White Sox

McDonald's won't return in 2013

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McDonald's won't return in 2013

Chicagoans who are looking forward to seeing Simeon's Jabari Parker participate in the annual McDonald's All-America basketball game in 2013 will be disappointed.

The game, which was held at the United Center last year and will be held in the same venue on March 28, won't return in 2013.

There aren't any Chicago products in this year's McDonald's boys game, one of the few times in the history of the selections that Illinois has failed to be represented.

However, there will be three local representatives in the girls game -- Connecticut-bound Morgan Tuck of Bolingbrook, Kentucky-bound Janee Thompson of Whitney Young and Notre Dame-bound Jewell Loyd of Nlles West.

And the Chicago area will be represented on the sideline with coaches Tanya Johnson of Zion-Benton, who will guide the girls West team, and Gordon Kerkman of West Aurora, who will direct the boys West team.

Both are well-qualified. Johnson coached Loyola to state championships in 1997 and 1998. Kerkman has won more than 725 games in his career, including a state title in 2000.

The nation's top-rated seniors will be on display, too. The girls are led by Breanna Stewart of Cicero, N.Y., who is committed to Connecticut, while the boys are led by Shabazz Muhammad of Las Vegas, Nevada, who is uncommitted.

But next year? The class of 2013 in Illinois is one of the best ever produced. Parker, arguably the No. 1 player in the nation regardless of class, could be accompanied by Belleville East's Malcolm Hill or Morgan Park's Billy Garrett Jr. or Whitney Young's Tommy Hamilton or Kendrick Nunn, Parker's teammate at Simeon. Hill is committed to Illinois.

Illinois' only chance to land a spot on the McDonald's All-America 24-member team fell far short this year. Simeon's Steve Taylor ranks No. 52.

"Taylor is a talented player but not a McDonald's All-American," said longtime recruiting analyst Bob Gibbons of All-Star Sports, who is a member of the selection committee. "This year was a down year for talent. But next year is a different matter."

This marks the first time in the 35-year history of the McDonald's game that the same city will host in back-to-back years. Chicago was chosen to host for the second year in a row because the game drew a record crowd of 23,000 to the United Center last year. And McDonald's headquarters is based in the Chicago area. But it won't three-peat in 2013.

Gibbons has questioned the politics of the selection process for the McDonald's All-America game for many years. "The selection process is flawed. There are too many people on the committee. Some people don't see all the players," he said.

The selection process consumes six weeks, from an original list of 100 candidates to 50 to 40, then the final 24.

The selection committee, which also includes longtime recruiting analyst Van Coleman of Top100Hoops.com, usually picks about 22 of the players. Then Morgan Wootten, head of the selection committee, and the McDonald's sponsors or game administrators, including founder Bob Geoghan, have some leeway to choose one or two players based on position or local interest. But they normally rank among the top 30-40 players.

"Some changes have been made to help the game but most have been to appease friends or coaches or to help ticket sales," one committee member said. "That's how occasionally a player rated in the 50 to 75 range is selected."

At a recent meeting, the conversation got heated at times when some members of the selection committee pointed to problems with the process and the fact that too many people on the committee don't see all of the players, thus skewing the voting.

In fact, the issues among committee members became so heated among certain factions that Wootten announced he was going to resign, then was talked into remaining as head of the committee.

I remember my first trip to cover a national high school all-star basketball game in 1978. It was the fifth McDonald's Capital Classic in Landover, Maryland, the prelude to the first McDonald's All-America Game, and Westinghouse's Mark Aguirre had been selected as one of 12 players from across the country to participate in the elite event.

The players, McDonald's officials and the media were housed in a Sheraton hotel near the Maryland campus in College Park, Maryland. The team worked out at nearby DeMatha High School, the nationally recognized program directed by legendary coach Morgan Wootten, head of the McDonald's selection committee.

Recruiting wasn't as ballyhooed in those days and the Internet hadn't been invented yet. But there was Maryland coach Lefty Driesell, one of the smoothest operators in the business, holding court in Room 330. The players were housed on the ninth floor. Driesell lived only 10 minutes from the hotel.

Driesell, who built a reputation by recruiting Moses Malone, Tom McMillan and Albert King, passed up the NCAA finals in St. Louis to attend the McDonald's event.

But he wasn't the only coach who was walking the halls or camping out in the lobby, hoping to be noticed by the player they happened to be recruiting. DePaul assistant Joey Meyer was there, too. So were Kentucky's Joe B. Hall, Michigan's Johnny Orr, Colorado's Terry Truax, Marquette's Hank Raymonds, Louisville's Denny Crum and Michigan State's Jud Heathcote.

Meyer and Truax were zeroing in on Aguirre. It was only a few days before the national signing date and everybody was making their last pitch to impress the recruits. Truax met Aguirre's plane at the airport. But Meyer, confident that DePaul had an edge all along, kept a low profile.

Recruiting hasn't changed over the last 30 years.

"This is the most distasteful time of the season," Truax said. "Honestly, I'd rather be somewhere I could do more good. But you have to show up. A kid knows if you're there and he knows if you're not there. And you have to keep doing your homework because some schools with the big reputations and the pizzazz might come in at the last minute and steal a kid from you."

"You've got to baby-sit," Meyer said. "Recruiting is like playing a game. You measure your success by wins and losses. You spend so much time on a kid. If you lose him, it's the same kind of disappointment that you feel if you lose in overtime. You always second-guess yourself, wondering if you made a mistake, if you should have come in sooner or done something different."

