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Rose's injury changes Bulls' season, franchise's future

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Rose's injury changes Bulls' season, franchise's future

It was almost as if they already knew. Not just the severity of Derrick Rose's left-knee injury -- now confirmed as a torn ACL -- but in the Bulls' locker room, the somber feeling conveyed how grim the future would be.

What Kyle Korver called "saddest win" was indeed just that, a fitting, disastrous conclusion to the league's reigning MVP's injury-plagued campaign. Just when things began to look bright -- Rose was in the midst of a near triple-double performance in the opening game of the NBA playoffs, scoring 23 points, dishing out nine assists and snatching nine rebounds in a Game 1 rout over the 76ers -- the future of one of the game's brightest stars, as well as an entire franchise, changed when, with 1:20 left in the blowout win, Rose drove, left his feet and while in mid-air, before dropping off a pass to Carlos Boozer, crumpled to the ground after hearing something "pop" in the back of his knee, a source familiar with the situation told CSNChicago.com the All-Star point guard said afterwards.

In the short term, things won't be so bad, as the Bulls, as Tom Thibodeau is fond of saying, "have more than enough" to knock off the Sixers, who were simply unable to deal with the Bulls' size and multiple weapons, namely the dual threat of wings Luol Deng and Rip Hamilton. As brilliant as Rose was in Game 1, his outing was more of icing on the cake, as backup point guard C.J. Watson is a more than capable scorer and distributor, and the Bulls' stout defense won't be affected by their superstar's absence against the undersized, scoring-challenged Sixers.

But moving forward, assuming an experienced Boston squad gets by Atlanta, the tremendous depth of the Bulls might not be enough to survive the veteran Celtics, as Rose would be needed to at least cancel out point-guard counterpart Rajon Rondo, if not outplay him. During Rose's previous absences in the regular season -- including the season-ending knee injury, he suffered six separate setbacks over the course of the campaign -- Joakim Noah often said, "We need Derrick to get to where we want to get to," and he couldn't have been more correct.

Now, with Rose likely out for six months, if not more time, the Bulls' championship aspirations have to be put on hold. Don't forget, fellow All-Star Luol Deng postponed surgery on his left wrist in pursuit of a title this season and with his obligations to the British national team -- Great Britain is the host country for the upcoming Summer Olympics in his adopted hometown of London -- the Bulls will probably be without their two most significant players to start next season.

Rose probably needed to rest after this season, whether or not the Bulls made a title run, but while the Olympics aren't a big deal in the grand scheme of things, one has to wonder what kind of player he'll be after he returns. An ACL injury is no longer the death sentence it was for players' careers in the past, but at 23, Rose admittedly hasn't developed enough parts of his game that don't rely on his remarkable speed, explosiveness and athleticism to be a dominant force.

It's a fact that the Chicago native has a legendary work ethic and will put in long hours to recover his burst, as well as hone other parts of his game that will serve him well as an NBA veteran, something which would have happened even prior to the injury. However, when examining other marquee talents who have returned from major knee issues -- from big man Amar'e Stoudemire to former scoring champ Tracy McGrady and even Gilbert Arenas, all top-tier athletes -- it's clear that he has a long road ahead of him and there's no guarantee that he'll ever be the same player.

That said, as much as Thibodeau will be questioned for leaving Rose in a game that late with a double-digit lead -- something that he frequently does and came back to bite him, albeit in a less severe fashion, in last season's first-round series against the Pacers when Rose twisted his ankle -- the All-Star point guard could have hurt himself at any point in the game, as has been witnessed throughout the season. After missing 27 regular-season games and finding his groove against the Sixers, it's laughable that Rose would have asked out of the contest, though Bulls management might disagree.

If Thibodeau's lack of a contract extension was thought to be an issue before the injury, it will certainly be magnified now, as the front office has more ammunition to not extend him, give him a deal worthy of his coaching prowess or even opt to part ways. While there are playoff games left to be played, Rose's future has to be weighing heavily on the minds of an organization that made a significant investment in the homegrown product over the next five years, building a team around his unique abilities that has three other players -- Deng, Noah and Boozer -- also making eight-figure salaries per year for multiple seasons.

All of a sudden, the Bulls' championship window, believed to be open for years to come -- but certainly if not this season, the next -- looks a lot less open, unless Rose fully recovers from his injury much faster and better than most cases, something that can't be put past him, but won't be encouraged, as both the Bulls and his camp will preach patience. The problem is, in this trying season, in which Rose routinely has said, "God does everything for a reason," he's already shown the patience of Job.

From last season's Eastern Conference Finals loss to Miami through the waning moments of Saturday's game, even through all of Rose's litany of injuries, the prevailing thought was the worst-case scenario for the Bulls this season would be again falling short of the NBA Finals, due to not being able to get by the rival Heat for the second consecutive year.

Now, ending the season in that manner -- instead of, for all intents and purposes, it ending with 1:20 remaining in Game 1 of the first round -- would seem like a blessing.

Thumb injury leaves Wendell Carter Jr. on the outside looking in at NBA All-Rookie teams

Thumb injury leaves Wendell Carter Jr. on the outside looking in at NBA All-Rookie teams

Wendell Carter Jr. was on his way to becoming the second consecutive Bulls player to make an All-Rookie Team, but a thumb injury that required surgery in January ultimately proved to be the deciding factor in his omission.

The All-Rookie Teams were announced on Tuesday afternoon and, as expected, Carter was not on either. The seventh overall pick had a promising rookie campaign in which he averaged 10.3 points, 7.0 rebounds and 1.3 blocks per game. Those marks ranked 10th, 4th and 2nd, respectively, among first-year players.

But Carter's thumb injury limited him to just 44 games. Of the 10 players who made the first and second teams, Memphis' Jaren Jackson Jr. played the fewest games (58) while the group averaged 72.8 games played.

Carter's thumb injury was initially diagnosed as a jam, but further testing revealed that surgery was the best course of action for the then-19-year-old (he turned 20 in April). The Bulls opted not to rush Carter back at the end of the season - a wise decision on multiple levels - and Carter, when he spoke with media members for the first time after undergoing surgery, said his goals had moved to the long-term.

“So many people have had this injury and they don’t get it taken care of and bones are coming out of their socket very easily,” Carter said. “I just wanted to eliminate all that. If I was to get in a cast and come back and the tendon didn’t come back out, then I’d have to wait another eight weeks and get the surgery. So I just went ahead and knocked it out to get it out of the way.

"It's all good. I'm just looking at the long-term now."

He was one of the league's youngest rookies but hardly played like it. He moved into the starting lineup for good just a few days into the preseason and wore multiple hats for the Bulls. Injuries to Kris Dunn, Bobby Portis and Denzel Valentine thrust Carter into a significant scoring role for the Bulls, sometimes acting as the No. 2 option behind Zach LaVine early in the season.

He took on more of a traditional post-up role - with solid footwork making him a serviceable roll man - when those players returned and Jim Boylen took over, slowing down the offense. He shot a respectable 48.5% from the field and his 79.5% mark from the foul line showed a nice touch. But he also went 6 of 32 from beyond the arc in his rookie season. He'll need to find some more versatility on the offensive end, though there will be more floor spacing in his sophomore season after the Bulls added Otto Porter Jr. at the trade deadline.

He is one of five rookies over the last seven seasons to average at least 7 rebounds and 1.3 blocks per game, joining Andre Drummond, Anthony Davis, Nerlens Noel, Kristaps Porzingis, Karl-Anthony Towns and Joel Embiid in that category. That's not to suggest that Carter will have the same career arc as those All-Stars plus Noel - he's got plenty to do on the defensive end - but in Carter the Bulls have found a defensive anchor and someone to complement Lauri Markkanen on that end of the floor.

He's a raw talent who showed promise as a rookie. And while it didn't result in an All-Rookie bid, the future is bright in the middle for the Bulls. Like many of his teammates, expectations will increase for Carter as they enter Year 3 of their rebuild.

Check out the All-Rookie Teams below.

Jake Arrieta full of appreciation in return to Wrigley mound: ‘I’ll never forget this city’

Jake Arrieta full of appreciation in return to Wrigley mound: ‘I’ll never forget this city’

The last time Jake Arrieta pitched at Wrigley Field, his night ended with Cubs fans giving him a rousing standing ovation. The former Cubs right hander tossed 6 2/3 innings of one-run ball, leading the Cubs to victory in Game 4 of the 2017 NLCS—their only win against the Los Angeles Dodgers that series.

Arrieta returned to Wrigley Field as a visitor on Monday night, making his first start against the Cubs since joining the Philadelphia Phillies last season. Ironically, Arrieta’s counterpart for the night was Yu Darvish, who ultimately replaced Arrieta in the Cubs starting rotation.

Despite now donning Phillies red, Cubs fans once again showed their love for Arrieta, giving him a lengthy standing ovation ahead of his first plate appearance. Darvish even stepped off the mound in respect for the moment.

“I loved it, absolutely loved it,” Cubs manager Joe Maddon said to reporters postgame. “[I’m] very happy that our fans would acknowledge him like that. Yu stepped away from the mound nicely. Jake deserved it.”

Arrieta tipped his helmet in appreciation for the crowd, taking in the moment for more than 30 seconds before stepping into the batter’s box. After the game, he told reporters that moment brought back memories of his time with the Cubs.

“That was something that really brought back great memories of getting that same sort of ovation pretty much on a nightly basis,” Arrieta said. “[I’m] very appreciative of that. I can’t say thank you enough to the city of Chicago, I really can’t.”

Arrieta took fans back to his Cubs tenure on Monday, throwing six innings of one run ball in the Phillies’ 5-4 10-inning win. Although the 33-year-old didn’t pick up the victory, he matched Darvish—who threw six innings of three-run ball—pitch by-pitch.

Phillies manager Gabe Kapler noted how well Arrieta handled his emotions throughout the night.

“I thought he handled the emotions really well. I thought he was in control of the game even when we were down,” Kapler said to reporters. “He always maintained his poise and he just got stronger as the outing went on and that’s why we were able to have him take down the sixth inning for us.”

It’s well-documented how Arrieta’s career improved for the better after the Cubs acquired him in a trade with the Baltimore Orioles in July 2013. When the Cubs acquired him, Arrieta held a career 5.46 ERA in 69 games (63 starts). He finished his Cubs career with a 2.73 ERA in 128 regular season starts. He also won five postseason games with the Cubs, including Games 2 and 6 of the 2016 World Series.

Despite moving on in free agency, Arrieta spoke highly of his time with the Cubs, their fans and the city of Chicago.

“Cubs fans all across the country, all across the world, they really respect and appreciate what guys are able to do here for them,” he said. “It means a lot, it really does.

"I’ll never forget this city, the fan base, the organization, everything that they did for me. It was 4 1/2 incredible years of my career.”

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