Derrick Rose

Top 10 Bulls of the decade: From the Rose years to the rebuild

Top 10 Bulls of the decade: From the Rose years to the rebuild

The 2010s are about to be in the books, so we took a look back at the top 10 players from that decade of the Bulls franchise. A handful of different factors went into the equation, including longevity, per-game performance, team success and individual accolades such as All-Star appearances, Defensive Player of the Year votes and MVPs.

10. Nikola Mirotic (2014-2018; 243 games): 11.4 points, 5.4 rebounds, 1.8 3-pointers

No Bulls player made more 3-pointers in the 2010s than Mirotic, who poured in 432 triples in three-plus seasons. He never fully reached his potential in Chicago – and a right hook from Bobby Portis essentially ended his time in Chicago – after finishing second to Andrew Wiggins in the 2015 Rookie of the Year voting, but Mirotic had some stellar stretches for the Bulls. Most notably, his red-hot Marches and his sparkling December/January stretch that allowed the Bulls to net a first-round pick from the New Orleans Pelicans in exchange for him.

In addition to being the 3-point champion of the 2010s, Mirotic ranks seventh in points, seventh in rebounds, eighth in games, eighth in steals and eighth in blocks. Whether you liked him or thought he was overrated, Mirotic put up numbers for the Bulls.

9. Lauri Markkanen (2017-2019; 120 games): 16.7 points, 8.2 rebounds, 2.2 3-pointers

Too soon to put him on the list? Maybe, but in just two seasons Markkanen ranked 12th in points and 11th in rebounds over the last decade for the Bulls. He’s also 8th in made 3-pointers and gets a few added bonus points for being the potential face of the franchise in the post-Jimmy Butler era.

Markkanen has posted impressive numbers despite the fact that the Bulls have been tanking around him the last two seasons, plus a head-coaching change right after his return from an elbow injury and a heart scare at the end of last season. He provides one of the most unique skill sets the franchise has ever seen and should only improve in Year 3 with a clean bill of health, a stable head-coaching situation and more talent around him.

8. Robin Lopez (2016-2019; 219 games): 10.5 points, 5.0 rebounds, 1.1 blocks

This is the one that probably has you scratching your head. In terms of on-court production, Lopez quietly put together three really nice seasons. Among Bulls in the 2010s, he ranks 10th in games played, 10th in points, 10th in rebounds and fourth in blocks. He’s also second in field goal percentage. So the numbers give him credibility on the list despite him playing just three seasons in Chicago.

But his off-the-court productivity is noteworthy, too. He was the veteran leader both with the Three Amigos fiasco of a season and during two years of rebuilds. He dealt with DNP’s, 12-minute first quarters and then 36 straight minutes on the bench, and then watched the Bulls draft his replacement in Wendell Carter Jr. Lopez then took Carter under his watch and helped the 19-year-old rookie acclimate to the NBA. He was also one of the key veterans in keeping the peace during Jim Boylen’s wild first week as head coach. Lopez was never an All-Star in Chicago, but he left a great impression on the entire organization.

7. Pau Gasol (2014-2016; 150 games): 17.6 points, 11.4 rebounds, 2.0 blocks

Gasol was the consolation prize for Carmelo Anthony but proved to be one of the best signings from the draft class. He had a career rejuvenation in Chicago, making two All-Star appearances, helping lead the Bulls to the postseason twice, and posting some gaudy numbers in his ages 34 and 35 campaigns.

Despite playing just two seasons with the Bulls, his ranks among the 2010s Bulls include: eighth in points, sixth in rebounds, ninth in assists, third in blocks and 10th in games. It happened while Jimmy Butler was ascending to stardom and that buried Gasol’s accomplishments some, but the Spaniard was a great addition in Chicago.

6. Carlos Boozer (2010-2014; 280 games): 15.5 points, 9.0 rebounds, 2.0 assists

Stop punching the air. Though he was certainly not the main target during the historic 2010 free agent class, Boozer put together four solid seasons with the Bulls. Though he was never able to replicate the numbers he posted during his Jazz days, Boozer still finished the 2010s ranked fifth in points, third in rebounds, seventh in steals, 10th in blocks and seventh in games.

He’ll always be remembered as “the guy the Bulls signed instead of LeBron James” but he wound up working out for the Bulls. Holdat.

5. Taj Gibson (2009-2017): 9.4 points, 6.4 rebounds, 1.2 blocks

No. 5 on our list, but forever No. 1 in our hearts. No player appeared in more games or played more minutes for the Bulls in the 2010s than Gibson, who finished third in points, second in rebounds, fourth in steals and first in blocks. Along the way, Gibson spent more than half his games coming off the bench in favor of Carlos Boozer and Pau Gasol, all the while being the consummate teammate and locker room presence.

He also provided the lasting in-game memory of the 2010s Bulls when he dunked all over Dwyane Wade in Game 1 of the 2011 Eastern Conference Finals. Let’s just forget that he was traded to the Oklahoma City Thunder for Cameron Payne and remember the good times.

4. Luol Deng (2010-2014): 16.9 points, 6.4 rebounds, 2.7 assists, 1.0 steals

Deng had played five NBA seasons before the 2010s rolled around but enjoyed his best seasons in that era. He was named an All-Star twice while leading the NBA in minutes per game both seasons, went toe-to-toe with LeBron James in some unforgettable playoff series, and hit his fair share of clutch shots.

In the 2010s alone, Deng ranked fourth in points, fourth in rebounds, fifth in assists, third in steals, fifth in 3-pointers, sixth in blocks and sixth in games. An all-around, two-way player who certainly has an argument to be even higher on this list.

3. Jimmy Butler (2011-2017): 15.6 points, 4.8 rebounds, 3.1 assists, 1.5 steals

Butler made one of the most unlikely rises to stardom of any player in the 2010s, from late first-round pick to four-time All-Star in the span of four seasons. Butler watched as Luol Deng, Joakim Noah and Derrick Rose all departed before him to make him the face of the franchise. Though Butler never got the Bulls past the second round of the playoffs and wound up being the outgoing piece to begin the Bulls’ rebuild in 2017, he was still one of the team’s best players of the last decade.

He ranked second in points, fifth in rebounds, third in assists, first in steals, fifth in blocks, first in made free throws and third in games. It’s a shame neither side could make the relationship work that would have allowed Butler to add on to those numbers the last few seasons, but both parties seem better off.

2. Joakim Noah (2009-2016): 10.3 points, 10.4 rebounds, 3.6 assists, 1.5 blocks

Noah played his first two NBA seasons in the 2000s but was a budding star by the time the 2010s rolled around. All Noah did in seven Bulls seasons was earn two All-Star berths, win Defensive Player of the Year and finish fifth in the MVP voting in 2014.

Noah is littered across the 2010s Bulls leaderboard: Sixth in points, first in rebounds, second in assists, second in steals, second in blocks, second in games and second in minutes. Injuries eventually took their toll on Noah, who was a shell of himself by the time the Bulls moved on in 2016, but he was an easy choice for No. 2 on this list.

1. Derrick Rose (2009-2016): 20.4 points, 3.6 rebounds, 6.2 assists, 0.8 steals

Rose ended the 2000s in style by winning Rookie of the Year honors in 2009, but he was just getting started. Over the next seven seasons (six years), Rose became the youngest MVP in league history, went to three All-Star Games, signed a shoe deal with adidas and was the driving force behind a pair of top seeds in the Eastern Conference, including a 62-win campaign in 2011.

Among the 2010s Bulls, Rose ranks first in points, first in assists, sixth in steals, eighth in blocks, fourth in 3-pointers, fourth in games and fifth in minutes. Debate his legacy in Chicago all you’d like, but there wasn’t a better or more accomplished player during the last decade than Pooh.

 

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Bulls Talk Podcast: Sam Smith on his new book with Derrick Rose, 'I’ll Show You'

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AP

Bulls Talk Podcast: Sam Smith on his new book with Derrick Rose, 'I’ll Show You'

On this edition of the Bulls Talk podcast, Hall of Fame writer Sam Smith discusses his new book with Derrick Rose, “I’ll Show You”.

1:35       On the perception that Rose was misunderstood by the media and that he didn’t want to play

10:45    On Rose being a quiet introvert and getting him to open up for the book

17:20    Was Sam surprised by how open Rose was for the book?

22:45    On Rose being socially aware and what Sam learned about him

30:15    On Rose saying he did not want to be drafted by the Bulls on draft night after hearing a conversation between Gar Forman and BJ Armstrong

38:55    On the narrative that Rose didn’t want to recruit other stars to come play for the Bulls, and why Rose was upset with the Bulls organization

45:37    On Rose’s relationship with Joakim Noah and their friendship

50:05    Should the Bulls retire #1? Does Rose belong in the Hall of Fame?

55:15    On Rose’s love for chess

59:40    Sam on why the Bulls will surprise people this season

Listen to the full podcast here or via the embedded player below:

Bulls Talk Podcast

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Derrick Rose believes he is a Hall of Famer in his own right

Derrick Rose believes he is a Hall of Famer in his own right

In the run-up to the 2019 NBA season, Derrick Rose has embarked on a press tour to promote the impending release of his autobiography “I’ll Show You”. Yesterday afternoon, the former Bulls great made headlines for pondering the possibility of a Detroit Pistons championship run and for comments he made on the nature of his personal legacy in an interview on Sirius XM Radio:

He continued: “These same expectations I have on me now, they were thrown on me in sixth grade… Imagine being 12 or 13 and everywhere you go, people are putting their burdens on you, like, ‘You’re gonna be the one to make it.’” 

The nature of this quote is in no way controversial. While Rose will in all likelihood be the first player ever to win an NBA MVP award but not be inducted into the real-life Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (Basketball Reference gives him a 10.52 percent chance), he is certainly entitled to a sense of pride in what he has accomplished on the court. Born and raised in Chicago, Rose was a top-five recruit coming out of high school, the no. 1 overall pick in the 2008 NBA Draft and has amassed a Rookie of the Year award, three All-Star appearances, an All-NBA selection and, of course, that 2011 MVP over the course of his career. 

 

Count among his accomplishments the career rejuvenation he set into motion last season with the Minnesota Timberwolves, as well, when he averaged 18.0 points and 4.3 assists per game on 48.2/37/85.6 shooting splits. He parlayed that campaign into a two-year, $15 million contract with this Pistons this offseason. In the eyes of many, it would have been unthinkable to commit that kind of money over multiple years to Rose as recently as a year ago.

For his history in Chicago, though, Rose will long be revered, even if the totality of his career falls short of the Hall.

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