NCAA Talk

Notre Dame's Floyd 'grateful' to stay in school

Notre Dame's Floyd 'grateful' to stay in school

Saturday, April 9, 2011
Posted: 4:56 p.m.

Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. -- Suspended Notre Dame wide receiver Michael Floyd cleared the first hurdle in his bid to return to the team when a disciplinary panel allowed him to stay at the school.

"I'm grateful that I still have a chance to earn my degree from Notre Dame and be a member of the football team," Floyd said in a statement Saturday, a day after his hearing before the Office of Residence Life.

"I'm sorry again for the poor decisions I've made and for letting so many people down," Notre Dame receiver Michael Floyd said.

Coach Brian Kelly suspended the star wideout on March 21, the day after he was arrested on suspicion of drunken driving. It was Floyd's third run-in with the law over alcohol since 2009. He has a May 2 court date.

"I know that I still need to meet the requirements set by the university and Coach Kelly, and that I have a lot of work to do that and to prove that I've grown from this experience," Floyd said. "I'm sorry again for the poor decisions I've made and for letting so many people down."

Kelly had no "drop-dead" date for a decision on whether he will reinstate Floyd, Notre Dame's career leader in touchdown catches (28). The senior ranks second in school history in catches (171) and third in receiving yards (2,539).

"I can only comment on what I do as a football program," Kelly said during a news conference Saturday. "And, as you know, Michael is suspended, and that is indefinite. This is not about anything except how I handle our players."

Kelly emphasized that Floyd has a long way to go before he can return to the team.

"Everybody has jumped to conclusions that Mike Floyd is going to play football. Mike has so many things on his plate that he has to handle before he can even think about football," the coach said. "Academics, and personally, he's got a lot of things in front of him that he has to go through before we even start thinking about football."

"So it's a fluid situation, every day and I am talking to him to make sure that very day he takes the right steps to get his degree and personally he has to take care of things that we have talked about."

Details of Friday's hearing or conditions imposed on Floyd were not disclosed.

"There is a stated alcohol guideline that I have used over 22 years that I think is an effective way to educate and teach how to make good decisions," Kelly said. "And it's not just me. It is the utilization of the resources that we have. I'm not a professional counselor when it comes to these things, but I'm pretty good at reaching out and finding the people that can come up with those answers.

"... Football is not even in the equation right now, it can't be."

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Dave Leitao suspended 3 games, DePaul put on 3-year probation

daveleitaodepaulslidenew.jpg
USA TODAY

Dave Leitao suspended 3 games, DePaul put on 3-year probation

The DePaul men's basketball team has been placed on three-year probation and head coach Dave Leitao has been suspended three games for the 2019-20 season, the NCAA announced on Tuesday.

The program was found guilty of "failing to promote an atmosphere of compliance while Leitao did not "prevent violations from occurring in his program."

A Division I Committee on Infractions panel concluded that a "former DePaul associate head coach violated NCAA ethical conduct rules when he knowingly directed the former assistant director of basketball operations to provide impermissible recruiting benefits to a recruit."

The NCAA found that three coaches knew about the situation but failed to report the infractions. DePaul will vacate all wins earned while the ineligible player competed and suffer recruiting restrictions. They were also fined $5,000 plus 1% of the men's basketball program budget.

In 2019, DePaul had their first winning season since 2007 by going 19-17. 

What do the Bears have in their running backs? They’re about to find out

david_montgomery_terms.jpg
USA Today

What do the Bears have in their running backs? They’re about to find out

The Bears were pleased with what they saw from their overhauled running back room during non-padded OTA and minicamp practices during the spring, but consider that an incomplete evaluation. 

David Montgomery, in particular, impressed with his quickness, athleticism and route running. Nothing Mike Davis showed dissuaded the team from believing in the free agent signing’s untapped potential. Positive things were said about seventh-round pick Kerrith Whyte Jr. and second-year undrafted free agent Ryan Nall. 

The only running back returning from 2018’s unit is Tarik Cohen. But while Ryan Pace, Matt Nagy and the Bears’ talent evaluators did their homework on their new players, they won’t really get to see what they have until the pads come on in Bourbonnais (Nagy expects the first padded practice of training camp to be Sunday). 

“I know (Montgomery) kept asking coach, ‘when do we put the pads on?” Pace said. “And so we’re to that point. One of his greatest strengths is his contact balance and his ability to break tackles, and now we’re at a point where that can be showcased.”

It’s one thing for a rookie to stand out during OTAs and minicamp. Tight end Adam Shaheen did two years ago, bodying up NFL-caliber defenders to make some impressive plays in those non-padded practices. But he faded when pads came on in training camp and didn’t play a significant role in 2017’s dour offense. 

The Bears believe Montgomery’s ability to break tackles — he forced the most missed tackles among FBS running backs in 2018 with 99, per Pro Football Focus — will translate to the NFL, giving their ground game a dimension it didn’t have in 2018. Jordan Howard avoided 22 tackles on rushing attempts last year, 28th in the NFL and nearly half the total of Kareem Hunt. Hunt appeared in 11 games (five fewer than Howard) before the Kansas City Chiefs released him after video surfaced of him pushing and kicking a woman; Montgomery’s style of play has favorably been compared to Hunt’s.  

As for Davis, Pace said: “I think I feel like he’s a little bit under the radar right now. Mike’s had a great offseason and we’re fortunate to have him. That’s a strong room — we talk about the receivers, we feel the same way about the running back room. And Mike Davis is a real important part of that.”

The Bears feel like Montgomery, Davis and Cohen leading their running back room will allow them to be less predictable and more efficient on offense. Last year, Howard carried the ball two-thirds of the time he was on the field, while he was targeted with a pass on just six percent of his plays. Yet no skill position player (except Mitch Trubisky, of course) was more involved in the Bears’ offense last year — 33 percent of the Bears’ total plays involved Howard. 

All three of the Bears’ top running backs in 2019 will be expected to catch passes out of the backfield as well as running the ball with a blend of efficiency and explosiveness. We’ll begin to find out this week in Bourbonnais if Pace’s overhaul of that corner of his depth chart will produce the results the Bears’ offense needs.