Bulls

Marshall creating more than just separation or catches

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Marshall creating more than just separation or catches

Brandon Marshall is doing things hes never done before, and the effect is bringing an almost palpable change in the chemistry within the Bears wide-receiver group. (Put another way, Roy Williams is gone, in more ways than one.)

Indeed, the first thing you notice isnt Marshall catching passes in drills or 7-on-7s or team sessions. Its what he was doing in warmups.

Marshall is treating the casual throw-and-catch prelim of organized team activity sessions with the same kind of spirit that is typically reserved for those drills when theyre run before a game.

Without degenerating into wanton rah-rah, Marshall is giving a high-five or back slap to each teammate coming in after making his catch. He runs even his warmup routes like they matter.

If hes seeming like a teacher or role model, its because he is, and thats exactly how he sees himself.

I guess its in me, in a way, Marshall said. It took seven years to harness it and put it in a positive direction, and Im excited about it.

This is the first year that Ive actually felt pressure as far as, Ive got to work because theres some young guys and Im getting older, but also, Im recognizing how important it is to bring those guys along. This is a first for me, but Im embracing the opportunity.

The contrast is nothing less than stark between this situation and last years with Williams, signed post-lockout to reprise the kind of season he had once under Mike Martz in Detroit, being anything but a role model for the Bears group of young wideouts.

Williams reported admittedly out of football shape, compromising his effectiveness with unfamiliar quarterbacks who were throwing to a receiver who was sub-standard out of breaks and achieving separation.

His suspect effort grated on some in his group, particularly when he was installed over Johnny Knox as one of the starting wideouts.

That is gone now. Instead of a receiver who fell well short of greatness, the Bears this year have brought in one who is at a point in his career when that has to be the absolute goal.

We strive for greatness, Marshall said. Even in warm-ups and in route running, we get upset when we drop balls or miss throws or call the wrong plays. We know what we expect out of each other, and we know what we expect of guys around us. So were excited.

Coby White's hair is special, but it looks wild in a draft day Bulls hat

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USA TODAY

Coby White's hair is special, but it looks wild in a draft day Bulls hat

After some pre-draft trade shook up the draft order before the Bulls' pick at No. 7, the first five picks went as expected. Once Minnesota grabbed Jarrett Culver at No. 6, North Carolina point guard Coby White was there at No. 7 and the Bulls pounced on him.

When he walked up to the stage, big hair and all, and put on a Bulls hat, well, it was a moment.

White's hair is special. Maybe the best in the draft class. It doesn't fit well under a hat though.

About 50 seconds into this video you can see White hit the stage and he is handed his Bulls hat. He tries to put it on his head, but after multiple attempts, it doesn't exactly sit right. He makes it a few steps before adjusting the hat again and then sort of just gets to a point where it sat on his head good enough.

It's an all-time draft hat moment. It may not be as good as Lonnie Walker last year, but it's still up there.

It also brings another Bulls draft pick who had hair that wasn't meant to be worn with a hat, Joakim Noah.

 

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Why Cubs feel they've created the perfect situation for Adbert Alzolay to succeed

Why Cubs feel they've created the perfect situation for Adbert Alzolay to succeed

The day has finally come. The Pitcher that was Promised has actually made his way to Wrigley Field.

Adbert Alzolay's first big-league game Thursday might be the most thrilling debut for a pitching prospect for Cubs fans since Mark Prior and it represents the end of a long road for the 24-year-old right-hander and for the organization in general.

The Cubs initially signed Alzolay in 2012 as a 17-year-old out of Venezuela, but he really didn't put himself on the map until a breakout 2017 season with Advanced Class-A Myrtle Beach. He probably would've made his debut last year if not for a lat injury that ended his season in late May and he has the potential to be the first homegrown pitcher to make a real impact at the big-league level under Theo Epstein's front office.

"The stuff's really pretty good — good delivery, strike-thrower," Joe Maddon said. "All those kinds of things. He has the kind of ability that he could transform a group. Then again, you don't want to lay too much on him. He's a young man, he's just trying to make his mark.

"With the surroundings here and the other guys that are on the staff to wrap their arms around him, I think this is the perfect situation for him to morph into a team like this."

The Cubs wanted to ease Alzolay into major-league life and felt Tyler Chatwood had earned an opportunity to start Thursday's game amid a resurgent season, so Alzolay will back up Chatwood as a potential long relief option. Maddon said before the game he was aiming to get Alzolay into a clean inning and since the kid doesn't have much experience as a reliever, they want to give him plenty of time to warm up and get loose.

Maddon also wants Alzolay to enjoy himself and take in the entire experience.

The Cubs haven't made any determinations beyond Thursday's game with their rotation, so it's possible Alzolay and Chatwood could both be vying for the next turn in the order as Kyle Hendricks' return from a shoulder injury is not imminent. 

Nobody can predict the future, but Maddon said the Cubs have already been discussing "different methods" in how they can keep Alzolay here in Chicago, even when Hendricks returns. If the young pitcher performs, he could be a real weapon for the team in the second half and down the stretch.

Of course, it's all about health with Alzolay and there is no guarantee he has immediate success. But he's been on fire lately in Triple-A Iowa — 1.93 ERA, 40 strikeouts vs. only 3 walks in his last 28 innings — and with a group of veteran pitchers around him to learn from, it wouldn't be crazy to see him stick. It also helps that he has a fellow Venezuelan native as his catcher (Willson Contreras).

"Having never even seen him throw a baseball live — what I hear and what I see via video, I'm betting on him," Maddon said.

Alzolay has credited his development as a pitcher to improved production from his curveball and feels more confident in his changeup to accompany a fastball that can reach the mid-to-upper 90s.

On top of the physical attributes, Alzolay has drawn rave reviews from Cubs brass for his makeup and intangibles. He's also been making use of the times he's not on a mound by watching and studying MLB video.

"During my time off — after the games down there in Triple-A or even in spring training starting last year — I've been watching a lot of videos from all those guys to see the way they work here in the big leagues," Alzolay said. "Watching different guys that have the same kind of stuff that I have — watching and learning from that. I think it will help."

He also watched video of himself from 2017 and realize that he was too slow last year, so worked to speed up his tempo this season. 

Maddon believes life experience has helped mold Alzolay into the person and pitcher he is today, citing the 24-year-old's upbringing in Venezuela.

"He's a very mature young man," Maddon said. "...He slows things down. When you speak to him, he speaks clearly and slowly. I watch him on video and you get this sense of confidence when he throws the baseball. I think he knows exactly what he wants to do when he's out there, so he elicits confidence from that, also. He's just a very mature young man."

While Alzolay's debut is a source of excitement for the fanbase and everybody can dream on his tantalizing potential, his journey to the big leagues as a homegrown pitcher matters. This is a different situation than Kyle Hendricks or Carl Edwards Jr., since both players were drafted and partially developed in other organizations. 

At a time when the Cubs have an aging — and expensive — pitching staff, they could really use a guy like Alzolay to come up to the majors and stick...especially if it's eventually in the rotation.

"If you're running the organization, it's a big deal," Maddon said. "When you're able to draft and develop or sign and develop players, yeah there's something to that. When you have them right out of the womb, man, there's a lot of investment in that — from the scouts to the development people to the big-league staff. 

"But there's always a sense of pride of developing your own. That's just true. Whether there's a shortstop or a third baseman or whatever. And the fact that we've had a hard time developing pitchers that have arrived at the big-league level, yeah, it's good to get your feet on the ground with that and then try to recreate the template as you go along.

"I think everybody takes a strong sense of pride in watching his development."