White Sox

The Starting Five: Bulls vs. Raptors

The Starting Five: Bulls vs. Raptors

Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2011
12:33 p.m.

By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

1. Talk about a quick turnaround. A day after trading James Johnson to the Raptors, the Bulls will be reunited with their former teammate. They have high expectations for the second-year forward in Toronto. JJ is a good player. Good young player, didnt have enough time to play because of who we have on our team, said Rose after Thursdays shootaround. I think that hes going to be a good player in this leagueJohnson brings a lot of energy, athleticism to the game. A guy that can run one, two and three, and four sometimes. Hes very versatile on the court. Chimed in Joakim Noah: JJs the man. I think hes somebody who works really hard, who has a lot of talent and I think Raptors fans are going to be really excited with JJ. Hes somebody whose talent hasnt really been seen yet. He really hasnt had too much playing time. I wish him nothing but the best. Hes a great teammate. Although Thibodeau seemed to keep Johnson on a short leash early in the season, then relegate him to strictly late-game, blowout situations, the coach had positive praise for the Wake Forest product. He was terrific for us. We didnt a whole lot of minutes for him. His attitude was great, he worked extremely hard, hes athletic. he can play the three, the four, he can play some two and I think its a good move for the Raptors. I also think its a good move for us because it gives us some flexibility going forward.

2. At 15-41, the lowly Raptors arent exactly a playoff contender, but Johnson should fit in nicely to a young, rebuilding and athletic squad, fitting in with the likes of emerging second-year swingman DeMar DeRozan and similarly athletic wing Sonny Weems. If Johnson is afforded the immediate playing time, he should provide Toronto with more size and versatility on the perimeter. While he hasnt seen much action as of late, Johnsons encouraging D-League stint and flashes of potentialin key situationsearly in the season (not to mention his rookie year, in which he started 11 games for Vinny Del Negro) show that he has something to offer. Unfortunately, that opportunity wasnt there for him in Chicago.

3. With the NBA trade deadline Thursday afternoon, theres been rampant speculation that the Bulls arent done making moves, particularly to address their supposed deficiency at shooting guard. Houstons Courtney Lee is a name thats been bandied around with frequency, although reports indicate the Rockets want sizespecifically Omer Asikin return. With the 2011 first-round pick acquired from Toronto in the Johnson trade, however, the Bulls could not only sweeten the pot in a potential deal for Lee (the organization reportedly previously offered one first-rounder and were rebuffed), but for another candidate whose name got a lot of traction earlier in the season: Memphis O.J. Mayo. Two veterans, sharpshooter Rasual Butler of the Clippers and Naperville, Ill., native Anthony Parker of the Cavaliers, could also be in the mix, while Detroits Richard Hamilton is a long shot, although theres a slim chance the disgruntled Rip could be bought out by the Pistons after the deadline and signed later in the season.

4. When evaluating the aforementioned players, obviously Lee and Mayo have youth on their side, as they are both third-year players. Lee was a rookie starter on an NBA Finals team in Orlando, but was traded to an almost historically-bad Nets squad the following offseason before landing in Houston in another offseason deal last summer. The Indianapolis native and former Western Kentucky star is considered low maintenance on and off the court, an efficient scorer, tough defender and solid outside shooter. Mayo might have the most talent of the bunch, but also comes with the highest risk factor, after a well-publicized incident surrounding a card game with teammate and Chicago native Tony Allen on the team plane. Hes a more than capable scorer, but like Lee, he now comes off the bench (a move reportedly made for a more balanced second unit, but tellingly hasnt seemed to affect the Grizzlies chemistry or record) and although he can shoot the ball, hes more of a volume scorer, needs the ball in his hands to be truly effective and hasnt proven to be the type of defender that would do well under Thibodeau. As for the veterans, Butler would probably be the best fit because of his long-range marksmanship, while Parkers toughness and versatility would seem to be a natural fit and although Hamilton is more of a mid-range shooter than a long-ball specialist, his ability to play off the ball and championship pedigree would give a somewhat inexperienced team (only Thomas has been to the Finals) some valuable leadership come playoff time.

