. Anthony missed all seven of the jumpers he took in Game 1 when guarded by James, then got his first one to fall on the game's first possession Monday. By halftime, Anthony was up to 21 points on 9-for-18 shooting, the Knicks needing all that and more. Wade, James and Bosh combined for 41 points in the first two quarters, helping Miami take a 53-47 lead. Unlike Game 1, it wasn't over by halftime. And play was heated, just not overheated. Well, until postgame, anyway. For nearly three quarters, whenever Miami was on the cusp of pulling away, New York had answers. Consecutive baskets by James midway through the third quarter, the second of those good enough for him to merit it worthy of a chest-bump and long look at the Knicks bench, put Miami up 67-56 -- then its biggest lead. Four minutes later, the Knicks were within four, a dunk by Chandler making it 72-68 with 1:37 left in the period. Miami's margin was back to nine after a flurry ended the third. James drove right and got just about every Knick to shift with him, leaving Battier all alone for a 3-pointer, and James' three-point play as the shot clock was running down had him laughing and the Heat up 78-69 going into the fourth. The Knicks never got any closer, and the Heat wound up holding serve at home. "We did what we're supposed to do," Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. "It's not anything more than that. We're already trying to leave this game behind." By then, word was just seeping out of what happened in the Knicks locker room. "Amare is a huge piece of this team," Chandler said. "And, you know, without him, it's going to make it more difficult." Notes: Knicks G Mike Bibby came out of one of his shoes during play early in the second quarter, then was miffed after Wade picked up the sneaker and tossed it out of his reach as New York took the ball into the offensive end. "I don't think many people have done that before," Wade said. ... Heat F Udonis Haslem bought tickets for relatives of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teen who was killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer in Sanford, Fla. on Feb. 26. ... Shumpert watched from the locker room. ... It's the first time the Heat have held a 2-0 series lead over the Knicks. All four previous matchups were split after the opening two games.

Cubs sign oft-injured reliever Brandon Morrow to minor-league deal

brandon_morrow_usa_today.jpg
USA TODAY

Cubs sign oft-injured reliever Brandon Morrow to minor-league deal

Brandon Morrow hasn’t pitched in a big-league game since July 2018, but he’ll get a shot at making a comeback next season.

Morrow is set to sign a minor league deal with the Cubs, according to Bob Nightengale of USA Today. It’s worth $1 million if he makes the Cubs' roster and could reach $2.25 million if Morrow makes 65 big-league appearances. 

Morrow hasn’t pitched since July 15, 2018, missing the second half of that season with right biceps inflammation. He underwent a debridement procedure on his right elbow last offseason, which was supposed to keep him out for the first month of the 2019 season. But Morrow suffered several setbacks and never pitched in 2019. 

Morrow’s agent, Joel Wolfe, told Gordon Wittenmyer of the Chicago Sun-Times last month that the right-hander feels a sense of loyalty to the Cubs after they stuck by him through thick and thin. He said Morrow was open to a minor league deal.

When he last pitched, Morrow was one of the most dominant closers in baseball. He posted a 1.47 ERA in 35 games in 2018, converting 22 of 24 save tries. He provided the Cubs with a power arm in the back of the bullpen, striking out 31 batters in 30 2/3 innings compared to nine walks.

For the Cubs, Morrow is a low-risk addition with high-reward potential. He told ESPN’s Jesse Rogers that his arm feels great. If he’s healthy, he could be a major contributor to the Cubs' bullpen.

This time, the Cubs won’t place such high expectations on the 35-year-old. They expect closer Craig Kimbrel to bounce back in 2020 with a normal offseason ahead of him. Kimbrel signed a three-year, $43 million deal with the Cubs last June and struggled mightily, posting a 6.53 ERA in 23 games.

If healthy, Morrow could prove to be a lethal weapon in front of Kimbrel. If he can’t stay healthy, it’s not like the Cubs are investing a lot of money in him, as they did two offseasons ago when Morrow signed a two-year, $21 million deal.

Simply put: if Morrow pans out, great. If he can’t stay healthy, the Cubs can move on without losing a large investment.

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams Cubs games easily on your device.

It might be Bear Weather, but Sunday's forecast complicates things for Nagy and Co.

It might be Bear Weather, but Sunday's forecast complicates things for Nagy and Co.

The high temperature in Green Bay on Sunday is going to be 18 degrees. That won’t come until 2-3 p.m., though – when the Bears and Packers kick off two hours earlier, temperatures will be floating in the low teens. Of course, considering windchill, that feels more like five or six. It took 15 weeks and a 200 mile drive north, but the 2019 season is finally getting some Bear Weather.

“You’re talking about two teams here in Chicago and Green Bay that are kind of used to it,” Matt Nagy said on Wednesday. “I would say [the weather is an issue] probably more so if you’re dealing with teams from the West Coast, or more from the warmer weather coming into this.” 

It’s shaping up to be the type of game where 1000 photos of the linemen’s breath scatter the internet, and someone will *absolutely* use the phrase black-and-blue, or bare-knuckle-brawl to describe the matchup. It wouldn’t be Bears-Packers canon without a frostbite warning, but as fun as it is to show up to the frozen tundras dangerously underdressed and maybe overserved, the cold may end up being the Bears’ biggest adversary not wearing #12. 

“What I’ll say is this – I’ve heard from older family members that when it’s cold outside, you feel a little something when you’ve had an injury in the past,” Akiem Hicks said. “But hopefully I don’t have to feel anything like that. Pray for me”

Hicks is one of two defensive starters that should return to action on Sunday, frost forgiving. Cornerback Prince Amukamara, who missed last Thursday’s game with a hamstring injury, was a full participant in practice all week, and will be out there with the starting 11 again this weekend. 

“It’s big because with some of the things they do schematically, the wide receivers they have, Prince brings a lot of experience,” Nagy said. “So having that experience out there against such a quality quarterback in Aaron, that’s huge.” 

Another issue? The kicking game. While he’s quietly kicked well over the Bears’ three-game win streak, Eddy Pineiro has been open about how he’s still learning how to adjust to kicking in cold weather. He’s struggled at times with how the ball comes off his foot differently when the temperatures dip, and he’s worked – primarily outside – with special teams coordinator Chris Tabor to get a better feel for the environment. 

“We really don't talk about it to be honest with you,” Tabor said. “To be honest, the weather is the weather. We have zero control over it. Obviously, it won't travel as far but he just has to go up and hit his football. I mean we went outside and kicked yesterday, that was an awful cold day and he did just fine. So that was good."

A third issue? (Don’t you feel great at this point?) There have apparently been concerns this season about Lambeau’s turf, which historically has been considered one of the best. Add a bad field to frigid conditions, and all of a sudden that 10-3 result from Week 1 doesn’t seem so far-fetched anymore. 

“It affects every position. I mean, we’ve looked at the tape, there’s guys in previous games on that field where there’s long snappers that are slipping,” said Nagy, who then credited Bears’ equipment manager Tony Medlin for having a full plan in place for if players start slipping and sliding. 

“... our guys will be prepared, but obviously the skill positions – the guys that are breaking and cutting, running deep--DBs, wide receivers – is probably where you see it the most. Sometimes, you can see it with edge rushers as they go to cut the corner, you can see some slipping and falling. So we want to be smart.”