The object of most of the recruiters' attention was guard Dwight Anderson. He was so good that he played in Sonny Vaccaro's Dapper Dan all-star game in Pittsburgh on Friday night, then was flown in a private plane to Washington D.C. for the Capitol Classic the next night.

Anderson wanted to go to Kentucky. Coach Joe B. Hall was in his shadow wherever he went. He played for two years at Kentucky, then transferred to USC. He was selected in the first round of the NBA draft but played for only one season.

Wootten said Aguirre reminded him of one of his former stars, Adrian Dantley...big hands, big legs, such big shoulders, so strong. As it turned out, Aguirre was the only one of the 12 who went on to have a significant career in college and the NBA.

"He's awesome," Washington State coach George Raveling said. "I think a lot of people overlooked him. And they regret it now."

The coach of one of the other players said: "Aguirre is the best player here. Nobody on the floor is more intense than he is. He's so big and strong. Nobody can handle him."

Remember the others? Dwight Anderson, Cornelius Thompson, Clarence Tillman, Carlton "Scooter" McCray, Leonel Marquetti, Jerry Eaves, Rudy Woods, Guy Morgan, Vince Taylor, Tony Guy, Devin Durrant.

Aguirre, who scored 17 points for the winning West team in the 1978 McDonald's All-America Game at the Spectrum in Philadelphia, wasn't named one of the 35 greatest McDonald's All-Americans. But four other Chicago area products were--St. Joseph's Isiah Thomas, Proviso East's Glenn "Doc" Rivers, Farragut's Kevin Garnett and Simeon's Derrick Rose.

King's Efrem Winters was MVP of the 1982 game at Rosemont, the only other time the event was held in the Chicago area. Garnett was MVP of the
1995 game in St. Louis. And Thornwood's Eddy Curry was MVP of the 2001 game at Duke's Cameron Indoor Stadium.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Manny Machado Mania

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: Manny Machado Mania

Manny Machado to the White Sox?? It's been the dream for many White Sox fans for months.

With Machado in town to the play the White Sox, Chuck Garfien and Vinnie Duber discuss the White Sox chances of signing the soon-to-be-free agent.

Garfien also talks with Nicky Delmonico who played with Machado and fellow free agent to be Bryce Harper on the U.S.A. 18-under national team.

Listen to the full episode at this link or in the embedded player below:

Rick Renteria issues another benching after Welington Castillo doesn't hustle on popup

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USA TODAY

Rick Renteria issues another benching after Welington Castillo doesn't hustle on popup

One thing you better do if you play for Rick Renteria is run to first base.

Yet again, Renteria benched one of his players Monday for the sin of not hustling down the line.

Welington Castillo, a veteran, not a developing player in need of ample “learning experiences,” popped up to first base with two runners on and nobody out in the sixth inning of Monday’s eventual 3-2 loss to the visiting Baltimore Orioles. He did not run down to first, instead staying at home plate.

So when the inning ended and the White Sox took the field, Castillo stayed in the dugout.

Ricky’s boys don’t quit, or so the slogan goes. But what happens when a player doesn’t live up to that mantra? What happens when they don’t play their absolute hardest for all 27 outs, as the T-shirts preach? This is what happens. A benching.

“It was towering fly ball in the infield at first, probably had 15, 20 seconds of hangtime,” Renteria explained after the game. “I assumed the dropped ball. It has occurred. He could, at minimum, at least start moving that way.

“That’s uncharacteristic of him, to be honest, it truly is. Maybe he was just frustrated in that he had the fly ball and just stayed at the plate, but there was no movement toward first at all. And you guys have heard me talk to all the guys about at least giving an opportunity to move in that particular direction.

“Everybody says, ‘Well, 99 out of (100) times he’s going to catch that ball.’ And then that one time that he doesn’t, what would I do if the ball had been dropped? Would it have made it easier to pull him? Well, it was just as easy because you expect not the best, but the worst.

“That is uncharacteristic of that young man. I had a quick conversation with him on the bench, and he knew and that was it.”

It might seem a little overdramatic, a little nutty, even, to sit down a veteran catcher brought in this offseason to provide some offense and to do it in a one-run game. But this rebuild is about more than just waiting around for the minor league talent to make its way to the South Side. It’s about developing an organizational culture, too. And Renteria feels that if he lets this kind of thing slide at the big league level, that won’t send the right message to those precious prospects who will one day fill out this lineup.

“There’s one way to do it, you get your action, you start moving toward that direction in which you’ve got to go,” Renteria said. “What would’ve happened if everybody’s watching it — and I’m setting the tone for not only here, our club, (but also for) everybody in the minor leagues — and they’re saying, ‘Well, at the top, they said they’re going to do this and then they don’t do it.’

“It’s really simple. And people might like it, not like it. I’ve got to do this, do that so everybody understands what we’re trying to do here. We’re not done with what we’re trying to do.”

This isn’t the first time this has happened in 2018. Avisail Garcia was taken out of a game during spring training for not giving maximum effort. Leury Garcia was removed from a game earlier this month for not busting it down the first-base line on a weak grounder that went right to the first baseman.

It’s become a somewhat common tactic for Renteria, and while it might strike some as taking things a little too seriously, what good is this developmental season if a culture goes undeveloped? The White Sox have placed their bright future, in part, in Renteria’s hands, and they’ve talked glowingly about how the players have bought into his style and how the team played last season under his leadership.

If Renteria truly is the right man for the rebuild, things like this are how he’s going to establish his culture. And it will, he hopes, impact how all those prospects play when they’re no longer prospects and the White Sox are contending for championships.