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Rose's injury changes Bulls' season, franchise's future

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Rose's injury changes Bulls' season, franchise's future

It was almost as if they already knew. Not just the severity of Derrick Rose's left-knee injury -- now confirmed as a torn ACL -- but in the Bulls' locker room, the somber feeling conveyed how grim the future would be.

What Kyle Korver called "saddest win" was indeed just that, a fitting, disastrous conclusion to the league's reigning MVP's injury-plagued campaign. Just when things began to look bright -- Rose was in the midst of a near triple-double performance in the opening game of the NBA playoffs, scoring 23 points, dishing out nine assists and snatching nine rebounds in a Game 1 rout over the 76ers -- the future of one of the game's brightest stars, as well as an entire franchise, changed when, with 1:20 left in the blowout win, Rose drove, left his feet and while in mid-air, before dropping off a pass to Carlos Boozer, crumpled to the ground after hearing something "pop" in the back of his knee, a source familiar with the situation told CSNChicago.com the All-Star point guard said afterwards.

In the short term, things won't be so bad, as the Bulls, as Tom Thibodeau is fond of saying, "have more than enough" to knock off the Sixers, who were simply unable to deal with the Bulls' size and multiple weapons, namely the dual threat of wings Luol Deng and Rip Hamilton. As brilliant as Rose was in Game 1, his outing was more of icing on the cake, as backup point guard C.J. Watson is a more than capable scorer and distributor, and the Bulls' stout defense won't be affected by their superstar's absence against the undersized, scoring-challenged Sixers.

But moving forward, assuming an experienced Boston squad gets by Atlanta, the tremendous depth of the Bulls might not be enough to survive the veteran Celtics, as Rose would be needed to at least cancel out point-guard counterpart Rajon Rondo, if not outplay him. During Rose's previous absences in the regular season -- including the season-ending knee injury, he suffered six separate setbacks over the course of the campaign -- Joakim Noah often said, "We need Derrick to get to where we want to get to," and he couldn't have been more correct.

Now, with Rose likely out for six months, if not more time, the Bulls' championship aspirations have to be put on hold. Don't forget, fellow All-Star Luol Deng postponed surgery on his left wrist in pursuit of a title this season and with his obligations to the British national team -- Great Britain is the host country for the upcoming Summer Olympics in his adopted hometown of London -- the Bulls will probably be without their two most significant players to start next season.

Rose probably needed to rest after this season, whether or not the Bulls made a title run, but while the Olympics aren't a big deal in the grand scheme of things, one has to wonder what kind of player he'll be after he returns. An ACL injury is no longer the death sentence it was for players' careers in the past, but at 23, Rose admittedly hasn't developed enough parts of his game that don't rely on his remarkable speed, explosiveness and athleticism to be a dominant force.

It's a fact that the Chicago native has a legendary work ethic and will put in long hours to recover his burst, as well as hone other parts of his game that will serve him well as an NBA veteran, something which would have happened even prior to the injury. However, when examining other marquee talents who have returned from major knee issues -- from big man Amar'e Stoudemire to former scoring champ Tracy McGrady and even Gilbert Arenas, all top-tier athletes -- it's clear that he has a long road ahead of him and there's no guarantee that he'll ever be the same player.

That said, as much as Thibodeau will be questioned for leaving Rose in a game that late with a double-digit lead -- something that he frequently does and came back to bite him, albeit in a less severe fashion, in last season's first-round series against the Pacers when Rose twisted his ankle -- the All-Star point guard could have hurt himself at any point in the game, as has been witnessed throughout the season. After missing 27 regular-season games and finding his groove against the Sixers, it's laughable that Rose would have asked out of the contest, though Bulls management might disagree.

If Thibodeau's lack of a contract extension was thought to be an issue before the injury, it will certainly be magnified now, as the front office has more ammunition to not extend him, give him a deal worthy of his coaching prowess or even opt to part ways. While there are playoff games left to be played, Rose's future has to be weighing heavily on the minds of an organization that made a significant investment in the homegrown product over the next five years, building a team around his unique abilities that has three other players -- Deng, Noah and Boozer -- also making eight-figure salaries per year for multiple seasons.

All of a sudden, the Bulls' championship window, believed to be open for years to come -- but certainly if not this season, the next -- looks a lot less open, unless Rose fully recovers from his injury much faster and better than most cases, something that can't be put past him, but won't be encouraged, as both the Bulls and his camp will preach patience. The problem is, in this trying season, in which Rose routinely has said, "God does everything for a reason," he's already shown the patience of Job.

From last season's Eastern Conference Finals loss to Miami through the waning moments of Saturday's game, even through all of Rose's litany of injuries, the prevailing thought was the worst-case scenario for the Bulls this season would be again falling short of the NBA Finals, due to not being able to get by the rival Heat for the second consecutive year.

Now, ending the season in that manner -- instead of, for all intents and purposes, it ending with 1:20 remaining in Game 1 of the first round -- would seem like a blessing.

Christian Yelich to Yu Darvish on Twitter, 'Nobody needs help facing you'

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USA TODAY

Christian Yelich to Yu Darvish on Twitter, 'Nobody needs help facing you'

In the wake of the cheating allegations surrounding the Houston Astros, multiple parties have weighed in with their takes on the situation, and this includes Cubs starter Yu Darvish. He stated that this past season, he had noticed "weird behavior" from batters. Bleacher Nation then tweeted out a video showing Darvish stepping off the mound in a matchup against Christian Yelich and the Milwaukee Brewers, stating that he stepped off the mound because Yelich's "eyes move first...I'm not sure what he is trying to do."

Darvish then went on to elaborate that he wasn't trying to accuse the Brewers of stealing signs, rather that he was just stating what he had noticed in terms of batter behavior. Darvish made a minor grammar mistake, saying "your" instead of "you're" and when he responded to try to clarify that, it may have accidentally caused more confusion, as some mistakenly thought he was saying that Yelich indeed was stealing signs, but this was not the case.

That didn't stop Yelich from sounding off on Darvish with quite a harsh response, a response that was so harsh that some were shocked at the nature of it.

MLB free agent Josh Donaldson chimed in, humorously stating that he could definitely  use some help hitting off of Darvish and jokingly asked for what tips Yelich might have. 

Darvish then retweeted a few tweets that illustrated the point he was trying to make. 

Darvish also responded to Donaldson, saying that he doesn't think the third baseman needs any help hitting off of him either. 

At the end of the Darvish seems to be in a good place, and from his Twitter interactions, it is clear that he was not as upset or offended over the situation as Yelich was. 

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Why Khalil Mack was in 'disbelief' watching Myles Garrett-Mason Rudolph incident

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USA Today

Why Khalil Mack was in 'disbelief' watching Myles Garrett-Mason Rudolph incident

Khalil Mack plays with emotion, but doesn’t let that emotion impact how he plays.

It’s how he compartmentalized his feelings prior to and during the Bears’ Week 5 game against the Oakland Raiders, the team that traded him to Chicago just before the start of the 2018 season. It’s how he hasn’t shown any frustration with getting double- and triple-teamed over the last few weeks, in which he only has one sack since Akiem Hicks went on injured reserve. 

And it’s why he was able to provide an interesting perspective on the shocking incident involving Cleveland Browns edge rusher Myles Garrett on Thursday night, which led to Garrett being suspended indefinitely by the NFL. 

“It was kind of like a disbelief moment,” Mack said of his reaction to Garrett hitting Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Mason Rudolph with his own helmet. “But ultimately it’s definitely something you don’t want to see transpire. 

“Football is an emotional game, right, but you have to know how to control those emotions. It was real crazy.”

It’s hard not to have an opinion on the Browns-Steelers melee. One Bears offensive lineman defended Steelers center Maurkice Pouncey, who received a three-game ban for kicking and punching Garrett after Rudolph was hit with his helmet (the gist of the defense: You have to be there to defend your quarterback). Other players took to social media to point out Rudolph’s role in instigating the brawl. 

While Garrett may not have started the fight, though, he escalated it to the point where it’ll be attached to his name for the rest of his career. 

“I learned a long time ago, it’s not what happens to you, it’s how you handle it,” Mack said. “And so, yeah. It’s one of those learning moments.” 

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