Bulls

Rangers coach takes some shots at the Devils

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Rangers coach takes some shots at the Devils

From Comcast SportsNet
NEW YORK (AP) -- John Tortorella stood out again at a playoff news conference. Only this time it was because of his feistiness toward the New Jersey Devils and not for his brevity and contentiousness with the media. The New York coach defended Rangers forward Brandon Prust, who was given a one-game suspension Sunday because of an elbow to the head of New Jersey defenseman Anton Volchenkov, and accused the Devils of embellishing to draw penalties in the Eastern Conference finals. "We tell our players, Don't stay down on the ice. Get up,'" Tortorella said Sunday. "I'll leave it at that. If we want to start discussing officials with the media, I have a long list here." He then began to air it. Tortorella said the Devils set picks during power plays to set up shots for Ilya Kovalchuk and prevent the Rangers from getting into position to block them. He added that forward Dainius Zubrus elbowed New York defenseman Anton Stralman on Saturday, and said top New Jersey forward Zach Parise launched himself into another defenseman, Michael Del Zotto. Neither of those players, nor Prust, was penalized for their hits during the Rangers' 3-0 win that gave New York a 2-1 lead in the East finals. Kovalchuk scored a power-play goal in Game 2 that the Rangers say was made possible by a pick. "We're trying not to get picked," Rangers forward Brad Richards said. "Sometimes you get picked. We're trying to let the refs know and have them look at it."

The long-awaited debut of the Bulls starting lineup, rusty Wendell Carter Jr. and all

The long-awaited debut of the Bulls starting lineup, rusty Wendell Carter Jr. and all

After getting a look at each point guard in the starting lineup this preseason, Jim Boylen finally got a look at what appears to be his starting lineup for Opening Night. 

Tomas Satoransky started as the point next to Zach LaVine, Otto Porter Jr., Lauri Markkanen, and Wendell Carter Jr. That group was down 10-7 when Carter subbed out at the 8:36 mark but looked better in later stints in the game. 

Carter was noticeably slow on his first step on his defense, specifically on plays where Raptors center Chris Boucher was able to use his speed and length advantage to finish at the rim. But he was solid on the glass, even chipping in on the offensive rebounding side of things, grabbing 3 offensive boards in the first half alone. 

Carter was clearly re-adjusting to the speed of NBA basketball and as play-by-play broadcaster Stacey King noted during the game, he "just doesn't have his legs underneath him." He was 1-6 from the floor, struggling to get lift as he went up for putback layups around the basket. 

That being said, he was decent, more so on the defensive side of the floor where he became more active as the game wore on.

In his 16-minutes stint, Carter posted 10 points, 7 rebounds, an assist and a block, while picking up 3 personal fouls. 

Outside of Carter's return stint, the Bulls new-look starting group looked solid and offers hope as we approach the start of the NBA regular season.

Lawrence Cherono outkicks second and third to win 2019 Chicago Marathon

Lawrence Cherono outkicks second and third to win 2019 Chicago Marathon

After 26.2 miles of winding through the packed streets of Chicago on a quintessential day to run, with unbeatable forty-degree fall temperatures, the men’s 2019 Chicago Marathon came down to one second.

Kenyan runner Lawrence Cherono outkicked Ethiopian runners Debela Dejene and Asefa Mengstu in the final 400 meters to win the men’s elite race. After running 26 miles and some change, the top three band of runners looked like they were coming down the home stretch of an 800-meter track race rather than the final minute of their endurance run.

Long-winded, yet determined to fight for first, Cherono, Dejene, and Mengstu finished within three seconds of each other – the closest podium finish in Chicago Marathon history. It was such a close margin that the entourage of people gathering around the finish and crowding Michigan Ave. had to crane their necks to see Cherono cross first. 

Some may have been surprised that British distance runner Mo Farah, last year’s champion, wasn’t in the mix. Farah competed again this year but finished more than four minutes off his winning time last year of 2:05:11.

Leading the men’s elite field this October, Cherono ran a 2:05:45, topping his winning time from April's Boston Marathon (2:07:57). He is the first man since 2006 to win both titles in the same year – the latter, secured in a second.