Bears

Myers: Ugly lockout dialogue crosses the line

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Myers: Ugly lockout dialogue crosses the line

Theres plenty of frustration to go around as the NHL lockout continues. Players are frustrated. The NHLPA is frustrated. The league brass is frustrated. Owners arent talked, but well assume theyre frustrated, too.

But when frustration boils over into ugliness, its a problem.

When talking about NHL commissioner Gary Bettman, a few players comments have crossed the line. The latest comes from former player Jeff ONeill, who threw out this tweet this afternoon:

And Bettman stop talking to the media. I wanna 'make whole' in your fkn head.

A few hours later, however, ONeill tweeted that he didnt tweet the above:
My last tweet was inappropriate. Someone hacked my acct.
Whether it was a hack or the former players thoughts, ONeill was right: it was inappropriate. And it doesnt matter if its on social media, through the newspapers or on the radio. Messages like that solve nothing and hurt all involved.
Ditto for others who (we assume) let emotions get the best of them this past week: from Detroits Ian White calling Bettman an idiot to former Blackhawks forward Kris Versteeg going on the radio and referring to Bettman and deputy commissioner Bill Daly as cancers.

ONeills tweet came not long after todays talks yielded a new NHLPA proposal, but no progress in getting a new collective bargaining agreement. Emotions run high each time negotiations stall, and it only builds as the lockout continues. Its easy to throw quick reactions onto a Twitter or Facebook in the heat of the moment, but its usually a bad idea.

Many players have talked at will throughout this lockout they, unlike the owners, have no gag order binding them. Most have been very dignified in doing so. San Jose Sharks forward Logan Couture vented his frustration with less spite on Twitter earlier today.

I, like all of you, first and foremost am a HUGE hockey fan. I live and breathe the game. Have since I was 3. It hurts to see this happen to the best game on earth, the best athletes and the best fans in the world. The players are doing the best we can to return this game to the Ice. But it takes two to make a deal. It just seems the other side isnt willing to make it work. It hurts.

Angry? Yes. Frustrated? Yes. Decently dictated? Yes.

Frustration is beyond prevalent. Everyones feeling it. But theres a fine line between venting and vindictiveness. Some lines shouldnt be crossed.

On a scale of 1-10, Tarik Cohen says his dangerous level is 12

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USA Today

On a scale of 1-10, Tarik Cohen says his dangerous level is 12

Don't be fooled by Tarik Cohen's height. He has towering confidence and he's setting up to have a big role in coach Matt Nagy's offense in 2018.

“On a scale of 1-10, the dangerous level is probably 12,” Cohen said Thursday at Halas Hall about the impact he can have in the Bears' new system. “Because in backyard football, it’s really anything goes, and it’s really whoever gets tired first, that’s who’s going to lose. I’m running around pretty good out here, so I feel like I’m doing a good job.”

Cohen proved last season he can thrive in space. He made an impact as a runner, receiver and return man and will have a chance at an even bigger workload this fall, assuming he can handle it.

With Jordan Howard established as the starting running back, Cohen knows his touches will come in a variety of ways.

“It might not necessarily be rushes,” he said. “But it’s going to be all over the field, and that’s what I like to do. Any way I can get the ball or make a play for my team, that’s what I’m looking forward to doing.”

Cohen averaged 4.3 yards-per-carry as a rookie and led all NFL running backs in the percentage of carries that went for at least 15 yards. He's a big play waiting to happen.

Howard can't get too comfortable in his first-team role. He's a few bad series from Cohen unseating him as the starter and becoming the most valuable weapon in Nagy's offense. The first-year coach is already having trouble hiding his excitement over Cohen, an emotion that will only grow once training camp gets underway.

Summer of Sammy: Sosa's 10th, 11th homers in 1998

Summer of Sammy: Sosa's 10th, 11th homers in 1998

It's the 20th anniversary of the Summer of Sammy, when Sosa and Mark McGwire went toe-to-toe in one of the most exciting seasons in American sports history chasing after Roger Maris' home run record. All year, we're going to go homer-by-homer on Sosa's 66 longballs, with highlights and info about each. Enjoy.

Sosa is heating up, but even a red-hot Sosa doesn't automatically equal wins for the Cubs.

Slammin' Sammy notched his first multi-homer game in 1998 in a 9-5 loss to Kevin Millwood and the Atlanta Braves. Sosa drove in 4 of the Cubs' 5 runs on a solo shot in the 4th inning and a three-run shot in the 8th. 

Sosa tallied 830 feet of homers in the game, with his first blast going 410 feet and the second shot measured at 420 feet.

The big game bumped Sosa's overall season slash line to .337/.411/.551 (.962 OPS) with 11 homers and 35 RBI.

Fun fact: Mickey Morandini hit second for the Cubs in this game and went 4-for-4, but somehow only scored one run despite hitting just in front of Sosa all game. That's because Morandini was caught stealing to end the 3rd inning, leaving Sosa to lead off the 4th inning with a solo blast.