Bears

St. Francis is big surprise in Class 3A

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St. Francis is big surprise in Class 3A

In his first year as head coach at Wheaton St. Francis, Bob Ward thought he had the best of all worlds. After teaching history for 35 years and coaching at Round Lake, Spring Valley, Lake Zurich and Wheaton North, he was eager to accept a coaching-only assignment for the first time.

"I retired from teaching in June but I still wanted to coach in some capacity," Ward said. "I took this job in May. It has been a revelation. I always dreamed of just coaching, not lecturing in history class. But I wasn't sure what I was walking into."

Wheaton St. Francis has a reputation as a football school. Coach Greg Purnell produced a state champion in 2008. Mike Harper had a successful basketball program for 23 years, winning five regional titles and finishing fourth in Class A in 1989. But that was the school's only sectional winner.

"They always had a good program under Mike Harper," Ward said. "But in all the scouting I did, I never saw St. Francis. We didn't play them. I only knew of one kid, Ryan Coyle, a three-year player who started last year."

But Ward wasn't sure if Coyle would be able to play this season. The 6-foot-6 senior was hampered with a lower back problem last summer. In late July, after being cleared to play, he was undercut in an AAU game and suffered a broken collarbone and a concussion.

"He was out indefinitely," Ward said. "What we heard when it first happened was that he would miss the entire year of basketball. Then he gradually got better. He was struggling in the fall when school began. But then he came around."

On Friday night, in what Ward described as "my biggest win in coaching," Coyle scored 13 points, including a game-winning three-pointer with just over a minute to play as Wheaton St. Francis stunned top-seeded Orr 39-36 for the Class 3A regional championship at Wheaton Academy.

"We have tough kids but I had followed Orr during the year knowing that they would be in our sectional," Ward said. "I saw them on Tuesday and marveled how difficult they would be to guard. They were the best team we have played all year.

"But we told our kids that we have played De La Salle, Bogan and St. Viator, all highly rated Class 4A teams. In those games, we came back and weren't intimidated."

Coyle wasn't the only starter who was missing in action during the summer. Nick Donati, a 6-foot senior point guard who played quarterback on the football team, was sidelined with a bum shoulder.

"I didn't see them in the summer," Ward said. "To their credit, they never missed a day of camp or a summer game. I had a good idea of the character of these guys who would be our leaders.

"At camp in late May, I noticed these kids took coaching pretty well and they defended well in man-to-man defense. Honestly, I wasn't optimistic or pessimistic. I didn't know how good they would be. But we won the Batavia tournament against Class 4A teams to start the year. That boded well for us. They jelled as the season went along."

Ward was further encouraged by his team's 2-2 showing at the York Holiday Tournament. We played a lot of Class 4A teams and that has helped us."

So Wheaton St. Francis will carry a 19-7 record into Tuesday night's sectional against Crane at Glenbard South.

Ward will start Coyle (16 PPG, 8 RPG), Donati (8 PPG, 4 assists, 5 RPG), 6-foot-3 senior Brian Spahn (9 PPG), 6-foot-7 senior Zach Roswold (6 PPG, 4 RPG) and Andrew Kimball (6 PPG), who missed the last two games with illness but scored 18 and 19 points in two earlier games. Kimball is due to return for Tuesday's game.

Tim Zettinger, a 6-foot-2 junior, and Jason Pisarski, a 6-foot-3 junior, provide spark off the bench.

"To keep winning, we must prepare well and maintain our confidence, as we were for Orr," Ward said. "Our kids aren't overly loose or cocky. They are playing their best basketball of the season right now."

Matt Nagy calls Kevin White a 'great weapon' with a new future

Matt Nagy calls Kevin White a 'great weapon' with a new future

Former first-round pick Kevin White hasn't caught a break -- or a touchdown -- through the first three years of his career. He has more season-ending injuries than 100-yard games and after an offseason focused on upgrades at wide receiver, White's future in Chicago beyond 2018 is very much in doubt.

Ryan Pace declined the fifth-year option in White's rookie contract, making this a prove-it year for the pass-catcher who once resembled a blend of Larry Fitzgerald and Dez Bryant during his time at West Virginia.

He's getting a fresh start by new coach Matt Nagy.

"He is healthy and he's really doing well," Nagy told Danny Kanell and Steve Torre Friday on SiriusXM's Dog Days Sports. "We're trying to keep him at one position right now so he can focus in on that."

White can't take all the blame for his 21 catches, 193 yards and zero scores through 48 possible games. He's only suited up for five. Whether it's bad luck or bad bone density, White hasn't had a legitimate chance to prove, on the field, that he belongs.

Nagy's looking forward, not backward, when it comes to 2015's seventh pick overall.

"That's gone, that's in the past," Nagy said of White's first three years. "This kid has a new future with us."

White won't be handed a job, however.

"He's gotta work for it, he's gotta put in the time and effort to do it," Nagy said. "But he will do that, he's been doing it. He's a great weapon, he's worked really hard. He has great size, good speed. We just want him to play football and not worry about anything else."

Nagy on Trubisky: 'He wants to be the best'

Nagy on Trubisky: 'He wants to be the best'

The Bears concluded their second round of OTAs on Thursday with the third and final set of voluntary sessions scheduled for May 29-June 1. Coach Matt Nagy is bringing a new and complicated system to Chicago, so the time spent on the practice field with the offense and quarterback Mitch Trubisky has been invaluable.

"We’ve thrown a lot at Mitch in the last 2 ½ months,” Nagy told Dog Days Sports’ Danny Kanell and Steve Torre on Friday. “He’s digested it really well.”

Nagy’s implementing the same system he operated with the Chiefs, an offense that brought the best out of Redskins quarterback Alex Smith. The former first-overall pick went from potential draft bust to MVP candidate under Andy Reid and Nagy’s watch.

Nagy admitted he and his staff may have been a little too aggressive with the amount of information thrust upon Trubisky so far.  It took five years to master the offense in Kansas City, he said, but the first-year head coach sees a lot of similarities between his current and past quarterbacks.

"These guys are just wired differently,” Nagy said when comparing Trubisky to Smith. “With Mitch, the one thing that you notice each and every day is this kid is so hungry. He wants to be the best. And he’s going to do whatever he needs to do. He’s so focused.”

Smith had the best year of his career in 2017 and much of the credit belongs to Nagy, who served as Smith’s position coach in each season of his tenure in Kansas City. He threw for eight touchdowns and only two interceptions during the five regular season games that Nagy took over play-calling duties last year.

Nagy said Trubisky has a similar attention to detail that Smith brought to the Chiefs’ quarterback room.

"Each and every detail that we give him means something. It’s not just something he writes down in a book. He wants to know the why,” Nagy said of Trubisky. “He’s a good person that is in this for the right reason. His teammates absolutely love him. It was the same thing with Alex [Smith] in Kansas City.”

A locker room that believes in its quarterback is a critically important variable for success, one that Nagy already sees exists in Chicago.

"When you have that as a coach and when you have that as being a quarterback, not everybody has that, and when you have that you’re in a good spot.”