NCAA Talk

DePaul women make Sweet 16 after beating Louisville

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DePaul women make Sweet 16 after beating Louisville

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Jessica January's strong start put her team ahead but it was her last point that sent DePaul to the Sweet 16.

January scored 18 of her season-high 25 points in the first half and No. 6 seed DePaul held off third-seeded Louisville 73-72 on Sunday in the second round of the women's NCAA tournament.

The junior guard's final point was the decisive margin as she made the second of two free throws with 14.5 seconds left. She also had eight rebounds and five assists.

''It's all the credit is to my teammates that were getting me the ball,'' January said. ''And just feeling comfortable and feeling like my teammates trust me to take shots.''

That trust was well-earned as DePaul (27-8) now heads to Dallas, its third Sweet 16 since 2011 and fourth in coach Doug Bruno's 30-year tenure.

Louisville (26-8) trailed by 10 with 8:36 to play but fought back to tie the game at 69 with 2:51 remaining.

 

Briahanna Jackson led the Cardinals with scored 20 points, 16 in the second half. Her reverse layup again tied the game at 72 with 15 seconds left. She fouled out attempting a steal on the following inbounds, sending January to line.

Louisville had the chance for the win but Myisha Hines-Allen was called for a charge with 1.7 seconds left after driving to the basket.

''We have ran that play before and it was just — I couldn't finish the shot,'' said Hines-Allen, the Atlantic Coast Conference player of the year.

[RELATED: Blue Demons rout James Madison in NCAA Tournament opener]

DePaul advanced the ball with a timeout.The Cardinals stole the inbounds pass but Mariya Moore's three-quarter court heave was well short.

Ashton Millender scored 12 points for DePaul — hitting all five shots — as did Chanise Jenkins, who had 10 in the second half.

Only six Cardinals scored. Asia Durr had 15 points, seven coming early in the fourth quarter comeback. Hines-Allen and Moore each had 14.

Louisville trailed by 67-57 after January converted a three-point play, but rallied to tie it.

The Cardinals had multiple chances to take the lead in the final minute while playing in front of a home crowd of 7,515. Hines-Allen missed a jumper with 36 seconds left and Jackson could not convert the putback after grabbing an offensive rebound.

Louisville trailed 40-32 at half but made its first five field goals in the third quarter, including three 3s, to cut the DePaul's lead to 1 with 6:47 left in the third quarter.

NCAA is taking steps to allow student-athletes to make money off their likeness

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USA TODAY

NCAA is taking steps to allow student-athletes to make money off their likeness

Bulls rookie guard Coby White has talent, an infectious smile and an afro that makes him stand out on the court. It’s a fair bet he could have made some money off his likeness while he played at North Carolina if the rules allowed it.

The NCAA is taking steps towards allowing its athletes to do so, but there’s still a long way to go in the process. The organization’s Board of Governors unanimously voted to start the process. That vote moves things to the NCAA’s three divisions “to consider updates to relevant bylaws and policies,” as it was worded in the NCAA's press release.

“We must embrace change to provide the best possible experience for college athletes,” said Michael V. Drake, the chair of the board and president of Ohio State. “Additional flexibility in this area can and must continue to support college sports as a part of higher education. This modernization for the future is a natural extension of the numerous steps NCAA members have taken in recent years to improve support for student-athletes, including full cost of attendance and guaranteed scholarships.”

The board asked each division (Division I, Division II, Division III) to make any new rules immediately and no later than January 2021.

It’s important to note that none of the changes are final, or even imminent. It’s still relevant that the NCAA is going through the process at all, after being so strongly in favor of amateurism across the board for its student-athletes.

The potential changes would not allow for compensation based on performance or participation in a sport. Of course, the natural grey area is that higher performing athletes will be more marketable so they would be compensated on performance indirectly.

This comes after California passed legislation to allow college athletes to receive endorsement/sponsorship money and other states are pursuing similar.

This is still far from being official or finalized, but it will continue to be a major story in college sports over the next couple years.

Dave Leitao suspended 3 games, DePaul put on 3-year probation

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USA TODAY

Dave Leitao suspended 3 games, DePaul put on 3-year probation

The DePaul men's basketball team has been placed on three-year probation and head coach Dave Leitao has been suspended three games for the 2019-20 season, the NCAA announced on Tuesday.

The program was found guilty of "failing to promote an atmosphere of compliance while Leitao did not "prevent violations from occurring in his program."

A Division I Committee on Infractions panel concluded that a "former DePaul associate head coach violated NCAA ethical conduct rules when he knowingly directed the former assistant director of basketball operations to provide impermissible recruiting benefits to a recruit."

The NCAA found that three coaches knew about the situation but failed to report the infractions. DePaul will vacate all wins earned while the ineligible player competed and suffer recruiting restrictions. They were also fined $5,000 plus 1% of the men's basketball program budget.

In 2019, DePaul had their first winning season since 2007 by going 19-17.