White Sox

Spring Break is good for all

Spring Break is good for all

By Frankie O
CSNChicago.com

Hello again everybody! Sorry I havent been here for a while, it was time for me to once again play Clark Griswald and take the family on a spring break adventure. Hard to believe, but break time just kind of snuck up on me this year. This whole winter without Arctic Circle weather has my timing all off. March Madness came out of nowhere, and was gone before I could work up much enthusiasm. I rooted against Kentucky the entire time, and that was fun, but to no avail. The salt in the wound was the fact that I had Kansas and Kentucky in the final game and if K.U. had won, I would have celebrated along with them. Teased once again! Just like when I didnt win the 656 million Mega Millions jackpot. Like most of the people I talked to at the bar, I was buying tickets all over the Chicagoland area. Just 2 dollars here and there, but I guess they add up. Judging by the lines I stood in, I wasnt alone. (I have several different people-watching environments that amuse me to no end, as we all do, but I might have found a new favorite. Watching the interactions of all types of people waiting in line, then getting their chance to buy the golden ticket was priceless.)

That Friday at the bar was one of the few times in memory that the conversation wasnt dominated by sports talk. It was a day of speculation of what one would do with that much cash, and oddly enough, sports never entered the discussion. I found this ironic since there is hardly a time now when we talk sports and money isnt mentioned.

As with any trip, planning is a must. You cannot go on the road without the essentials, and for me that meant a new phone. This because I found out in the week before we left that my iPhone 3 was yesterdays news for keeping up with my roto baseball addiction. What?! Im not going to bore you -- at least at this time! -- with the early trials and tribulations, of which there are many, that have befallen my two teams, but being able to deal with them anytime, anywhere is a non-negotiable! I might have taken a while to get on-board the technology revolution, but Im in knee-deep now. (Or, is that in over my head?) I want information, any information, to be on my person 247 so I can access it whenever the mood strikes, or, more importantly, when I can sneak away for five minutes. Say hello to a proud new iPhone 4S owner. I cant wait until I can figure this thing out! At least I have a new woman in my life, Siri. And like the rest of them, she cant give me a straight answer. This forces my kids to ask who Im yelling at, their mother or my new cell-phone-wife. (Im just kidding, I would never yell at Siri!)

Of course, the funny thing is, that after I went to the trouble, and expense, to acquire my new traveling companion, the news it (she) gave me about my baseball teams was nothing I wanted to know. I find myself being like some managers, maybe one that you know, in that I just keep saying its early, way too much time left to panic. And like those said real managers, while I want to believe the words coming out of my mouth, I realize that Im just whistling in the dark.

As I was getting the car ready for the trip, late at night after getting home from work, I couldnt help but notice the large, illuminated orb in the sky. Typical, nothing like starting a vacation under the watchful eye of a full moon, right? And the fact that I would return to work on Friday the 13th thats not a cause for concern either, is it? Where I sit, I would expect nothing less. I laughed as I reminded myself of this as we sat in over-night construction for two hours outside Sandusky, Ohio. Wheres Tommy Boy when you need him?

While something like setting up my e-mail accounts made me want to pull my hair out, I soon was able to find one of the immediate benefits of my 4G -- HD phone: Masters.com. Im one of those who think that there cannot be enough Masters on TV. It takes forever for the network coverage to start. Well, at Masters.com there are as many as seven live streams and they start when the golfers do. How cool is that? And say youre watching the kids and theyre insistent on what they want to watch on the only TV, having a hand-held option comes in, dare I say, handy. Go ahead kids. Watch whatever you want because Daddy loves you! (And his phone!) And the great thing is that you can take your Masters coverage anywhere. Thats right, you heard me, anywhere!

The hype leading up to this years tournament was, I thought, very appropriate. There were a lot of great story lines and most of the top guys were playing very well at the same time. Unlike watching team sports, I usually have more than one rooting interest when watching golf. There are a bunch of guys that I root for and seeing any one of them doing well is cool. Cooler yet would be seeing a bunch of them in contention, together. Im always rooting for the Tiger vs. Phil, and while that was not going to be, at least Phil was in the final group on Sunday and hes as exciting as there is at Augusta. Couple that with the fact that no one except his family, and even them Im not so sure of, expected 54-hole leader Peter Hanson to remain on his perch, and this had the makings for another memorable Masters.

Having been to Augusta National, I agree that while spectacular on TV, that medium still doesnt give the golf course its due in regard to how overwhelming the surroundings are. But as a fan, I want to be watching the final round on TV because I want to be able to watch the whole story as it is being told. Being able to sit back and watch every shot of the leaders on Sunday is how I like to experience a Major. For this years Masters I was pretty much able to do that. From Louis Oosthuizens double-eagle on 2, all the way to Bubba Watsons 150 yard snap-hook from the woods to 10 feet on the second playoff hole, (10) I was on the edge of my seat, or enjoying Easter dinner, or both. It was as exciting a golf tournament that you could ever watch, let alone one that was played on the best course in the world. The best part was trying to explain what a double-eagle was to a room full of people more focused on dinner than I was, if you can imagine that.

The next day was spent downtown in Philadelphia, but not at the Phils opener as some might expect. I took the opportunity to take the kids into the city for the first time that any of them could remember. Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell were naturals to show the history. Tony Lukes was also a natural, to eat amazing, authentic cheesesteak and soak up some of the Phillies pre-game vibe. But next was about THE fictional hero of the city Im from, Rocky Balboa. First we cruised through the neighborhoods and outdoor Italian market that Rocky made so famous. After which there was only one place to go, the place he made most famous of all: The steps of the Philadelphia Art Museum. I had not been there in years but thought the kids would get a kick out of it. And even though they didnt have any idea who Rocky Balboa was, through the wonder of YouTube, they found out all they needed to know about the steps. Watching them run up and then mimic the triumphant Rock at the top was something I wont soon forget. What a blast. I guess theres a reason why places become ultimate destinations, their charm cannot be denied.

It was then time to head back home and to get ready for all the spring calendar has to offer in the world of sports. Baseball has started and even in spite of rampant pessimism of fans on both sides of town, there are going to be storylines to follow all summer long. But the main focus right now has to be on the playoffs: The ones in hockey that are already off to a riveting start and of course, the good versus evil narrative that will be the Bull vs. Heat. For a fan, this will be non-stop, every night for the next two months. This is better than the gifts under the tree at Christmas, although, like Christmas gifts, some might not be happy with what they receive. But the season is going to give until it, and every player that is left standing, hurts. These are the best four-round reality shows on this earth and in June there will be only one team left standing in each sport. I cant wait to see who they are and thanks to my hiatus, Im as ready as the players to get on with it. While Im pretty confident that the Bulls and Heat are going to meet again, and I cant wait, there is another rematch out there that I dont know if Im ready to handle again. It always happens when you least expect it, so Im watching out for a meeting in the NHL Finals of a 5 and 6 seed, the ultimate reality show for yours truly, Flyers-Hawks. Can you imagine? Thank goodness Im rested up, lets watch and get ready, its going to be an interesting ride.

If the Futures Game tells us anything, it's that the White Sox outfield of the future is ridiculously deep

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USA TODAY

If the Futures Game tells us anything, it's that the White Sox outfield of the future is ridiculously deep

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Just how deep is the White Sox outfield of the future?

The answer was embodied by the leadoff hitter in the Futures Game on Sunday afternoon in the nation’s capital.

Luis Alexander Basabe was one of two White Sox representatives in the prospect showcase held two days prior to baseball’s Midsummer Classic, along with pitcher Dylan Cease. And while Basabe was very deserving of the honor in the middle of a strong 2018 campaign — he blasted a two-run homer on a 102 mph pitch in the third inning — he’s not exactly the first name that comes to mind when running down the organization’s top prospects in the outfield.

MLB Pipeline ranks four outfielders — Eloy Jimenez, Luis Robert, Blake Rutherford and Micker Adolfo — ahead of Basabe on its list of White Sox prospects. And after Basabe come Ryan Cordell and Luis Gonzalez. And that’s before mentioning players outside the top 30 in the system, guys having big years like Joel Booker and Alex Call.

