Bears

For now, Dempster sticking with Cubs

718510.png

For now, Dempster sticking with Cubs

PITTSBURGH The Cubs appeared to put out the media firestorm, but that doesnt mean Ryan Dempster wont be traded at some point.

Dempster still seemed to be processing all the rumors when he showed up at PNC Park on Monday afternoon. He joked that if its on the Internet, it must be true, but otherwise declined to discuss a potential deal with the Atlanta Braves. He said he had to get ready for his next start and went through his normal workouts.

Manager Dale Sveum found out when he was coming off the field from early batting practice before Monday nights game against the Pittsburgh Pirates. He called the higher-ups in the front office and was told nothings happening.

More than once, assistant general manager Randy Bush said: There is nothing to report. Word first leaked out of Atlantas MLB.com site, and then multiple outlets jumped on the bandwagon, confirming a done deal.

"The Twitter, the Facebook, the things that get produced and published that aren't true is just off the charts, Sveum said, because theres so many media avenues for that. Unfortunately, its gonna happen and its not gonna go away."

The same holds true for Matt Garza, who is still pushing to make his next start after experiencing cramps in his right triceps. Garza and Paul Maholm have been mentioned frequently in trade speculation, which could gut the Cubs rotation. Sveum set impossible odds that the Cubs would trade Dempster, Garza and Maholm before the July 31 deadline.

With 10-and-5 no-trade rights, Dempster holds the hammer and can decide where he wants to pitch. Stay tuned.

Roquan Smith helps shear a sheep at Bears community event

Roquan Smith helps shear a sheep at Bears community event

Roquan Smith has more sheared sheep than tackles on his stat sheet as a pro football player.

Smith and several other Bears rookies participated in a hands-on community event at Lambs Farm in Libertyville, Illinois on Monday where he assisted farm staff with the sheep's grooming. Smith said it was a first for him despite growing up around animals. 

"It's like on the norm for me though, playing linebacker you're in the trenches," Smith said of the experience.

"Shaving a sheep, I never really envisioned myself doing something like that," Smith said via ChicagoBears.com. "I was around animals [growing up], but it was more so cows and goats here and there and dogs and cats. I've petted a sheep before, but never actually flipped one and shaved one."

Bears rookies got up close and personal with more than just sheep.

Smith was selected with the eighth overall pick in April's draft and will assume a starting role opposite Danny Trevathan at inside linebacker this season. Here's to hoping he can wrangle opposing ball-carriers like a sheep waiting to be sheared.

The Bears' defense is ahead of its offense, but Matt Nagy doesn't see that as a problem

5-21bearsplayersotas.jpg
USA Today Sports Images

The Bears' defense is ahead of its offense, but Matt Nagy doesn't see that as a problem

Asking players about how the defense is “ahead” of the offense is a yearly right of passage during OTAs, sort of like how every baseball team has about half its players saying they’re in the best shape of their life during spring training. So that Vic Fangio’s defense is ahead of Matt Nagy’s offense right now isn’t surprising, and it's certainly not concerning. 

But Nagy is also working to install his offense right now during OTAs to build a foundation for training camp. So does the defense — the core of which is returning with plenty of experience in Fangio’s system — being ahead of the offense hurt those efforts?

“It’s actually good for us because we’re getting an experienced defense,” Nagy said. “My message to the team on the offensive side is just be patient and don’t get frustrated. They understand that they’re going to play a little bit faster than us right now. We’ll have some growing pains, but we’ll get back to square one in training camp.”

We’ll have a chance to hear from the Bears’ offensive players following Wednesday’s practice, but for now, the guys on Fangio’s defense have come away impressed with that Nagy’s offense can be. 

“The offense is a lot … just very tough,” cornerback Prince Amukamara said. “They’re moving well. They’re faster. They’re throwing a lot of different looks at us and that’s just Nagy’s offense. If I was a receiver I would love to play in this offense, just because you get to do so many different things and you get so many different plays. It just looks fun over there.”

“They’re moving together, and I like to see that,” linebacker Danny Trevathan said. “We’re not a bad defense. They’re practicing against us, so they’re getting better every day, and vice versa. It’s a daily grind. It’s going to be tough, but those guys, they got the right pieces. I like what I see out there. When somebody makes a play, they’re gone. Everybody can run over there. It’s the right fit for Mitch, it’s the right fit for the receivers, the running backs.”

Still, for all the praise above, the defense is “winning” more, at least as much as it can without the pads on. But the offense is still having some flashes, even as it collectively learns the terminology, concepts and formations used by Nagy. 

And that leads to a competitive atmosphere at Halas Hall, led by the Bears’ new head coach. 

“He’s an offensive coach and last year coach (John) Fox, I couldn’t really talk stuff to (him) because he’s a defensive coach and it’s like Nagy’s offense so if I get a pick or something, I mean, I like to talk stuff to him,” Amukamara said. “He’ll say something like ‘we’re coming at you 2-0.’ Stuff like that. That just brings out the competition and you always want that in your head coach.”