Cubs

A new definition of 'Tebowing'

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A new definition of 'Tebowing'

Tebowing is defined as the action of getting down on one knee and praying, even if everyone else around you is doing something different.

Avid Denver Broncos fan Jared Kleinstein coined the term after watching former Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow spark another comeback victory over the Miami Dolphins in 2011. Tebow threw two touchdown passes and a two point conversion to force overtime. The Broncos prevailed in OT off the foot of kicker Matt Prater, who sealed the 18-15 victory. Kleinstein became a believer and launched tebowing.com the very next day.

However, when dissecting recent statements from wide receivers Eric Decker and Demaryius Thomas, there seemed to have been a different definition of Tebowing formulating within the Broncos' locker room.

I will preface their comments with saying I personally witnessed Tim Tebow wear out his receiving core, just while playing catch prior to stretch in Denvers 2010 training camp. This happened before practices even began during Tebow's first rookie camp. One throw would be off the shoe strings, the next, three feet high, forcing the receiver to jump and make an acrobatic catch. I walked away thinking the Broncos receivers were working miracles during warm-ups alone. Tebow didnt get any better throughout the entire two and a half hour practice. It was ugly and painful to watch. Adding insult to injury, Broncos fans would boo receivers for not hauling in Cirque De Soleil receptions play after play.

Thomas recently appeared on SportsRadioInterviews.com after the trading of Tim Tebow to the New York Jets saying, I aint going to say I was sad because the only thing they remember is that pass.

Thomas was referring to the game winning touchdown pass Tebow threw to Thomas during the Broncos' overtime playoff victory against the Steelers last year.

You gotta go back and look at the rest of the games," Thomas said. "I wasnt getting no balls and you had to make some of these plays where some players were open and he is not making throws, but I dont want to talk bad about Tim. But hey, I am happy we got Peyton.

Thomas went on to say, You would have people calling him out saying, 'Tim you gotta make that throw. You gotta read the defenses better.'

Thomas' comments are about as damning as it gets from an NFL teammate.

I think many of us have experience dealing with co-workers failing to perform a task at hand. Overall, everyone just bites the bullet and picks up the slack through shear self preservation to get the job done. But former teammates of Tebow are not shy about their defining moments with him, as well as and what the future may hold with Broncos new quarterback and future Hall of Famer, Peyton Manning.

Broncos wide receiver Eric Decker joined ESPNs Colin Cowherd to discuss how differently this offseason has been working with Manning so far. Decker described Peytons accuracy saying, Throwing it great, hitting you in the right spot.

With the subtle jabs by Thomas and Decker at their former quarterback, it seems to be their time to wear Tim Tebow out through the media.

Decker continued raving about Peyton Manning, stating, Hes such a perfectionist. If he hits you in the belly button, he gets mad at himself for not hitting you in the chest. Its unbelievable to be around a guy who has those standards for himself.

I am one who does believe the Broncos wide receivers' prayers have been answered.

Cubs Talk Podcast: The Emergency Kyle Hendricks Extension Podcast

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USA TODAY

Cubs Talk Podcast: The Emergency Kyle Hendricks Extension Podcast

Luke Stuckmeyer, David Kaplan, and Kelly Crull react to the breaking news of Kyle Hendricks' extension with the Cubs. The trio discusses how the deal is a win for both sides (1:30), Hendricks' unique place in Cubs history and on this season's roster (7:30), what Kyle's ceiling as a pitcher has turned out to be (12:00), and who the next Cub to sign an extension might be (14:30).

Listen to the full podcast here or via the embedded player below:

Bears notes: Are James Daniels, Cody Whitehair headed for a position swap?

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USA Today

Bears notes: Are James Daniels, Cody Whitehair headed for a position swap?

PHOENIX — Matt Nagy hinted Tuesday the Bears could have James Daniels and Cody Whitehair swap positions on the interior of their offensive line, moving Daniels to center and Whitehair to left guard. 

It was a noticeable change in tone from Nagy about where both those players may best fit on the offensive line. In the days and weeks after the Bears drafted Daniels in the second round of 2018’s NFL Draft, Nagy was adamant Whitehair would stay at center despite Daniels starring at that position while in college at Iowa. Whitehair, while being a steady presence at center for the last three seasons, began his pro career as a guard before a last-minute switch to center after the Bears signed Josh Sitton a few days before the 2016 season began. 

“We’re kind of in the middle of that right now looking at how they played at those particular positions — not just those two, but everybody,” Nagy said. “And so we’re going to stay open to that and if we feel like it’s going to be better to switch somebody we’ll do that, and if we don’t then we’ll stick with where we’re at.”

If the Bears do execute that switch, it would represent the only change to their starting offensive line from 2018. All five regular starters are returning this year, with Daniels and Whitehair being joined by tackles Charles Leno and Bobby Massie and guard Kyle Long. 

Harry Hiestand’s group was one of the league’s best pass-protecting offensive lines, though the Bears frequently struggled to run the ball with any consistent success. Perhaps swapping Daniels and Whitehair could be a way to help generate improvements on the ground. 

Organized Team Attendance 

Nagy said the Bears expect all their players to show up for the team's offseason program, which begins April 15, and into OTAs in May. Only one player — wide receiver Anthony Miller (shoulder) — who expected to participate in the voluntary shorts-and-helmets practices of OTAs. 

Nagy cited that 100 percent attendance as another sign of the strong culture permeating Halas Hall. 

“They’ll be there,” Nagy said. “Again, that’s who we are. I’m not worried about one guy not showing up.”

Comp Pick USA

The Bears haven’t been awarded a compensatory draft pick — given to teams who, essentially, lose more important players than they sign in free agency — since 2009, but that could change in 2020 with Adrian Amos and Bryce Callahan landing sizable contracts with the Green Bay Packers and Denver Broncos, respectively. 

Part of the Bears’ comp pick drought has been because of an aggressive approach to free agency. The team could’ve, perhaps, received a 2018 comp pick after losing Alshon Jeffery to free agency in 2017, but instead signed Mike Glennon, Prince Amukamara, Markus Wheaton, Dion Sims, Quintin Demps and Kendall Wright, among others. 

The other issue has been, simply, the Bears haven’t had many good players recently. And when their own good players did become free agents, the team’s roster wasn’t healthy enough to let them sign elsewhere, nor was their cap maxed out to prevent them from being brought back. 

That changed in 2018, and the departures of Amos and Callahan, as well as guys like Josh Bellamy, Kevin White, Eric Kush and Bryan Witzmann signing elsewhere, could help trigger an end to that comp pick drought. OverTheCap estimates the Bears could receive fourth- and fifth-round picks for Amos and Callahan, though Pace cautioned that the formula to determine the awarding of those picks is complicated and subject to change. 

Still, as the Bears move forward, the top of their roster — Mitch Trubisky, Eddie Jackson, etc. — will get more expensive. And staying competitive while allocating a significant amount of cap space to a few players is massively helped by drafting well. Adding a few comp picks in the future will give the Bears more spins of the wheel as they look to add cheap, productive talent to their roster. 

“We kind of knew going into free agency that was a possibility,” Pace said. “Now there’s things that take place and they’re even talking about tweaking some of the — the equation’s complicated enough. One of the things I think is those guys have to be on those teams for 10-plus games, for example, so you’re never really set until the season unfolds. 

“But it’s something we’re mindful of. I think a lot of the good clubs, you see the Rams doing it, they figure out a way to take advantage of that system and for us the key is to continue to draft well and we’ll be in a position for these compensatory picks.” 

London Calling

While Nagy said he hasn’t made any decisions yet on the Bears’ travel plans for their game in London against the Oakland Raiders, it sounded like he’s leaning toward having his team have a shorter across the Atlantic Ocean. Nagy cited the Kansas City Chiefs’ trip to London in 2015 — when he was the team’s quarterbacks coach — for which the team left the United States for England on Thursday, held a practice Friday and played the game Sunday. 

Other teams have opted to leave earlier and hold more practices in England. It’s worth noting that Doug Pederson — the Chiefs’ offensive coordinator in 2015 — had the Philadelphia Eagles fly to England the Thursday before their Sunday game against the Jacksonville Jaguars at Wembley Stadium in 2018. 

Nagy said he wants to allow his players some time to soak in London, but that certainly won’t be the primary goal of the trip. 

“It'll be 90 percent football and just a sprinkle (of other activities),” Nagy said. “We're over there on a business trip, that's why we're there. But at the same time it's great culture for the guys to see and be a part of and some guys have never been over there. That's a part of life. If you can balance it and make sure you do it the right way, I'm good with that.”

Lastly, the best thing we saw this week...

… By far was Andy Reid’s Bitmoji, which Nagy shared with a group of Chicago-based media during the league’s coaches breakfast Tuesday morning. Specifically, the Bitmojis we saw were of Reid's character in a Tommy Bahama Hawaiian shirt and him chowing down on a sizable stack of pancakes. 

Nagy, too, has a Bitmoji, and lamented the social media platform not having a visor option to put on his avatar, which looks like this: