White Sox

Son's arrest prompts MLB star to leave team

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Son's arrest prompts MLB star to leave team

From Comcast SportsNet
ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) -- Torii Hunter was placed on the Los Angeles Angels' restricted list Monday after his teenage son was arrested in Texas. The town of Prosper, Texas, issued a news release announcing 17-year-old Darius McClinton-Hunter of neighboring McKinney, Texas, was arrested Monday in a sexual assault case. The release said Prosper police made five arrests after a monthlong investigation of sexual assault of a child, a second-degree felony. Prosper police spokesman Celso Martinez confirmed McClinton-Hunter is Torii Hunter's son. Hunter's family lives in Prosper, a suburb north of Dallas that's home to several prominent athletes including Deion Sanders and Hunter's teammate, reliever LaTroy Hawkins. Angels manager Mike Scioscia said Hunter has left the team, but refused to say how long Hunter will be away from the club. "It's a personal matter," Scioscia said. "We're going to go day-to-day, and we'll just see where it is. That's all I'm going to say." Darius Hunter is one of Torii Hunter's three sons who played on the Prosper High football team last season. All three sons, including Torii Jr. and Monshadrik "Money" Hunter, are considered Division I football prospects, with Torii Jr. considering Stanford and Darius Hunter interested in playing at Oregon, according to his father. Darius Hunter, a receiver last season, reportedly attracted interest and scholarship offers from Texas Tech, SMU and West Virginia, among others. Hunter flew back to California with the Angels on Sunday night from the Dallas-Fort Worth area, where they faced the Rangers last weekend. But Hunter left Angel Stadium several hours before Monday's game against the Oakland Athletics. "This is very tough for a father," Hunter tweeted after leaving Angel Stadium. "Thanks for ur prayers and support. Be Blessed everyone." Hunter sat out Sunday's game, but would have been in the Angels' lineup Monday night, Scioscia said. Mark Trumbo took Hunter's spot in right field for the second straight night. The 36-year-old Hunter is a four-time All-Star, a nine-time Gold Glove winner and the Angels' clubhouse leader and unofficial captain. He's batting .256 with five homers and 15 RBIs this season, but has been in a slump with just two hits in 31 at-bats over Los Angeles' previous nine games before Sunday, including an 0-for-20 skid. The Angels called up Ryan Langerhans to replace Hunter on the roster, but Trumbo and Peter Bourjos are likely to absorb most of Hunter's playing time. Trumbo has played several positions since Albert Pujols took his spot at first base, but the second-year pro still leads the Angels with six homers and 16 RBIs despite playing in just 26 of their 35 games. The speedy Bourjos usually has been left out of the Angels' lineup in recent days, making just three starts since April 29 after beginning the season as Los Angeles' starting center fielder. He was on the bench again Monday, with heralded prospect Mike Trout again playing in center.

The White Sox see the light at the end of the rebuilding tunnel

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USA TODAY

The White Sox see the light at the end of the rebuilding tunnel

LAS VEGAS — Things are undoubtedly changing for the White Sox.

These aren't last year's Winter Meetings, where general manager Rick Hahn preached patience and was just a month away from declaring 2018 the toughest part of the team's rebuilding process. These are a different kind of Winter Meetings, where the White Sox are reportedly in on Bryce Harper, in on Manny Machado and cranking up the aggressiveness on the heels of a 100-loss season.

Make no mistake, though, despite all these rumors tying them to baseball's best players, the rebuild is still in full swing. But it's because of the progress they've seen in that rebuilding process that the White Sox feel so confident in being aggressive this winter. Hahn is confident his sales pitch to the Harpers and Machados of the baseball world — of course, he won't mention their names, specifically, in his chats with reporters — is a winning one: Join this team and within a few years, all that minor league talent will grow up around you and this will be a perennial championship contender.

It's not a reaction to 2018's ugly win-loss record. This isn't desperation. This was all part of the plan, to lure top free agents to the South Side with the promise of future success. As Hahn said last month at the GM Meetings, no one should be surprised to hear the White Sox linked to these elite players. The reason? The team is seeing the light at the end of this rebuilding tunnel.

To Hahn, that means that the wave of prospects he envisions washing up at Guaranteed Rate Field is getting closer. Eloy Jimenez figures to be with the major league team a few weeks into the 2019 season. Dylan Cease could be on the same path Michael Kopech was in 2018 and possibly arrive even earlier in the calendar than Kopech did. The catching tandem of the future could be knocking on the door at Triple-A Charlotte, and the bulk of talent that made Class A Winston-Salem so intriguing in 2018 could have the same effect at Double-A Birmingham in 2019.

Progress. It might not be the first thought in White Sox fans' heads as their favorite team keeps getting linked to Harper and Machado. But without that progress in the minor league system, there might not be as much aggressiveness. In other words, it's a heck of a lot easier to sell a future that you're able to see coming.

"Talking about the light at the end of the tunnel means that we're starting to see some guys get to the Double-A level and above that are going to help us in the not so distant future," Hahn explained Monday night. "Obviously we've promoted guys from Double-A before, so once they're there, they're established.

"You're starting to see a team where not only next year will you have obviously (Yoan) Moncada, (Tim Anderson) and (Reynaldo Lopez) and a full year of (Carlos) Rodon — knock on wood — but you're going to see, in all probability, Eloy Jimenez at some point and Dylan Cease. And then you're going to have at Triple-A (Zack) Collins and (Seby) Zavala. And you're going to have at Double-A a prospect-laden Birmingham team, any of number of whom could factor in, conceivably, at some point in the 2019 season. Might not. We're not going to rush this thing. We're going to let them, give them all the time they need where they're to the point where they're ready to succeed in Chicago. But they're in shouting distance.

"It's starting to get a little bit closer. We're not going to move it artificially. That's the way we can mess this thing up, to start rushing some guys or start making some shortsighted commitments that compromise our flexibility in the future, but it's getting closer."

Perhaps it's easy to play devil's advocate and point out the host of injuries to White Sox minor leaguers in 2018 and the effect all that health uncertainty could have on the timeline of this whole enterprise. Kopech will miss the entire 2019 season while recovering from Tommy John surgery. Dane Dunning has his own elbow injury to deal with. Luis Robert is healthy now but was robbed of much of a year of development time with thumb injuries. Jake Burger didn't play a lick in 2018 because of a pair of Achilles tears. Alec Hansen was the organization's No. 2 pitching prospect at this time last year before a lost season in 2018 due to a forearm injury and a demotion to Class A not long after his return to the mound.

But those always-entertaining 2020 lineup projections are still full of guys now making their way into the upper levels of the system. They're maybe months, a year or just a tad more away from cracking the big leagues.

And so the light at the end of the rebuilding tunnel is not Harper or Machado, though adding a 26-year-old superstar who fits in with the long-term plan certainly gets the White Sox closer to that point. The light is those rebuilding plans finally starting to come to fruition, the ascent of all that talent acquired when Hahn's front office traded Chris Sale and Adam Eaton and Jose Quintana. And because of that, there's a future worth selling to the best players in the game.

It also means there's a future with or without Harper and Machado, a fact that shouldn't be lost on anyone should the White Sox not win either free-agent sweepstakes.

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Brendan Perlini still trying to find role with Blackhawks

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AP

Brendan Perlini still trying to find role with Blackhawks

Brendan Perlini's start with the Blackhawks hasn't been ideal. He has zero points and is a minus-6 rating through six games since being acquired — along with Dylan Strome — from the Arizona Coyotes for Nick Schmaltz on Nov. 25. 

In his most recent game, Perlini logged only five shifts and was benched for the final 28:28 in a 4-3 loss to the Vegas Golden Knights on Thursday. Two days later he found himself a healthy scratch. It's been a little more than two weeks now, but Perlini is still trying to find his role in Chicago.

"You always want to be playing, but I always take the positive in everything and try to improve no matter what the situation is," Perlini said. "It's always tough, you come into a new situation, new things going on, you don't know too many people. ... There's a lot of things going on. I just have to stay focused on what I can do to help the team improve each day."

Is he feeling some pressure to live up to the trade and trying to do too much early on?

‘‘Nah, not really,’’ Perlini said. ‘‘I’m an easygoing guy. I just like to come and play hockey, and that’s it. I don’t think crazy things and blah, blah, blah. I just like to have fun, do my thing, work hard, improve. Hopefully the rest falls into place.’’

The Blackhawks aren't asking too much out of him. He's not going to produce big numbers offensively because that's not the kind of player he is. At 6-foot-3, 211 pounds, Perlini is more of a power forward and the Blackhawks want him to be harder to play against so that he can turn into a consistent top-9 forward.

"We just want him to have a little more urgency without the puck," coach Jeremy Colliton said. "Skate, work, work away from the puck, and I think he'll put himself in good situations."

Perhaps it's a little more difficult to establish your role when the team is on a seven-game losing streak because there's lots of mixing and matching going on as they search for the right formula to break out of it. Perlini (and Strome) has yet to be a part of a win with the Blackhawks, which probably isn't helping as they get acclimated to their new locker room.

But it's also an opportunity to take control and make an impact when things aren't going your way, both individually and as a team, and learn from some of the veterans who have three Stanley Cups on their resume.

"I'm just trying to improve with different things every day and learn off the guys," Perlini said. "Obviously, some unbelievable players. The team is going through a skid, but you take a look around the room — [Jonathan] Toews, [Patrick] Kane, all the guys who have won things and done tremendous things in the game — those are the guys you want to be around and learn from and improve from. For me, regardless of what the situation is, I’m always going to try to improve and better myself.’’