White Sox

New Coaching Options for 2010 Bears

New Coaching Options for 2010 Bears

Sunday, November 29th

I am trying folks! Like I stated in an earlier Blog "I'm a glass is half full kind a guy", but it is becoming more and moredifficult drawing positives during a Bears season spiraling out of control. Here's one, "There's always next year"! But I've got one better, there are a lot of good Offensive Coordinators, QB coaches, and even some 'A' lister head coachesavailable this off season if the Bears decide to make some changes.Clearly, the dollars investedin Jay Cutler dictatethat he is the QB of the future. The front office of the Bears now has to build around him and it may start with a new play caller. Here are some early thoughts on who may be available:The 'A' listers we know about. Mike Shannahan, Bill Cowher, Mike Holmgren, Jon Gruden to name a few. They are only coming if they get full power and the Bears organization decides to make a change at the Head Coaching position. Otherwise, forget it.

Offensive CoordinatorsCharlie Weis - Maybe this hits too close to home because of hisfailures at Notre Dame as the head man, but Charlie was one of the better play callers I have ever been around. He is very demanding, detailed, and expects perfection from all offensive personnel. He can be tough to handle as a QB, thus, the Bears would need to hire an excellent QB coach to be a buffer betweenCharlie and Jay. Super Bowl victories are under his belt.Chan Gailey - Former Chiefs OC, Head Coach at Georgia Tech, Head Coach of Dallas Cowboys, Steelers and Denver OC. Chan is an excellent teacher and can bring along young QB's. He coached me in Pittsburgh and I thought he made the game easy how he broke it down. Chan stresses situational play from the QB spot.He worked miracles in Kansas City last year whenhe switched to a "Pistol" offense midseason whenTyler Thigpen became their starting QB. Tyler had never started an NFL game. Look up Tyler's numbers, and how KC performed offensively when he started to play, they are impressive. Super Bowl appearances and victories are under his belt as well.Mike Martz - I thought the Bears want to get off the bus running! I do like Martz'sfast break style and his offense has won Super Bowls as well. The Bears will need to run the football just due to weather concerns late in the year and it is not a priority for Martz. He is another demanding offensive coach, but his stops other places suggest Mike does not work well with others. He's clashed with front office personnel along with his fellow coaches on all his stops.Up andComersDarrel Bevel (Minnesota OC) - That's right! Steal from your enemy the Minnesota Vikings. Darrel has done a nice job with Farve and Tavarus Jackson incorporating what they do well and what to avoid. Also, think of the impact their rookies have made up in Minnesota and how other playmakers have emerged. PercyHarvin and Sydney Rice may both make thePro Bowl. Bevel is aMidwest guy as heplayed QB at Wisconsin and hascoached for Green Bay (QB coach), and now OC Minnesota the last two years. Kyle Shannahan (Houston OC) - This guy is awesome! They have no running game to speak of down in Houston, but Matt Shaub is lighting it up. He has brought the young Shaub along intoa top 10 NFL QB (numbers are sick!)and obviously his ties to Mike Shannahan would go over "Big Time" with Jay. It would be the same offense Jay ran in Denver. Jeremy Bates (OC USC) - This dudes a grinder! He learned underJon Gruden. Jeremy was Jay's OC last year out in Denver. They have a great relationship and Jeremy also brings the offense Jay knows best. Kyle and Darrel would require a new title other than just OC because the NFL does not allow lateral moves.Most teams get around this loophole withtagging a new coach as"Consultant" or "Assistant Head Coach".Is your glass half full yet or did you just slam itto drown your 2009 sorrows?

White Sox Talk Podcast: Manny Machado Mania

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: Manny Machado Mania

Manny Machado to the White Sox?? It's been the dream for many White Sox fans for months.

With Machado in town to the play the White Sox, Chuck Garfien and Vinnie Duber discuss the White Sox chances of signing the soon-to-be-free agent.

Garfien also talks with Nicky Delmonico who played with Machado and fellow free agent to be Bryce Harper on the U.S.A. 18-under national team.

Listen to the full episode at this link or in the embedded player below:

Rick Renteria issues another benching after Welington Castillo doesn't hustle on popup

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USA TODAY

Rick Renteria issues another benching after Welington Castillo doesn't hustle on popup

One thing you better do if you play for Rick Renteria is run to first base.

Yet again, Renteria benched one of his players Monday for the sin of not hustling down the line.

Welington Castillo, a veteran, not a developing player in need of ample “learning experiences,” popped up to first base with two runners on and nobody out in the sixth inning of Monday’s eventual 3-2 loss to the visiting Baltimore Orioles. He did not run down to first, instead staying at home plate.

So when the inning ended and the White Sox took the field, Castillo stayed in the dugout.

Ricky’s boys don’t quit, or so the slogan goes. But what happens when a player doesn’t live up to that mantra? What happens when they don’t play their absolute hardest for all 27 outs, as the T-shirts preach? This is what happens. A benching.

“It was towering fly ball in the infield at first, probably had 15, 20 seconds of hangtime,” Renteria explained after the game. “I assumed the dropped ball. It has occurred. He could, at minimum, at least start moving that way.

“That’s uncharacteristic of him, to be honest, it truly is. Maybe he was just frustrated in that he had the fly ball and just stayed at the plate, but there was no movement toward first at all. And you guys have heard me talk to all the guys about at least giving an opportunity to move in that particular direction.

“Everybody says, ‘Well, 99 out of (100) times he’s going to catch that ball.’ And then that one time that he doesn’t, what would I do if the ball had been dropped? Would it have made it easier to pull him? Well, it was just as easy because you expect not the best, but the worst.

“That is uncharacteristic of that young man. I had a quick conversation with him on the bench, and he knew and that was it.”

It might seem a little overdramatic, a little nutty, even, to sit down a veteran catcher brought in this offseason to provide some offense and to do it in a one-run game. But this rebuild is about more than just waiting around for the minor league talent to make its way to the South Side. It’s about developing an organizational culture, too. And Renteria feels that if he lets this kind of thing slide at the big league level, that won’t send the right message to those precious prospects who will one day fill out this lineup.

“There’s one way to do it, you get your action, you start moving toward that direction in which you’ve got to go,” Renteria said. “What would’ve happened if everybody’s watching it — and I’m setting the tone for not only here, our club, (but also for) everybody in the minor leagues — and they’re saying, ‘Well, at the top, they said they’re going to do this and then they don’t do it.’

“It’s really simple. And people might like it, not like it. I’ve got to do this, do that so everybody understands what we’re trying to do here. We’re not done with what we’re trying to do.”

This isn’t the first time this has happened in 2018. Avisail Garcia was taken out of a game during spring training for not giving maximum effort. Leury Garcia was removed from a game earlier this month for not busting it down the first-base line on a weak grounder that went right to the first baseman.

It’s become a somewhat common tactic for Renteria, and while it might strike some as taking things a little too seriously, what good is this developmental season if a culture goes undeveloped? The White Sox have placed their bright future, in part, in Renteria’s hands, and they’ve talked glowingly about how the players have bought into his style and how the team played last season under his leadership.

If Renteria truly is the right man for the rebuild, things like this are how he’s going to establish his culture. And it will, he hopes, impact how all those prospects play when they’re no longer prospects and the White Sox are contending for championships.