Big Ten basketball

NBA Draft Big Board Check In 2.0: Romeo Langford nets near double double in IU loss

NBA Draft Big Board Check In 2.0: Romeo Langford nets near double double in IU loss

Mark Schanowski's Big Board 6.0 had some movement, particularly around the bottom half of the top 10. We take the time to go over some performances from throughout the week, including a prospect who dropped out of Schanowski's top 10 earlier in the season.

Rui Hachimura, Gonzaga (vs San Diego): 22 PTS (10/15 FG), 10 REB, 1 STL

Hachimura’s efficient double double came on Saturday against San Diego but we wanted to make sure we discussed he continued excellent play. Against the Toreros, Hachimura was an imposing force in the paint and finished the night shooting 66.6 percent from the field. But just as important, he was 1/3 on his shots outside the paint, which included a (missed) 3-point attempt. The fact that he has improved year-to-year as a jump shooter bodes very well for his NBA future.

At this stage of his development, Hachimura figures to be a nice pick-and-roll scorer based off of his quickness alone. If Hachimura’s defender is trying to hedge and then get back to him, it’s a near impossible task if the weakside defense is not helping early.


At 6-foot-8, Hachimura is a bit undersized for what seems like it would be his natural position at center. And if he plays power forward in the NBA, he will certainly need to improve his touch from outside and his ball-handling. Overall, Hachimura is an intriguing prospect but the lack of depth in this class makes it tough to peg exactly where he should go. But with a solid post game, tremendous finishing inside the paint, great rebounding and an explosive faceup game, he is more than worth a look inside the top-15 to 20 picks.

Romeo Langford, Indiana (vs Purdue): 14 PTS, 9 REB, 2 AST, 1 BLK, 1 STL, 9/10 FT line

Langford continued to flash all the things that make him both impressive and frustrating as a prospect on Tuesday night. His 14 points against rival Purdue came on only six shots, which was awesome to showcase just how efficient he can be as a scorer without needing to use up a ton of possessions.

His 10 free throw attempts were the sixth time this season that he has reached double-digit attempts from the charity stripe. Langford is as physical as they come as a wing prospect. He knows that opponents are playing him for the drive, but he still barrels into the chest of his defender, forcing the referees to make a call one way or the other. When you watch Langford play, it is easy to picture him getting to the free throw line a considerable amount at the NBA level. And on top of his clear ability to get to the free throw line, Langford has shown a tremendous step-back jump shot that could one day become a staple in his offensive game.

On the negative side, Langford--a solid perimeter shooting in college--shot 1 for 3 from the 3-point line on Tuesday. On the season, he is shooting a very concerning 26.5 percent from the shorter, college 3-point line. Langford’s free throw percentage is 71.8 percent, which would indicate that he has the ability to be a positive 3-point shooter at the NBA level, but isn’t a huge indicator of long-term success. So we will simply need to see more repetitions of Langford’s jumper to get a better handle of it. But as of now it seems that he will be a primarily midrange-focused shooter, at least in his NBA rookie season. But if he can’t develop that 3-point shot long-term, it definitely changes his ceiling as a prospect, even with improvements in his ball handling and elsewhere.


But when you are talking about a 19-year old with an NBA-ready frame, shot creation skills, strong defensive instincts and a team-first attitude, a lack of a projectable jumpshot does little to dissuade me from taking them somewhere in the bottom half of the top 10 at worst.

Keldon Johnson, Kentucky (vs Missouri): 5 PTS (1/6 FG), 6 REB, 1 AST, 1 STL, 3/3 FT

Keldon Johnson dropped out of Schanowski’s NBA Draft Big Board top-10 after version 3.0. He has done little to show that he deserves to be back in the top 10, but still seems like a player worthy of serious lottery consideration. On Tuesday, Johnson was third on the team in shot attempts, going 1/6 from the field (0/2 from 3-point range). Though, Mizzou’s guards shot the ball well, Johnson was great on help side defense, especially when it came to disrupting drives by getting his hand on the ball.

He plays within the team concept on offense, taking smart shots and picking his spots well. But when things get tight down the stretch, Johnson has not showcased the ability to go get an easy bucket in one-on-one situations. His passing is extremely underwhelming and he has yet to reach 5 assists in a game (NCAA career-high is 4 AST). Johnson only makes the simple skip pass right now and his lack of playmaking ability is a huge concern when coupled with his below average finishing at the rim.

