Cameron Payne

Could Derrick Walton Jr. become the solution at backup PG?

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Could Derrick Walton Jr. become the solution at backup PG?

Former Miami Heat two-way player Derrick Walton Jr. is reported to be nearing a deal with the Bulls. In an interview with The Athletic, it was stated: "Walton, 23, says he knows where he’ll play next season. An agreement is in place, but his agent, Mark Bartelstein, is requiring him to sit on the news until next week. All Walton can put out publicly is this: 'Long story short, I’m good. I’m going to a great situation. All I can say.' "

And while it is not yet known if the potential contract will be a two-way deal or not, Walton would provide an intriguing lottery ticket for the Bulls. 

The team mostly ignored looking for a backup point guard on the market. There is obviously a belief in the organization that Cameron Payne will have some internal growth, making him the best option. And the trade of Jerian Grant for essentially nothing, shows even more that Payne is there guy. Retaining Ryan Arcidiacono is a nice move considering the hustle that he showed last season at both the G League and NBA level, but it still leaves the Bulls thin in terms of established backup PGs behind Kris Dunn. And that is where Walton comes into play. 

Walton was a four-year player at the University of Michigan, where he played in some big-time games and showed immense leadership potential. But in terms of strictly on the court skills, there is one thing that he does extremely well: space the floor. 

In his four years at Michigan, Walton took a total of 581 3-point attempts, and knocked them down at a 40.1 percent rate. His elite shooting is enough to make him a legitimate rotation player for Fred Hoiberg. And while Payne still may develop into a better player, his outside shooting is his calling card despite never being elite at that skill at the NBA level. And in fact, when you compare he and Walton’s stats from college, the G League and the NBA, it becomes apparent who is the better shooter right now.

3-point percentage at NCAA level: Payne- 35.9 percent, Walton- 40.1 percent
3-point percentage at G League level: Payne- 33.8 percent, Walton- 37.7 percent
3-point percentage at NBA level: Payne- 34 percent, Walton- 41.2 percent

Now obviously, there is a “small sample size alert” for the NBA level, as Walton has only taken 17 3-pointers at the NBA level in his limited time with the Miami Heat. But these numbers show that even dating back to their freshman years of college, Walton has been the more efficient shooter from 3-point range.

Cameron Payne has the edge when it comes to playmaking, and this is based off of the fact that Payne has maintained an assist rate above 30 percent through all of his G League stints, while also having a low turnover rate (9.9 percent). Walton didn’t come close to Payne in terms of G League assist rate, and his 17.9 percent turnover rate at the G League level shows that his decision-making has yet to catch up to his shooting. 

Ultimately, Walton is going to be most effective as an off-ball guard who can make quick decisions, and knockdown the 3-point shot at a high level. Though if Summer League was any indication, his passing out of the pick-and-roll is getting better. And while Payne certainly is a good shooter, his game is much more predicated on having the ball in his hands, and playing in the pick-and-roll. With so many players on the Bulls who can create their own shot, Walton could end up being the cleanest fit with this constantly evolving Bulls roster. 


 

John Paxson delivered transparency, not Brazilian music

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John Paxson delivered transparency, not Brazilian music

It’s what every fan base deserves, along with players on a roster where tough conversations must be had to set a course for the present in order to secure a better future.

Transparency.

It’s ugly and while not aesthetically pleasing to the eye, everyone can see what the Bulls are doing for the remainder of the NBA season. For the paying customers who still fill the seats at the United Center, it’s a “cry now so hopefully you laugh later” proposition.

Bulls Executive-Vice President John Paxson addressed the media Tuesday and said what we all knew to be true, what everyone knew what was coming.

He didn’t stand up in front of cameras and tape recorders and ask, “Do you like Brazilian music?”

They’re tanking.

They’re putting a little bit more sugar to go with it but it’s old-fashioned ‘tussin for the next several weeks.

All of this is due to sight unseen—unless you watch college basketball or cue up European basketball highlights.

When you see Michigan State’s Jaren Jackson take two hard dribbles from the top of the key, spin and dunk while being fouled, it makes sense.

When Arizona’s DeAndre Ayton help on a driving guard to cut off a lane, recover to block a 3-point shot and run the floor for a layup in a six-second span, it makes sense.

When Duke’s Marvin Bagley III seals his defender with one arm, catches with his left hand and finishes on the opposite side of the rim with ease, it all makes sense and kudos to the Bulls for not trying to fool a smart public with useless rhetoric.

Every loss counts, of course, but the key thing about the NBA is this: No matter where a team picks, bad franchises make the worst of a good opportunity and good franchises make the best of any situation.

If the Bulls are the latter, it’ll show itself whether they pick fourth or second or sixth. This draft’s best player went 13th, Donovan Mitchell from the Utah Jazz. Lauri Markkanen is in competition for best player after Mitchell and he went seventh.

This was inevitable from the moment the Bulls traded Jimmy Butler on draft night. Although Kris Dunn has turned out to be a revelation and Markkanen could be a superstar, none of the micro wins should take away from the macro vision of this franchise, chief reason why Paxson has reasserted himself in the last year.

Paxson just framed it in the vein of long-term evaluation in announcing Cristiano Felicio and David Nwaba will replace veterans Robin Lopez and Justin Holiday in the starting lineup, while Jerian Grant will see his playing time cut for Cameron Payne.

“Seeing some of our young guys play consistently, we’ve learned a lot about them,” Paxson said. “The hard thing when you do things like this is you’re asking certain people to sacrifice roles and minutes. And oftentimes, it’s veteran guys. That’s what we’re asking some of our vets to do right now—sacrifice some time on the floor and roles they’ve been very good in. That’s never an easy thing.”

Lopez and Holiday have been good soldiers through this process, especially helping navigate a fragile locker room after the crazy start to the season when Bobby Portis had enough of Nikola Mirotic in a practice and unleashed holy hell on a season that was supposed to be a quiet, boring losing season.

“I know what it’s like to be asked to take a lesser role,” Paxson said. “Players have pride. So it’s hard. I don’t take that lightly at all. It’s just the position we’re in as a young team, 20-37 with a lot of young guys and several who we haven’t really had the chance to see play much this year. For us to make the proper evaluation in terms of who fits us moving forward, this is something we have to do.”

Lopez has had a solid season, with career-highs in scoring and assists. Holiday’s scoring has nearly doubled this season and he’ll garner some attention around the draft in the trade market.

But with the Bulls being eighth of the eight bad teams, they need to get Super Bad (with a nod to James Brown) in the next several weeks. It’s not that the rebuild is steps ahead, it’s that other teams are better at being incompetent than the Bulls—and they’ll also be doing whatever’s necessary to secure a draft position.

At least the Bulls’ competence has come in the form of long-term answers. Certainly at the end of the year, one can lament Zach LaVine saving the Bulls from losses to the Timberwolves and Magic with late-game plays that cements the belief he could be a front-facing player—especially with restricted free agency coming this summer.

If Payne happens to be a useful NBA player in the process, it’s gravy but the Bulls aren’t really expecting it.

Fred Hoiberg has been pumping up Payne publicly by referencing him playing the role of Isaiah Thomas in the playoff preparation last spring, but he hasn’t played NBA level basketball in over a year.

And when he was on the floor, for that ill-fated period after last year’s deadline when Hoiberg was playing 11 guys without a real plan to win, Payne looked overmatched and overwhelmed.

“We want to see him as a point guard, especially when you’re running with the second unit, and the way Fred wants to play, play with pace, defend your position, compete every night and stay within yourself,” Paxson said. “His role is to get us into offense quickly and efficiently and make the right play with the ball.”

Felicio has taken a step back in terms of his development after steady improvement over the last two years, but in the big picture they’re casualties in the NBA’s cost of doing business.

And if you believe it’s anything else besides what you’re seeing, you might believe Paxson is truly asking if you like Brazilian music.

Will anyone on the current Bulls roster make the 2020 All-Star team?

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Will anyone on the current Bulls roster make the 2020 All-Star team?

For the first time since 1988, Chicago is set to host an NBA All-Star Game

In 2020, basketball fans from around the globe will descend on the United Center to catch a glimpse at the very best the Association has to offer. Whether any Bulls player fits that criteria remains to be seen. 

At the beginning of what is likely a long rebuild, the Bulls roster isn't filled with obvious future All-Stars. And unlike in 1988 at Chicago Stadium -- when Michael Jordan started and dropped 40 -- getting a player in the game is questionable. Here's a breakdown of each current player's chances: 

Nahhhh.  

Cameron Payne: In a league loaded with point guards, Payne doesn't rank anywhere near the top. Pitched as the possible point guard of the future in last year's deal that sent Taj Gibson and Doug McDermott to Oklahoma City, Payne has played in just 11 games with the Bulls. Barring some miraculous development, he won't be reppin' Chicago at ASG Weekend. 

Kay Felder: He may turn into a heat-check guy, but he's no Isaiah Thomas. 

Quincy Pondexter: He beat the odds when he returned to an NBA floor after a myriad of serious knee injuries. The odds of an All-Star appearance are much greater, though. 

Jerian Grant: The 25-year-old point guard out of Notre Dame is getting his chance to run the show... he's shooting just over 30 percent. 

Cristiano Felicio: Big Cris has made huge strides in his short time in the NBA. Becoming one of the best big men in the East, though, seems a tad unrealistic. 

Paul Zipser: Until he improves his 3-point shot (32 percent in his career), he's not a candidate. 

Anything is possible... but probably not 

David Nwaba: The guard has an incredibly high motor, but it's not often that a strong, energetic defender with clear offensive limitations gets an invite. 

Bobby Portis and Nikola Mirotic: Given the sour relationship between these two, it's probably one or the other. Portis would have to consistently hit his outside shot along with rebounding like a menace. Since Mirotic is a below average defender, he'd have to have an incredible offensive first half to earn a spot. 

Denzel Valentine: It's fairly obvious that the Bulls did not get the 2016 version of Draymond Green. Could be a solid role player still.   

Justin Holiday: On pace to have a forgettable offensive season, Holiday's a terrific perimiter defender who can get hot for one half of a season. Right? 

Robin Lopez: The trusted veteran in the Bulls locker room would be 31 come the 2020 Game. He's yet to make an All-Star roster in his career, so this "it's possible" nod is just out of respect for RoLo continuing to be a positive influence on this version of the Baby Bulls. 

Kris Dunn: Where there's hype, there's not always All-Star appearances. Dunn has looked better of late with the Bulls, but he still struggles to shoot, a pretty important factor in determining ASG worthiness. 

Legit shot

Zach LaVine: This may be a bit overzealous considering LaVine hasn't even played a game with the Bulls yet. The 22-year-old has already left several marks on previous All-Star Weekends though, winning the Slam Dunk Contest twice. If he fully recovers from his torn ACL, his scoring and playmaking could land him a spot. If not, he could make an appearance in the Slam Dunk Contest or 3-point contest (38 percent for his career). 

Lauri Markkanen: He's turned heads in his rookie campaign, being lazily compared to Kristaps Porzingis. Assuming he'll continue to get more touches and flourish offensively, it's not a stretch that he'll be a 22-year-old All-Star.