Bears

The latest from the Jerry Sandusky trial

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The latest from the Jerry Sandusky trial

From Comcast SportsNet
BELLEFONTE, Pa. (AP) -- Jurors in Jerry Sandusky's child sex-abuse trial are likely to hear more graphic testimony Wednesday, following two days of accounts of alleged sex assaults involving the former Penn State assistant football coach and boys he met through his charity. Two of Sandusky's alleged victims have already testified and a former assistant coach, Mike McQueary, described seeing Sandusky sexually assault a boy in a Penn State shower. McQueary's father, John, appeared likely to be among those taking the stand soon. Before the start of Wednesday's proceedings, he entered the courthouse through a canopied door used by witnesses. On Tuesday, Mike McQueary recounted a 2001 encounter in which he saw Sandusky and a young boy in a position that he believes meant Sandusky was sodomizing the child. In a voice alternating between calm and forcefulness, McQueary said he walked into a university athletics locker room more than a decade ago to the sound of a "skin-on-skin smacking sound." In a mirror, he said, he could see into the showers and saw Sandusky standing behind a boy who was "propped up against a wall." The identity of the boy who was said to have been in the showers remains a mystery to prosecutors. Earlier Tuesday, the teen identified by prosecutors as "Victim 1" struggled to retain his composure while recounting the humiliation and fear that accompanied alleged abuse at Sandusky's hands. The boy, now 18 and a recent high school graduate, said sleepovers in a bedroom in the basement of Sandusky's State College home escalated into kissing, fondling and oral sex. Eventually, he testified, Sandusky said it was his turn to reciprocate the act of his alleged molester. He said he could not resist. "I don't know how to explain it, I froze," he said. "My mind is telling me to move but I couldn't do it, I couldn't move." Sandusky, 68, is on trial on charges he molested 10 boys over a 15-year period -- allegations he has denied. Authorities say he abused them in hotels, at his home and inside the football team's headquarters. Sandusky's attorneys have suggested his accusers have financial motivations for coming forward and questioned why Victim 1's initial accounts omitted some allegations he made later. The teen said he changed his story repeatedly out of shame and fear, and when he finally did confide to a school guidance counselor, he was told by an unidentified school official or officials that Sandusky "has a heart of gold, and he wouldn't do something like that." "So they didn't believe me," the teenager said. The teen's account of abuse was later referred to county social workers and eventually spawned the grand jury investigation that led to the charges.

Are expectations too high for Bears WR Allen Robinson?

Are expectations too high for Bears WR Allen Robinson?

Allen Robinson was signed in free agency to become the alpha dog of the Chicago Bears' wide receiver corps. The three-year, $42 million contract that general manager Ryan Pace signed him to is proof of how high expectations are for the fifth-year pro.

Robinson isn't coming to Chicago with a flawless resume, however. His massive breakout year in 2015 (1,400 yards, 14 touchdowns) was followed by a pedestrian 883 yards in 2016 and a torn ACL in Week 1 last year. That begs the question: Is the forecast for Robinson's impact in 2018 too high right now?

According to Bleacher Report's Doug Farrar, the answer is yes. Robinson was named as the Bear most likely to disappoint this season.

Robinson practiced for the first time since the injury during the Bears' May minicamp, but it's safe to say Chicago isn't sure what it has in Robinson. If he gets back to his 2015 numbers, that would be huge for the Bears' passing offense, but given his 2016 regression and the specter of the 2017 injury, that's a tough bet.

Robinson will have an impact that goes beyond the traditional box score, and it will happen this season. Is he a lock to reach 1,000 yards and double-digit touchdowns? No, but his presence on the field will be enough to see a return on investment. The Bears haven't had the kind of threat he poses to defenses in several seasons, and his ability to pull a defensive coordinator's attention away from the running game will do wonders for Chicago's offensive output.

Determining whether Robinson is a disappointment in 2018 will depend on who's evaluating his season. Sure, he may disappoint in fantasy football circles if he doesn't re-emerge as a game-changing stat monster. But if he makes the Bears offense a more well-rounded and productive group, he'll live up to the expectations set by Pace and coach Matt Nagy.

As long as Robinson is pleasing Pace and Nagy, nothing else really matters.

Summer of Sammy: Sosa's 32nd homer in 1998

Summer of Sammy: Sosa's 32nd homer in 1998

It's the 20th anniversary of the Summer of Sammy, when Sosa and Mark McGwire went toe-to-toe in one of the most exciting seasons in American sports history chasing after Roger Maris' home run record. All year, we're going to go homer-by-homer on Sosa's 66 longballs, with highlights and info about each. Enjoy.

Sosa victimized the Tigers pitching staff again on the next night, taking Brian Moehler deep in the 7th inning for a 400-foot solo blast.

The homer tied the game at 3, but the Cubs blew the lead in the bottom of the 7th when the Terrys (Adams and Mulholland) gave up 3 runs. The Cubs wound up losing 6-4.

The Cubs were putting together a really nice season in 1998 that ended with a trip to October. They entered the series with the Tigers with a 42-34 record, yet lost both games to a Detroit team that entered the series with a 28-45 record. The Tigers finished the season 65-94; the Cubs finished 90-73.

Fun fact: Luis Gonzalez was the Tigers left fielder and No. 5 hitter for both games of the series. He spent part of the 1995 season and all of '96 on Chicago's North Side. 1998 was his only year in Detroit before he moved on to Arizona, where he hit 57 homers in 2001 and helped the Diamondbacks to a World Series championship with that famous broken-bat single in Game 7.

Fun fact  No. 2: Remember Pedro Valdes? He only had a cup of coffee with the Cubs (9 games in 1996 and 14 in '98), but started in left field on June 25, 1998. He walked and went 0-for-1 before being removed from the game for a pinch-hitter (Jose Hernandez).