If Johnson can’t string together great performances the rest of the season, a few big scoring nights against elite competition could do a lot to help his draft stock.

Johnson has shown that he can be a solid catch-and-shoot option on offense and a good defender in the right defensive scheme, which means that he definitely can be a good top-end starter in the NBA. But for Johnson to have a ceiling that is higher than “good NBA starter”, we will need to see more in terms of shot creation skills and finishing at the rim.

Big Ten reportedly talking about expanding conference basketball schedule

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USA TODAY

Big Ten reportedly talking about expanding conference basketball schedule

Conference play could be getting a bit longer in the Big Ten.

According to a Monday report from ESPN's Jeff Goodman, there are talks about expanding the Big Ten conference basketball schedule from 18 games to 20 games.

Commissioner Jim Delany told Goodman that while there hasn't been a vote among the league's coaches yet, there are ongoing discussions about lengthening conference play by a couple of games.

Conference play expanded a decade ago, when the number of league games jumped from 16 to 18 for the 2007-08 season.

In order for there to be enough days in between games for players, an expanded league schedule would mean the beginning of conference play coming earlier in December. Recently, conference play has typically started around New Year's. Of course, there will be a week earlier start to conference play this season with the Big Ten Tournament — at Madison Square Garden in New York — a week earlier than usual, wrapping a full week before Selection Sunday.

Similar moves have been made in football, with the Big Ten starting a nine-game conference slate last fall. It's meant league games in September — a no-no in the past — and this season will feature a conference matchup in the season's first week, when Indiana and Ohio State play on Aug. 31.

Expanding conference play in college basketball would have a similar effect as it has had on schedules in football. With fewer non-conference slots to fill, those games become more important to a team's NCAA tournament resume. It forces teams to schedule more high-profile opponents and eliminate games against small schools that generate little interest during the season's first couple months.

The ACC, a league that often runs neck and neck with the Big Ten in the debate over which is America's top basketball conference, announced it will be moving to a 20-game schedule last July, with that starting in the 2019-20 season.

Michigan State head coach Tom Izzo shared some thoughts on the subject with Goodman, saying he expects the move to happen.

"I personally see us going to a 20-game schedule," Izzo told Goodman. "I don't think there's any question it's going to happen — and I'm not overly against it."

Ohio State has its new head coach in Butler's Chris Holtmann

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USA TODAY

Ohio State has its new head coach in Butler's Chris Holtmann

Ohio State found its next head basketball coach, going to one of Thad Matta's former employers to find the longtime coach's successor.

The school announced Friday morning that Butler head coach Chris Holtmann is the Buckeyes' new head coach.

Holtmann spent the past three seasons as the head coach at Butler, posting a 70-31 record and making NCAA tournament appearances in all three of those seasons, including a trip to the Sweet Sixteen in March. He was named the Big East Coach of the Year this past season.

Holtmann spent two seasons as an assistant at Ohio under former Illinois head coach John Groce, a former Matta assistant, before serving as the head coach at Gardner-Webb for three seasons. Holtmann left Gardner-Webb for an assistant-coaching job at Butler, though he was quickly promoted to interim head coach and then head coach in Indianapolis.

Holtmann takes over for Matta, who himself was the Butler head coach in the 2000-01 season before becoming the all-time wins leader at Ohio State. Matta's mostly successful tenure was ended earlier this week, when athletics director Gene Smith saw recruiting misses teaming with declining win totals to create a dip in Matta's success.

This week has been dominated by rumors and declarations of lack of interest from numerous candidates and possible candidates for the job. Xavier head coach Chris Mack and Creighton head coach Greg McDermott both made their decisions to stay at their current schools known via social media, and a report linking Bulls head coach Fred Hoiberg to the job forced a no-interest comment from Hoiberg, too.

Despite those repeated "no thank yous," though, Ohio State is still seen to be one of the best jobs in college basketball thanks to one of the highest-profile athletics departments and one of the best conferences in the country, providing ample resources.

Recruiting will be a big expectation for Holtmann, as Matta's performance in that area dipped near the end of his tenure. The Buckeyes missed the NCAA tournament in each of the past two seasons, while Holtmann just took Butler to a No. 4 seed in the Big Dance, the highest in that program's history.