Bears

Penn St. makes changes to its football jerseys

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Penn St. makes changes to its football jerseys

From Comcast SportsNet
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (AP) -- Players' names are being added to Penn State's football jerseys for the coming season, the university announced Tuesday, along with blue ribbons to show support for victims of child abuse. The team's generic look -- blue-and-white, no names on jerseys -- has long been a trademark and was associated with the buttoned-down style of former coach Joe Paterno, who was fired last year after his former assistant Jerry Sandusky was arrested on child molestation charges. School officials said adding the names was a way to recognize the "resolve and dedication" of the players, as the team faces a four-year bowl ban and loss of scholarships under the severe penalties handed down by the NCAA last month over the school's handling of the Sandusky scandal. The changes will take effect with the Sept. 1 season opener at home against Ohio University. "We want our fans to know and recognize these young men," said coach Bill O'Brien, who was hired after last season. "They have stuck together during tough times, and I commend them for the leadership they have shown." Fran Fisher, a longtime Penn State radio announcer, said the jersey changes may ruffle some feathers among former players, and the vanilla uniforms will continue to be associated with Paterno. "I think Coach O'Brien has a right to do whatever he wants to do to have an identity for his team," Fisher said. "I think that the plainness of the Paterno era will be remembered because he considered it to be a team sport." Sandusky, 68, awaits sentencing on 45 criminal counts, probably next month, and is likely to spend the rest of his life in state prison. Paterno died of lung cancer in January, and a university-commissioned investigation of the Sandusky scandal concluded he and other top Penn State officials concealed allegations against Sandusky going back to 1998. The NCAA also stripped the school and Paterno of more than 100 wins, dropping him from atop the list of the winningest coaches in major college football history.

Allen Robinson: 'I feel 100 percent. I'm ready to go'

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USA Today

Allen Robinson: 'I feel 100 percent. I'm ready to go'

The good news about Allen Robinson continues to pour in.

This time, it's from Robinson himself, who declared Thursday at Chicago Bears training camp that he's 100 percent healthy and ready to go for practice, which get underway Friday.

"I feel 100 percent. I'm ready to go," he said. "It was all about getting ready for this time right here."

Robinson, who GM Ryan Pace signed to a three-year, $42 million deal in free agency, said his responsibility is to make Mitch Trubisky's job easier.

"I want Mitch [Trubisky] to go out there and play free and it's my job to make his easy."

Robinson certainly made Blake Bortles' job easy in 2015 when he went off for 1,400 yards and 14 touchdowns. It's that kind of elite production that has Trubisky very excited about what the duo can do in Chicago. If Robinson can have that much success with a player like Bortles, who isn't exactly known for his accuracy, he should thrive with Trubisky whose throws hit the mark more often than not.

Coach Matt Nagy said the Bears are starting training camp healthy and that no players are expected on the PUP list. That's great news all around, but mostly for Robinson, whose long road to recovery finally appears behind him.

Jabari Parker channels his inner Uncle Drew: This game is about getting buckets

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USA TODAY

Jabari Parker channels his inner Uncle Drew: This game is about getting buckets

The Bulls gave Jabari Parker a two-year, $40 million deal for good reason.

One, the Bulls had the salary cap space to get the deal done and had just about filled out their roster. The money wasn't going to be used elsewhere. Also, the second year of the deal is a team option which gives the Bulls some security should Parker not be able to stay healthy or play up to the standards such a salary commands.

Parker was given that money for multiple reasons. One of those reasons was not for his defense.

But, according to Parker, no one gets paid for their defense.

Speaking on 670 The Score on Wednesday, Parker was asked about whether he felt he had the ability and effort to defend in the NBA, something he hasn't done particularly well in four seasons.

"I just stick to my strengths. Look at everybody in the league. They don’t pay players to play defense," Parker said. "There’s only two people historically that play defense. I’m not going to say I won’t, but to say that’s a weakness is like saying that’s everybody’s weakness. Because I’ve scored 30 and 20 on a lot of guys that say they play defense.

"If you know the game, you also know that everyone’s a pro, right? And you know that certain guys have an average. No matter what you do, they still get that average. They pay people to score the ball, and I would hope that somebody scores the ball on me if they pay them that much. So, I’m not saying that to cop out or nothing. It’s the NBA. We’re professionals. Everybody scores. It’s just about limiting them as much as you can, trying to contain them."

Parker's right in one sense, that players are usually paid for their offensive output. There are also more tangible, easily read statistics on the offensive end than there are defensively. Heck, the Bulls gave $80 million to Zach LaVine and he was the team's worst defender last season.

But then again, defense matters. A whole lot, especially at a time when offenses are better than ever (thus making defenders more valuable). The final four teams in last year's playoffs were ranked 1st, 6th, 9th and LeBron James (29th) in defensive efficiency.

A day after Parker's comments the Celtics gave Marcus Smart a four-year, $52 million contract. He's a career 37 percent shooter and has made 29 percenet of his 3-pointers in four seasons.

So while Parker, a below-average defender, might not be entirely accurate, at least he's owning who he is. And if he scores like he did in Year 3, averaging 20 points before re-tearing his ACL, no one will care how he defends.