It makes for a lengthy list of possibilities to populate the outfield on the next contending White Sox squad.

“There’s a lot of players who have good ability, and that’s cool,” Basabe said Sunday. “I look at them, and I say, ‘They are good!’ And that makes me work more to be in the big leagues.”

That, of course, has been Rick Hahn’s goal all along during this rebuilding effort, to build as much depth throughout the farm system as possible.

That depth has been seemingly achieved among the organization’s starting-pitching corps, where Cease, Michael Kopech, Alec Hansen and Dane Dunning have joined current big leaguers Carlos Rodon, Lucas Giolito and Reynaldo Lopez as potential members of the rotation of the future.

The outfield, though, is equally loaded.

That depth is obvious with Basabe’s selection to the Futures Game. The White Sox are showing they deserve the title of one of baseball’s best farm systems when their No. 13 prospect is capable of reaching the game’s premier prospect event.

Of course, the other benefit of depth is tied to Basabe’s selection: It’s a heck of a safety net for the inevitable injuries that come with being a professional baseball player. Jimenez, Robert and Adolfo are all currently dealing with injuries of varying significance, with Adolfo out for the next eight to 10 months after having Tommy John surgery and Robert out for the second long stretch this season with a thumb injury.

No one is suggesting that these specific injuries will derail the careers of any of those three big talents. But being able to point to other young outfielders as backup plans is a key for any organization, especially one so focused on the future like the White Sox. Prospects succumbing to injuries or simply not reaching expectations is a reality of the game. But if such things should occur, the White Sox, at least, have quite the Plan Bs in the likes of Basabe, Rutherford, Gonzalez and more.

Take a look at the numbers the White Sox outfield prospects have put up this season.

— Jimenez: .313/.371/.541 with 12 homers and 46 RBIs in 65 with with Double-A Birmingham and Triple-A Charlotte

— Robert: .293/.372/.373 with five extra-base hits and nine RBNIs in 21 games with Class A Kannapolis and Class A Winston-Salem

— Adolfo: .283/.368/.466 with 11 homers and 50 RBIs in 78 games with Class A Winston-Salem

— Rutherford: .305/.348/.468 with 30 extra-base hits and 60 RBIs in 75 games for Class A Winston-Salem

— Basabe: .256/.356/.447 with 10 homers and 37 RBIs in 80 games with Class A Winston-Salem and Double-A Birmingham

— Gonzalez: .300/.352/.478 with nine homers, 26 doubles and 38 RBIsin 75 games with Class A Kannapolis and Class A Winston-Salem

— Booker: .285/.364/.440 with seven homers, 55 runs scored and 27 RBIs in 74 games with Class A Winston-Salem and Double-A Birmingham

— Call: .251/.359/.407 with seven homers and 36 RBIs in 77 games with Class A Winston-Salem and Double-A Birmingham

That’s all very, very good news for the White Sox.

Back in spring training, Jimenez, Robert and Adolfo talked about their desire to arrive on the South Side at about the same time and make up the team’s outfield one day. Well, there’s a good chance that the three outfielders on the next contending White Sox team will come from the above list of names.

“There’s a lot of competition,” Basabe said. “We’re here, this is what it’s about. We’ve got to compete.”

Former Blackhawks goalie Ray Emery dies in early morning drowning

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AP

Former Blackhawks goalie Ray Emery dies in early morning drowning

Former Blackhawks goaltender Ray Emery was identified as the victim in an early morning drowning on Sunday at the Hamilton Harbour, Hamilton Police confirmed. He was 35.

According to the Hamilton Spectator, Emery and his friends jumped in the water around 6:30 a.m., but Emery never resurfaced. His body was recovered later in the afternoon.

Emery played in the NHL for 10 seasons, two of which came with the Blackhawks from 2011-13, where he served as a backup goaltender to Corey Crawford.

In 2013, he teammated up with Crawford to win the William M. Jennings Trophy, awarded to the goaltender(s) with the fewest goals against in a single season, before going on to capture his first Stanley Cup. During that season, Emery went 17-1-0 with a 1.94 goals against average, .922 save percentage and three shutouts.

The hockey community took to Twitter to offer their condolences when news began to spread: