Ricky Wagner

Bears sign Charles Leno Jr. to four-year extension

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USA TODAY

Bears sign Charles Leno Jr. to four-year extension

The 2017 season will no longer be a "prove it" year for Bears offensive tackle Charles Leno Jr.

The Bears announced on Wednesday they have signed Leno to a four-year contract extension that will keep him in Chicago through the 2021 season.

Leno's extension is expected to be worth $38 million with $21.5 million guaranteed, according to the Chicago Tribune. His average annual value of $9.5 million would tie him with Detroit Lions right tackle Ricky Wagner as the NFL's 15th highest paid offensive tackle (in terms of AAV).

Leno will become the second offensive lineman that Bears GM Ryan Pace has extended in the the past 12 months. The Bears signed Kyle Long to a four-year, $40 million contract extension just days before the 2016 season opener.

Leno, who was selected by the Bears in the 7th round of the 2014 NFL Draft out of Bosie State, has started 29 straight games at left tackle after taking over for Jermon Bushrod in Week 4 of the 2015 season.

The Bears now have all five of their starting offensive lineman locked in for the next two years (Josh Sitton and Bobby Massie's contract's expire following the 2018 season).

Bears NFL Draft Preview: OL core in place but looking for edge upgrades

Bears NFL Draft Preview: OL core in place but looking for edge upgrades

CSNChicago.com Bears Insider John "Moon" Mullin goes position-by-position as the Bears approach the 2017 Draft, taking a look at what the Bears have, what they might need and what draft day could have in store. Fifth in a series.

Bears pre-draft situation
 
Neither Bobby Massie nor Charles Leno Jr. established themselves as close to dominant edge blockers through the 2016 season. Massie struggled early before settling in over the last half-season; Leno was expected to take a definitive next step but did not. As a result, tackle was an offseason priority, and the Bears made a play for ex-Baltimore Raven Ricky Wagner before he was lured to the Detroit Lions on a five-year deal that set a new standard for right tackles. The Bears then targeted Tom Compton, primarily a backup over five NFL seasons and ostensibly in competition for the role of swing tackle.
 
The interior has been cited as a strength with the axis of Kyle Long and Josh Sitton flanking Cody Whitehair. Long is coming off serious shoulder and ankle injuries, elected not to have shoulder surgery, but is expected back in full to open the season. Sitton earned Pro Bowl alternate status. Whitehair stepped in when Hroniss Grasu tore an ACL in an August practice and missed just two snaps all season.

Projected pre-draft starters
 
LT    Charles Leno
LG    Josh Sitton
C      Cody Whitehair
RG   Kyle Long
RT    Bobby Massie

Reserves

Tom Compton, Cornelius Edison, Hroniss Grasu, Eric Kush, William Poehls, Cyril Richardson.

Bears draft priority: Low
 
The "low" priority for the position stands in relation to need levels at other positions; the Bears need upgrades on the offensive line, most notably at tackle, and GM Ryan Pace has drafted an offensive lineman within the first three rounds in each of his two Bears drafts (Grasu 2015 third round, Whitehair 2016 second round).

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The problem this draft is that it is considered one of the poorest for offensive linemen. Loose evaluations suggest that the draft could go 15 picks or more in the first round before a tackle is selected. Compare that with: Four tackles went in the first 16 picks of the '16 draft. Three went top-13 in 2015, six in the top 24.  The 2014 draft saw four tackles picked in the first 16. Four tackles and two guards were picked among the first 11 of 2013.
 
This year, just finding a little quality depth will be an accomplishment.

Keep an eye on:
 
Forrest Lamp, G/T, Western Kentucky — One of several "top" prospects who may fall out of the first round. Lamp lacks some of the physical traits preferred in tackles but is willing to relocate. "I like to watch Ali Marpet, Cody Whitehair, Zack Martin," Lamp said during the Scouting Combine. "Those guys were all left tackles in school who got bumped inside. Similar to what I've been hearing [for myself], so I watched them all last year."
 
Cameron Lee, G/T, Illinois State — Bears arranged a private session with Lee, who started at both guard and tackle for ISU. The versatility is critical and attractive to teams looking to fill "swing" role inside or outside. Small-school prospect could drop into Bears' range on Day 3.

Bears free-agency analysis: Offseason OL pattern holds with Tom Compton

Bears free-agency analysis: Offseason OL pattern holds with Tom Compton

This is the second in a series analyzing the Bears' decision-making during the 2017 free-agency period.

From 3/13: Bears free agency analysis: Alshon Jeffery non-deal left an understandable void

In what now looks to be a pattern under GM Ryan Pace, the Bears for the third straight offseason have gone after upgrades on their offensive line. Not always first-tier additions, but always a search for an improvement and more competition, and if something doesn't work, Pace does not stay wedded to a decision that hasn't worked.
 
The 2015 offseason started with signing guard Vladimir Ducasse and then center Will Montgomery. Ducasse started a handful of games, didn't pan out and wasn't brought back. Montgomery suffered a broken leg, went on IR and was done, with the Bears turning to Hroniss Grasu.
 
Last offseason saw Bobbie Massie signed for right tackle, Ted Larsen for a guard spot and Manny Ramirez for center. Ramirez retired before the season. Larsen, who played only because of injuries to Kyle Long and Josh Sitton, wasn't coming back and signed a three-year deal with the Miami Dolphins. Massie's situation is to be determined, with rumors last week that he would be cut.
 
That didn't happen, all part of what effectively became a domino strategy on an offensive line the Bears view as a roster strength.

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Among Pace's first probes into the market this year was after tackle Rick Wagner, who opted instead for the Detroit Lions and their surprising offer of $14.5 million guaranteed on a total package of $47.5 million over five years. Wagner's price made him the highest-paid pure right tackle in the NFL and was not within the parameters the Bears had established for the former Baltimore Raven.
 
When the money for tackles spiked explosively — Wagner, Riley Reiff ($58.8 million, Minnesota Vikings), Matt Kalil ($55 million, Carolina Panthers), Russell Okung ($53 million, Los Angeles Chargers) — Pace and the Bears instead kept Massie in place. Massie's $4.2 million base for 2017 is not guaranteed and contingent on his making the Week 1 roster.
 
At the same time, Pace moved on Tom Compton, a backup with Washington and the Atlanta Falcons, with 10 career starts and who'd also attracted interest from the Falcons, Lions and San Francisco 49ers.
 
"I don't know any specifics," Compton said of the Bears' plans for him. "I know they'll plug me in to see where I fit in but I'm not too sure what their plan is yet."

Compton has worked as a swing tackle with Atlanta, which runs a zone-blocking scheme similar to what the Bears have operated the past several years.

"I'm not too familiar with what's going on here," Compton said, "but it's pretty similar to what I'm used to, a lot of zone and play action so it should be a pretty good fit."