Mark Buehrle

Marlins pitcher puts White Sox on Perfecto Watch on anniversary of Mark Buehrle's perfect game

Marlins pitcher puts White Sox on Perfecto Watch on anniversary of Mark Buehrle's perfect game

Rick Renteria called it "eerie."

Ten years to the day after Mark Buehrle delivered one of the most memorable moments in White Sox history with a perfect game against the Tampa Bay Rays, there was another Perfecto Watch on the South Side.

Miami Marlins starting pitcher Caleb Smith didn't reach "call your neighbors" territory, but he retired the first 17 batters he faced in order, taking a perfect game into the sixth inning Tuesday night against the White Sox.

"I'll be honest, it was a little eerie for us," Renteria said after the 5-1 loss. "I kept thinking, I wasn't here 10 years ago for that. And he was working that, and I was like, 'Hey, (pitching coach Don Cooper), I don't like what I'm seeing here.'"

Smith was excellent, striking out nine of those first 17 hitters he put down in order. On a night when White Sox fans were celebrating the anniversary of Buehrle's feat, this was not the type of celebration they had in mind.

"You start to see," White Sox shortstop Ryan Goins said. "Anybody says they don’t feel it, he can say he doesn’t feel it but everybody knows the perfect game is going on. ... But he did a god job keeping us off-balance today."

The White Sox broke up the Perfecto Watch with two outs in the bottom of the sixth, Adam Engel putting an end to Smith's stretch of five consecutive strikeouts with a walk. Leury Garcia followed that with a walk of his own, and Jon Jay put an end to the no-hit bid and the shutout with an RBI single.

Smith gave up a base hit to AJ Reed the following inning, but he finished his effort with one run and just four base runners allowed over seven innings. Smith's had himself a nice season for the last-place Marlins, his ERA down to 3.30 after Tuesday night's game.

The four base runners the White Sox got against Smith were the only ones they had on a silent night for the bats. A pair of Marlins relievers followed up Smith's work with two 1-2-3 innings. The White Sox struck out 10 times.

A decade later, Renteria might have been one of the few in the White Sox dugout putting the history together with what was happening on the field Tuesday night, but that didn't make Smith any less dominant on the anniversary of Buehrle's dominance.

"I don’t think we are thinking that far back," Goins said. "We are just trying to go up there and have good at-bats, honestly. He did a great job of not really leaving anything in the middle of the plate to hit, mixing his pitches up and throwing everything for a strike. And then throwing chase pitches when he needed to."

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White Sox Talk Podcast: The 10th anniversary of Mark Buehrle's perfect game

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NBC SPORTS CHICAGO

White Sox Talk Podcast: The 10th anniversary of Mark Buehrle's perfect game

Chuck Garfien and Steve Stone take a look back at Mark Buehrle's perfect game. How did Buehrle do it? How did Dewayne Wise make that catch?

Plus, Buehrle and A.J. Pierzynski talk about how Buehrle actually told Pierzynski before taking that field that day that he would throw a perfect game and more.

Listen to the entire podcast here or in the embedded player below.

White Sox Talk Podcast

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These four legends make up the White Sox Mount Rushmore

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USA TODAY

These four legends make up the White Sox Mount Rushmore

Who is the Greatest of All Time? Inspired by Sunday Night Football's promo featuring Bulls legend Michael Jordan, we've put together a Mount Rushmore of the greatest players in the history of all five of Chicago's teams. These are Chicago's GOATs.

Crafting a White Sox Mount Rushmore is no easy task. With more than 100 years of history, it's tough to narrow the field down to four. In this case, the franchise leader in games played, Luke Appling, was left off the list, as were fan favorites Nellie Fox and Harold Baines. Also left off was perhaps the most dominant pitcher in franchise history: Chris Sale. Regardless, here are the four players we deem most worthy of the honors. Let's get out our chisels and get to work.

Ed Walsh

A legendary Deadball Era hurler, Walsh posted a 1.82 career ERA which remains the best in major league history. His prized pitch was his devastating spitball, which was legal at the time. He helped pitch the 1906 Hitless Wonder White Sox to a World Series title over the heavily favored Cubs. Walsh's 1908 season is the stuff of legend. He won 40 games — something nobody has done since — while logging an unfathomable 464 innings. His 269 strikeouts stood as a White Sox record until Sale topped it in 2015. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1946.

Minnie Miñoso

Known as the "Cuban Comet," as well as "Mr. White Sox," Miñoso in 1951 became the first black player in White Sox history and was a trailblazer for black Latinos in Major League Baseball. He was a dynamic performer, combining power, speed and plate discipline with excellent defense in the outfield. He had seven All-Star seasons, six of them with White Sox, and won three Gold Gloves, two of them with White Sox (the award was introduced in 1957, midway through his major league career). Minnie played big league baseball in five decades, including cameo appearances with the White Sox in 1976 — he had a hit at age 50 — and 1980. Miñoso's No. 9 was retired by the White Sox in 1983, and he remained a team ambassador until his death in 2015.

Frank Thomas

Thomas was the Big Hurt, one of the greatest right-handed hitters in major league history. He hit 521 career home runs, including 448 with the White Sox, a franchise record. He is the only player in White Sox history to win multiple MVP awards (in 1993 and 1994). His .419 career on-base percentage is the highest by any living right-handed hitter with at least 3,000 career plate appearances. He had nine seasons of at least 100 runs, 100 RBIs and 100 walks, topped only by Barry Bonds (10), Lou Gehrig (11) and Babe Ruth (11). The White Sox retired his No. 35 in 2010, and he was part of the Hall of Fame's Class of 2014.

Mark Buehrle

From 38th-round draft pick to World Series champion, Buehrle continually defied the odds. A model of consistency, Buehrle logged 14 straight seasons of at least 200 innings (the first 11 with the White Sox). Despite rarely topping 90 miles an hour, he managed to throw two no-hitters, including a perfect game. Part of the celebrated 2005 White Sox rotation, Buehrle tossed a complete game in the ALCS, then made a start and earned a save in the World Series against the Astros. Buehrle had 214 career wins, 161 with the White Sox, and in 2017 his No. 56 was retired on the South Side.