White Sox

Running with the Bulls: Draft buzz and goings-on

Running with the Bulls: Draft buzz and goings-on

Thursday, June 24, 20102:49 PM

By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

July 1 is marked on the calendars of NBA fans as the day everything unfolds around the league, but with tonight's NBA Draft, the real intrigue begins in advance. In fact, a week away from the official beginning to free agency, moves that could potentially alter the landscape of next season and beyond have already threatened to occur.

All of the hoopla surrounding the future of LeBron James and other top free agents perhaps have obscured observers to the ever-real possibility that other superstars in the league could also have new destinations -- via trade. A reminder of this reality was recently in effect when news broke that New Orleans Hornets were reportedly open to overtures for All-Star point guard Chris Paul, most notably from the Portland Trailblazers. The Hornets, whose sale from George Shinn to potential new owner Gary Chouest is still incomplete, would be making the move for financial considerations, but yet another wrinkle in the situation is that the team that potentially gets Paul would potentially receive better odds in the sweepstakes for his good friend James. New Orleans has attempted to shoot down the swirling rumors and a more likely scenario would involve the team trading Paul's speedy backup, Darren Collison -- who enjoyed an NBA all-rookie team campaign in Paul's extended absence -- along with one of their larger contracts, such as veteran center Emeka Okafor.

Although no other trade rumors thus far involve a star of Paul's magnitude, there are some other impact players reportedly on the block. Reports that the Minnesota Timberwolves are shopping talented power forward Al Jefferson (the organization has finally come to the conclusion that the pairing of similarly ground-bound power forward Kevin Love with Jefferson won't work) have persisted since the regular season and there have been recent indications that the Detroit Pistons (for veteran small forward Tayshaun Prince) and Memphis Grizzlies (for power forward Zach Randolph, fresh off what was a redemption year before off-court issues after the season) are two interested parties, with draft picks also being part of the proposed packages.

Another non-secret around the league is the mutual desire between the Toronto Raptors and Hedo Turkoglu to part ways. Sources tell CSNChicago.com that a three-way deal between the Raptors, Houston Rockets and Orlando Magic could happen sooner than later. While details still have to be worked out, Toronto would potentially receive center backup Marcin Gortat and defensive-minded swingman Mickael Pietrus, Orlando would get rugged power forward Luis Scola, a restricted free agent, and Turkoglu would head to Houston.

While those scenarios haven't occurred to this point, a handful of NBA swaps have already taken place. It began last week, when the Philadelphia 76ers dealt shot-blocking center Samuel Dalembert to the Sacramento Kings for grizzled small forward (and former Bull) Andres Nocioni and young finesse big man Spencer Hawes. The trade added a defensive presence for the Kings and with the departure of Dalembert, who was long-rumored to be on the trading block, the Sixers have an opportunity to start fresh under the new regime of head coach Doug Collins and the expected draft choice of Ohio State star and Chicago native Evan Turner with the second overall pick.

One of the busiest teams has been the Milwaukee Bucks. With former Bulls swingman John Salmons expected to opt out of the final year of his contract and hit the free-agent market after a strong second half to the season following his trade from Chicago, Milwaukee was proactive in acquiring a pair of small forwards. The Bucks picked up scorer Corey Maggette from the Golden State Warriors in exchange for veterans Dan Gadzuric and Charlie Bell, then traded a 2012 second-round pick to the New Jersey Nets for young talent Chris Douglas-Roberts.

A move involving both the draft and free agency took place when the Miami Heat sent backup shooting guard Daequan Cook and the 18th pick to the Oklahoma City Thunder for a second-round pick (32nd overall) in the draft. The deal gives Oklahoma City three first-round selections in the draft, as well as a reserve sharpshooter, but Miami may reap more benefits from the exchange. Shedding Cook's 2.2 million contract and the draft pick increases the Heat's salary-cap space and makes them even more of a force come July 1.

Another deal with a financial impact was Portland's 2 million purchase of a second-round pick from Golden State as compensation for their exchange of draft choices. The two teams swapped picks -- Portland receives the 34th overall pick from the Warriors, while Golden State acquired the 44th selection from the Warriors -- but more significant is the high value placed on moving up a mere 10 spots in the draft.

As far as the draft itself, one storyline to watch is how the stock of some of the crop of highly touted big men is dropping. Georgia Tech power forward Derrick Favors, once considered an option for Philadelphia with the second pick, now may not be a lock for New Jersey's third pick, as Syracuse swingman Wesley Johnson is now reportedly being given heavy consideration by the Nets, which makes sense in light of the Douglas-Roberts trade.

After a bad workout for the Warriors, Georgetown's Greg Monroe is now reportedly behind Baylor's Ekpe Udoh on Golden State's board. However, the Warriors, who have the sixth pick in the draft, went out of their way to deny he performed poorly and are reportedly higher on Kentucky center DeMarcus Cousins than either of the aforementioned pair.

Speaking of Cousins, the big man is now reportedly a lock for Sacramento, but his college teammate, center Daniel Orton could be in the midst of a massive freefall, due to underwhelming statistics in his lone college season and reports of being out of shape, concerns with his knees and speculated conflict within his camp. Marshall's Hassan Whiteside -- once considered a lock for the lottery -- is in a similar boat, as the prolific shot-blocker's reputation as immature has hurt him, along with reported poor workouts.

Three prospects seem to be headed in the opposite direction are talented swingman Paul George of Fresno State, rugged forward Damion James of Texas and Final Four hero Gordon Hayward of Butler. Some observers predict that the ever-rising trio is now destined for lottery picks, with Hayward having a chance to crack the draft's top 10.

With all of the action occurring around the league, Bulls fans shouldn't think Chicago is being left out. However, despite reports that the organization initiated talks with the Los Angeles Clippers to send the team's 17th pick and small forward Luol Deng to L.A. for the Clippers' No. 8 pick, a team source tells CSNChicago.com that the move has "zero chance" of taking form.

Still, with persistent trade rumors, teams shopping picks and draft-day deals that could impact free agency, don't be shocked if Chicago makes a move tonight, especially with players such as Deng, veteran guard Kirk Hinrich and surprising forward Taj Gibson being heavily coveted by certain teams. But as a prelude to the draft, enjoy CSNChicago.com's first-round mock draft (pending trades) below and don't forget to visit CSNChicago.com tonight for a live draft chat with yours truly.

1. Washington Wizards: John Wall, 6-foot-4 point guard, Kentucky
2. Philadelphia 76ers: Evan Turner, 6-foot-7 shooting guard, Ohio State
3. New Jersey Nets: Wesley Johnson, 6-foot-7 small forward, Syracuse
4. Minnesota Timberwolves: Derrick Favors, 6-foot-9 power forward, Georgia Tech
5. Sacramento Kings: DeMarcus Cousins, 6-foot-11 center, Kentucky
6. Golden State Warriors: Ekpe Udoh, 6-foot-11 power forward, Baylor
7. Detroit Pistons: Greg Monroe, 6-foot-11 center, Georgetown
8. Los Angeles Clippers: Al-Farouq Aminu, 6-foot-9 small forward, Wake Forest
9. Utah Jazz: Luke Babbitt, 6-foot-8 small forward, Nevada
10. Indiana Pacers: Ed Davis, 6-foot-9 power forward, North Carolina
11. New Orleans Hornets: Gordon Hayward, 6-foot-8 small forward, Butler
12. Memphis Grizzlies: Paul George, 6-foot-8 small forward, Fresno State
13. Toronto Raptors: Patrick Patterson, 6-foot-8 power forward, Kentucky
14. Houston Rockets: Cole Aldrich, 6-foot-11 center, Kansas
15. Milwaukee Bucks: Larry Sanders, 6-foot-10 power forward, Virginia Commonwealth
16. Minnesota Timberwolves: Xavier Henry, 6-foot-6 shooting guard, Kansas
17. Chicago Bulls: James Anderson, 6-foot-6 shooting guard, Oklahoma State
18. Oklahoma City Thunder: Damion James, 6-foot-8 small forward, Texas
19. Boston Celtics: Avery Bradley, 6-foot-3 shooting guard, Texas
20. San Antonio Spurs: Eric Bledsoe, 6-foot-1 point guard, Kentucky
21. Oklahoma City Thunder: Solomon Alabi, 7-foot-1 center, Florida State
22. Portland Trailblazers: Kevin Seraphin, 6-foot-9 power forward, France
23. Minnesota Timberwolves: Hassan Whiteside, 7-foot center, Marshall
24. Atlanta Hawks: Daniel Orton, 6-foot-10 center, Kentucky
25. Memphis Grizzlies: Elliot Williams, 6-foot-5 shooting guard, Memphis
26. Oklahoma City Thunder: Dominique Jones, 6-foot-4 shooting guard, South Florida
27. New Jersey Nets: Quincy Pondexter, 6-foot-7 small forward, Washington
28. Memphis Grizzlies: Craig Brackins, 6-foot-9 power forward, Iowa State
29. Orlando Magic: Jordan Crawford, 6-foot-4 shooting guard, Xavier
30. Washington Wizards: Darrington Hobson, 6-foot-7 small forward, New Mexico

Aggrey Sam is CSNChicago.coms Bulls Insider. Follow him @CSNBullsInsider on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bulls information and his take on the team, the NBA and much more.

Jace Fry, who still hasn't allowed a hit, is penciling his name into the White Sox bullpen of the future

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USA TODAY

Jace Fry, who still hasn't allowed a hit, is penciling his name into the White Sox bullpen of the future

The White Sox best reliever through the first 42 games of this rebuilding season? Undoubtedly, it’s been Jace Fry.

With Rick Renteria’s bullpen hardly the most reliable relief corps the game has ever seen, Fry has been a revelation, starting his 2018 campaign with 7.1 scoreless innings over six appearances.

And now things are getting a bit more dramatic for the 24-year-old lefty, a guy who’s been through a pair of Tommy John surgeries. He pitched some high-leverage ball in Saturday night’s 5-3 win, sitting down all four hitters he faced in the eighth and ninth innings while protecting a two-run lead.

“I was ready the whole game, just waiting for my name to be called,” Fry said. “But it was awesome getting in there in the eighth inning, even getting the first guy in the ninth inning. After I got him I was kind of hoping he’d let me keep going.”

Renteria uses his bullpen in a non-traditional manner, one that perhaps he thinks is a way of the future or one that’s a result of his lack of dominant options out there. Whichever it is, he doesn’t really have a closer but rather a host of guys he uses in those high-leverage situations, whenever they might come during the late stages of a game. Joakim Soria, Nate Jones and Bruce Rondon have all been used to get big outs late in games, and Rondon threw a scoreless seventh Saturday, with Jones getting the game’s final two outs for the save.

But it could be argued that most difficult outs were recorded by Fry, who put away the visiting Texas Rangers’ fourth, fifth and sixth hitters before getting the seventh hitter to strike out to start off the ninth.

Renteria steered away from dubbing Fry one of his new high-leverage guys after the game, but why wouldn’t Fry be in that mix? All he’s done since joining the big league squad earlier this month is get outs. He’s got 10 strikeouts, hasn’t allowed a hit and has just two walks as the lone blemishes on an otherwise perfect season line.

“It just happens to be that it was the eighth inning and the ninth that he pitched,” Renteria said. “I think he’s looking very comfortable in those. It happens to be the eighth and ninth we needed him. He’s been very, very effective. He’s been commanding the strike zone very well, confidently approaching his hitters. He’s got pretty good stuff.

“He’s able to command the zone. Along with that nice breaking ball he’s got to lefties and righties, it’s pretty effective. But he’s continuing to show you he’s capable of coming in and getting some pretty good hitters.”

Fry has been a rarity this season in that he’s appeared to be a candidate for a long-term spot in the White Sox bullpen. Jones would perhaps be the only other guy coming close to qualifying for that, mostly because of his team-friendly contract that keeps him under control a few more years, but he’s had some rough moments, even with his ERA dropping to 3.50 on Saturday.

Fry, though, is young and is dealing at the moment. He even got a shoutout as a potential long-term piece from general manager Rick Hahn earlier this week.

“Take Jace Fry, someone we haven’t mentioned when we’ve had this conversation the last couple of weeks,” Hahn said Thursday, discussing the positives he’s seen during this developmental season. “He’s shown up here and shown that he’s made some progress in his last stint in the minors and now, at age 24, seems like he’s ready to take that next step, and pencil his name in as part of what we’re building here going forward.”

There’s a lot of season left, and no one’s expecting Fry to keep batters hitless and opposing teams scoreless from now through the end of September. But this is a nice development for the rebuilding White Sox at the moment, a guy who’s giving them at least one name to put into that bullpen of the future.

How long can he keep this thing going? As long as he keeps getting ahead of hitters.

“Having the success is awesome, but I realize it’s the plan, the plan of attack,” Fry said. “I’m going out and throwing Strike 1 and getting ahead. Actually doing it, seeing it and having the process work definitely creates more confidence. Once you go back to the blueprint of baseball, Strike 1 is everything.”

Carson Fulmer's demotion and the current state of the White Sox rotation provide several rebuilding reminders

Carson Fulmer's demotion and the current state of the White Sox rotation provide several rebuilding reminders

Carson Fulmer getting sent to Triple-A following Friday’s game might be, to this point, the biggest development this season on the South Side.

Fulmer doesn’t carry the same expectations as higher-rated prospects like Michael Kopech, Alec Hansen or Dane Dunning, but this is a top-10 draft pick who the White Sox still believe can play a significant role in their bright future. And he’s struggling. Badly. Once his ERA jumped up past 8.00 thanks to his third straight brief and run-filled outing, the White Sox made the decision to send him to Charlotte.

It leaves the White Sox rotation looking like this: James Shields, a struggling Lucas Giolito, Reynaldo Lopez, Hector Santiago and either Chris Volstad or the recently summoned Dylan Covey.

Four of those guys (Shields, Santiago, Volstad and Covey) don’t figure to play a role in the team’s long-term future, and Giolito is dealing with his own significant struggles, leading the American League in walks heading into his Saturday-night start. Lopez has been the rotation’s bright spot, but even he watched his ERA climb more than a full point after allowing six runs in two innings his last time out.

It’s not a great state for the rotation to be in if you, like the White Sox, have your sights set on the long-term future of this team, though it probably won’t look like that for too much longer. Still, it provides a few valuable reminders about not only this rebuilding effort but rebuilds in general.

This season is about development, and this is what development looks like

For better or worse, this is what development looks like. The White Sox own baseball’s worst record, and general manager Rick Hahn has been among the large number of White Sox fans to voice their disappointment over play that has been sloppy at times.

Fulmer’s struggles fall into the same category and serve as a reminder that growing pains like this are going to happen. We’ve seen it with Fulmer. We’ve seen it with Giolito. We’ve seen it with Lopez. Heck, we’ve seen it with Yoan Moncada and Tim Anderson, too.

But more than wins and losses, this is what this season is about. Hahn calls it “the hardest part of the rebuild” because it features guys getting lit up and games being lost. The hope is that Fulmer can figure things out in the minors and that Giolito won’t require a similar demotion to right his ship. And if everything turns out all right, then this will be an easily forgotten chapter in both of those players’ development.

In the moment, though, it’s another reminder that rebuilds take time and that the waiting game provides minimal fun.

Each player’s development has a different trajectory

Just because Fulmer is getting bumped down to Triple-A doesn’t mean he can’t still turn into a successful major league pitcher. Player development and rebuilds aren’t linear, as rebuilders like to say. And to expect every prospect to travel in a straight line from potential to big league stardom doesn't make much sense.

“We reiterate, ‘It’s not the end of your career,’” Renteria said Saturday. “This is simply a reboot, a reset. Ultimately, I think after the initial shock for any player, they settle down and they understand exactly what’s going on when you look at it logically and look in the mirror. I think it’s easy to logically look at it and say, ‘I need to work on x, y and z.’

“This is a good kid with a really positive attitude and a lot of confidence. I think he’ll look in the mirror and go, ‘You know what, I got things I can work on, I’ll settle in and get over this initial bump and get to work.’ Those are the guys that end up giving themselves a chance to return sooner rather than later and have success.”

Not all prospects pan out

The other side of that coin is the reminder that not every single one of the White Sox wealth of prospects will pan out. Hahn & Co. have prepared for that and built up an incredible amount of prospect depth, but when someone doesn't live up to expectations, it will be painful.

This isn’t to suggest that Fulmer, specifically, won’t pan out, but it’s to point out that not everyone will. That’s a crowded-looking rotation of the future with Kopech, Hansen, Dunning, Fulmer, Giolito, Lopez, Carlos Rodon and Dylan Cease all competing for those eventual five spots. Rather than the White Sox having to make tough decisions about who will be left out, certainly a possibility, the developments of those pitchers might make those decisions for them.

Renteria is confident that Fulmer will be back in the big leagues, and there’s little reason to think that this is the end of Fulmer’s opportunity. But not every top-10 pick reaches All-Star status.

The future is on the way

The current starting rotation might have fans asking why the heck it looks like it does. But a month or two from now it will look drastically different.

Rodon makes his first rehab start Saturday at Class A Kannapolis as he battles back from shoulder surgery last fall, and he shouldn’t be too far away from providing a serious jolt to the starting staff. Not to mention, he’s a guy who as good a chance as anyone as grabbing one of those front-end spots, and with him in the rotation, things will look a tad more futuristic.

Same goes for Kopech, whose promotion figures to be coming at some point this summer. Given the hype and the expectations there, his arrival will obviously be a really big deal.

But regardless of the results either Rodon and Kopech put up in their first tastes of major league action in 2018, they’ll make the rotation into something that way more closely resembles the rotation of the future. There’ll be plenty of development left for the Hansens and the Ceases and the Dunnings in the minors. But a rotation featuring Rodon, Kopech, Giolito and Lopez looks a lot different than one featuring Shields, Santiago, Covey and Volstad.

Patience. It’s not much fun. But it’s necessary to build a contender.