5. Dont forget to follow me on Twitter at @CSNBullsInsider.

Aggrey Sam is CSNChicago.com's Bulls Insider. Follow him @CSNBullsInsider on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bulls information and his take on the team, the NBA and much more.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Interview with Hall of Famer Harold Baines

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NBC Sports Chicago

White Sox Talk Podcast: Interview with Hall of Famer Harold Baines

Chuck Garfien sits down with new Hall of Famer Harold Baines.

First, Chuck, Ryan McGuffey and Chris Kamka share their memories of watching Baines play with the White Sox (1:40). Then, Baines explains why he's always been so soft-spoken (8:45), how he was able to play 22 seasons in the majors (13:00), why he's never spoken to GM Larry Himes for trading him to Texas (15:30), the apology he received from President George W. Bush (16:30), what he thinks about the critics who don't think he should be in the Hall of Fame (18:25), a replay of Baines emotional interview with Chuck about his dad (20:50) and more.

Listen to the full episode in the embedded player below:

White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson discusses inspiring a younger generation of black baseball players, bat flipping and much more on Pull Up Podcast with CJ McCollum

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USA TODAY

White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson discusses inspiring a younger generation of black baseball players, bat flipping and much more on Pull Up Podcast with CJ McCollum

White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson appeared on Thursday's episode of the Pull Up Podcast hosted by Portland Trail Blazers guard CJ McCollum and ESPN's Jordan Schultz to discuss many things including his MLB career, the charity work he does in the Chicago community and the need more expression and entertainment (overall) in baseball.

McCollum asked Anderson if the sport of baseball has evolved and what he would do to further these developments, based on the idea that the sport has a stigma of being boring, particularly within inner-city and/or largely black communities. Anderson stated, "They should allow players to have more fun.....just allow players to be themselves." 

Anderson discussed how being the only black player on the White Sox—the team that represents the South Side of Chicago—is extremely important to him and how great the White Sox organization has been at giving him every opportunity to be himself and "be comfortable". He expanded on how much he loves MLB life and how he wants to be able to pass on that love for the game to younger generations, especially the youth of the South Side of Chicago.

"I enjoy it [the responsibility of being the lone black player on the White Sox].....a lot of those kids in they area [the South Side], they kinda remind me of myself."

Schultz brought up the criticism of Anderson's bat flipping, asking him why it was so important for him to show that he was enjoying himself, at the expense of breaking one of baseball's "unwritten rules".

Being of a younger generation, Anderson lamented that it was indeed a new day in baseball and doubled down in saying that the simple aspect of having fun needs to be encouraged even more in the sport. 

"You're playing a game that you're failing most of the time and the times that you do succeed they don't want you to enjoy those moments. For me man, y'know, I think that's just a lot of pain showing.....from struggling, that's just that emotion that's coming out man. You know when you finally get to a point where you feel like you breaking through.....those moments that I want to remember and I want people around me to remember. That’s why I play the way that I do.”

Anderson is indeed having the best season of his career so far, with a slash line of .317/.342/.491 entering Friday morning. He is also nine home runs away from matching his season-high of 20 with over the half the season left to go.

With even more of a platform amid his career-year, Anderson has continued his crusade to make baseball fun again and doesn’t plan on changing up the way he plays the game anytime soon.


 

As touched on earlier in this post, Anderson wants to serve as a role model while also showing the youth that it is OK to be yourself as a Major League Baseball player.

In all the camps and baseball clinics that Anderon hosts, he always makes sure to answer every question about his unique experience in the MLB because he understands the value of kids getting to see someone who looks like them succeeding, even more so in a sport where the number black players sits at a mere 7.7% of the entire league

“Everything [is] not always good [for kids in inner-city communities], so I think that understanding that and kinda being a role model and motivating and inspiring those kids that look like me and I look like them, I think it's easier for those kids to look up to me. So that's why I go out and play hard and....enjoy the moment and do those crazy things on the field.....because that's what those kids like."

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