Rajon Rondo

Development of Nets' Spencer Dinwiddie shows the importance of G League scouting for the Bulls

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USA TODAY

Development of Nets' Spencer Dinwiddie shows the importance of G League scouting for the Bulls

On Wednesday night the Bulls fell 96-93 to the Brooklyn Nets in a game dominated by point guard play. In the matchup, Kris Dunn—acquired by the Bulls in the ‘17 NBA Draft night trade of Jimmy Butler—had 24 points, 6 assists, 2 steals and only one turnover. But he was outplayed by Spencer Dinwiddie—he of the new three-year, $34 million contract—who turned in 27 points, 6 rebounds and 3 assists in the win.

Dinwiddie’s emergence can be attributed to his perseverance over several G League stints—including a stint with the Bulls G League affiliate— that saw him get a little bit better each year.

And the fact that the Nets didn’t blink at signing him to his new deal hints at the idea that he is a player who is very dedicated to putting in the work to seriously improve his game. The Bulls are hoping Dunn is the same way—and he has shown every indication of that this season—but they definitely missed out on Dinwiddie considering that he played for their G League affiliate Windy City Bulls in their inaugural season.

And that is why Dinwiddie is a perfect example of just how important G League scouting—especially of your affiliate—is so vital.

The standard line from many fans of a team when a player like Dinwiddie starts to turn into the best-case version of themselves on another squad is: “There was no way to see this coming.”

Or you will see a simple, congratulatory response like head coach Jim Boylen delivered on Tuesday night, “We’re happy for Dinwiddie.” And the Bulls should be happy, as no matter how big or small of a role played in his development, they definitely contributed to his formation to some extent. But the fact that he wasn’t on a two-way contract with the Bulls means that they would’ve had to act fast in giving him a look, lest another NBA team call him up, and that is exactly what happened when the Nets decided to sign Dinwiddie on December 8, 2016.

At the time Dinwiddie got his first opportunity with the Nets, the Bulls point guard rotation was Rajon Rondo, Michael Carter-Williams and Jerian Grant. So yeah, no exactly a “who’s who” of NBA point guards.

Chicago had Dinwiddie for the 2016-17 preseason, where despite not putting up big numbers in limited minutes, he played solidly. Over five preseason games he shot 58 percent from the field and showed a willingness to defend, posting solid steal and block rates. His numbers didn’t jump off the page but at 6-foot 6 it was safe to assume he could become a serviceable NBA player in some regard with some refinement on his jump shot.

Dinwiddie’s time on the Windy City Bulls was a brief nine-game stretch but in that time he played like a player who was ready to have a breakout season.

Over those nine games he averaged 19 points, 8 assists and 3 rebounds per game on 47 percent shooting. The biggest error on the Bulls end of things was not taking those numbers seriously. NBA-quality players put up great numbers in the G League because of their (obvious) higher physicality and/or skill level. And if you compare his numbers with the Windy City Bulls to his statistics during his other G League stints, it is obvious that he was an improving player with room to grow:

G League stats:

2014-15: 12 PPG, 5 APG, 3 RPG, 2 FTA per game

2015-16: 14 PPG, 6 APG, 3 RPG, 4 FTA per game

2016-17: 19 PPG, 8 APG, 3 RPG, 6 FTA per game

Dinwiddie’s development in the counting stats showed a player getting more comfortable with his shot and role on a team. But the free throw attempts are just as important--if not more--because they show a player who is becoming more aggressive, and in Dinwiddie’s case, becoming confident in their game.

And so fittingly, there was Dinwiddie, nailing 50 percent of his eight 3-point attempts and getting the game-winning steal and free throws to seal the win over the Bulls.


This all to say, the hope is that the Bulls front office is looking at the Windy City Bulls as a legitimate talent-pool, and not just a way to train coaches and/or additional staff. This is not the lone case of talent developing up in Hoffman Estates.

Chicago-native Alfonzo McKinnie plays about 15 minutes per game for the Warriors. He averaged 9 RPG for the Windy City Bulls in the 2016-17 season and showed signs of being able to extend his range, shooting 30 percent from the 3-point line after shooting 35 percent from 3-point range in college. He played in all 50 games for the Windy City Bulls in his lone season.

Jake Layman is playing about 15 MPG for the Trail Blazers and is shooting 36 percent from the 3-point line. He played on the 2016-17 Windy City Bulls team and scored 17 PPG over an eight game stretch with the team.

Neither McKinnie or Layman are going to develop into superstars. They may never carry a scoring load for their respective teams or even get to start more than a couple times in a season, but that isn’t that the point.

The (Chicago) Bulls are have historically built through the draft, with few free agent success stories sprinkled in. And in terms of recent history, the Bulls took a great first step in the right direction in their (latest) rebuild by getting a great return in the Jimmy Butler trade.

The next steps are going to be identifying and acquiring—whether it be through developing someone currently on the roster, the draft or free agency—a superstar and finding good role players to fit around those central figures. And the G League has emerged as perhaps the best (and most cost effective way) of doing finding latter.

And in the case of Dinwiddie, he is going to be a lot more than a good role player. So while it didn’t cost the Bulls anything to lose him, it still represents an opportunity missed on a guard who has yet to hit his prime.

But life goes on, and there will be other solid talents finding their way in the NBA G League, possibly on the Windy City Bulls. Hopefully, the (Chicago) Bulls spot them first.

Former Bulls in the playoffs: Kyle Korver gets hot as LeBron, Cavs top Raptors

Former Bulls in the playoffs: Kyle Korver gets hot as LeBron, Cavs top Raptors

Just about the only difference between the Kyle Korver who Bulls fans remember and the one playing in Toronto last night was that he didn't come off the bench.

Korver, a member of the original Bench Mob in Chicago in 2011, was one of the supporting cast members who picked up LeBron James and Kevin Love in Tuesday's Game 1 win over the Raptors in the Eastern Conference Semifinals.

The 37-year-old finished with 19 points, including five 3-pointers, and was a key cog in the third quarter as the Cavaliers tried to keep things close against the top-seeded Raptors.

Korver hit a pair of long jumpers with his foot on the 3-point line to get it going, and later in the period hit back-to-back 3-pointers to keep the Cavaliers afloat after Toronto had pushed its lead to 10 points.

Korver didn't score in the fourth quarter but was clutch in overtime, hitting a 3-pointer to get the extra period started that gave the Cavs the lead for good.

The 19 points were necessary on a night when James and Kevin Love combined to go 15 of 43. Korver has one distinct role on the Cavaliers: be shot-ready as soon as a James drive-and-kick finds him. In Game 1 he was 7 of 17 from the field with five 3-pointers, and both 2-pointers were jumpers.

He's been streaky in the postseason but did come up clutch in Round 1 against the Pacers. He scored 18 points in Game 4 to help the Cavs even up the series, and then the Cavs took a 3-2 series lead in Game 5 behind, in part, Korver's 19 points. He was held scoreless in Game 1 and 3 losses and had 6 and 3 points in Games 6 and 7 against the Pacers, so Ty Lue and the Cavs will have to hope his streaky shooting stays hot if they intend to knock off Raptors and advance to the conference finals.

Rajon Rondo: The Pelicans now trail the Warriors 2-0 in their best of seven series, but not because of Rondo. #PlayoffRondo was at it again with 22 points, seven rebounds, 12 assists and five steals in Game 2. He did commit seven turnovers but was otherwise great, even connecting on three 3-pointers and making all three of his free throws. Stopping the Warriors offense is another discussion, but Rondo is still putting up massive lines for the Pellies. Rondo was actually a +2 in the five-point loss.

Nikola Mirotic: A bounce-back performance for Threekola, who finished with 18 points and nine rebounds in the Game 2 loss.

Bulls in the playoffs: Nikola Mirotic can't miss and the Pelicans are up 3-0

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USA TODAY

Bulls in the playoffs: Nikola Mirotic can't miss and the Pelicans are up 3-0

When the Bulls traded Nikola Mirotic to the Pelicans on Feb. 1, the consensus belief was that the deal was a win-win for both sides.

That still may be true, but the way Mirotic has played the last two weeks has made invaluable to the Pelicans, who hold a commanding 3-0 lead on the Blazers following Thursday night's blowout win.

Mirotic was back at it again, scoring a playoff career-high 30 points on 12 of 15 shooting, making 4 of 6 3-poiners, and added eight rebounds, three steals and a block. Oh, and he did all this in 30 minutes.

Mirotic has been great in three games against the third-seeded Blazers, averaging 21.0 points, 9.0 rebounds, 1.7 steals and 2.3 blocks while shooting a ridiculous .585/.478/1.000.

But it's really been a two-week tear for Mirotic during the Pelicans' eight-game winning streak going back to the final 10 days of the regular season.

In those eight games Mirotic has averaged 24.0 points, 10.9 rebounds, 1.4 blocks, 1.4 steals and has shot 57 percent from the field.

The Bulls are happy to have the 22nd overall pick in June's draft, but at this rate would they rather have Mirotic still in the fold? He seems to have turned the corner. Remarkable stuff. At the very least, it's easy to root for him.

Rajon Rondo, Pelicans: #PlayoffRondo, who we featured two days ago, was also back at it in Game 3, going for 16 points on 7 of 12 shooting, five rebounds and 11 more assists. He now has a league-high 37 assists in three games against the Blazers and has played excellent defense on that dangerous Blazers backcourt. He's also shooting 50 percent from the field. This is incredible stuff.

Marco Belinelli, Sixers: More remarkable stuff from a player who was an afterthought until about a month ago. Belinelli, who played 52 games with the Hawks before his release, has exploded in the postseason with Philadelphia. He scored 21 points on 7 of 13 shooting and hit four more 3-pointers, giving him 10 in the series. The Sixers are up 2-1 thanks in large part to Belinelli's 20.7 points and 1.7 steals. He remains a key cog off the bench.