Cubs

Thibodeau finishes second in Coach of Year voting

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Thibodeau finishes second in Coach of Year voting

Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich is the NBA's 2011-12 Coach of the Year, the league announced Tuesday. Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau finished second in the voting, receiving 27 first-place votes to Popovich's 77.

Thibodeau was considered an early frontrunner to win unprecedented back-to-back honors in his second season as an NBA head coach, but the team's relative April struggles and the Spurs' strong regular-season finish likely played a part in the decision-making of voters. The Bulls and Spurs finished tied for the league's best regular-season record at identical 50-16, but the Bulls earned home-court advantage throughout the playoffs by virtue of a head-to-head tiebreaker with the Spurs, as the Bulls won at San Antonio shortly after the All-Star break, in the two teams' lone matchup of the season.

Both teams won their playoff openers over the weekend, but Thibodeau's best player, reigning league MVP Derrick Rose, is now out for the remainder of the season after suffering a devastating torn ACL injury in his left knee late in Saturday's Game 1 win over the 76ers at the United Center. Popovich, who has won the award once before, in 2003, has won four NBA championships while coaching future Hall of Famer Tim Duncan and his strategy of rebuilding through young, unheralded players--Popovich also has an extensive say in the Spurs' personnel decisions -- as well as managing the minutes of veterans Duncan, All-Star point guard Tony Parker and sixth-man extraordinaire Manu Ginobili, while shifting to a more run-and-gun style compared to their previous half-court, defensive-oriented system has been widely lauded across the league.

Frank Vogel of the Bulls' Central Division rival Indiana finished third in the voting, winning seven first-place votes. Lionel Hollins of the Grizzlies and Thibodeau's former boss, Boston's Doc Rivers, were the only other two coaches to receive first-place votes.

Thibodeau frequently downplays individual honors, but it can be argued that without Rose for approximately half of the regular season, starting backcourt mate Rip Hamilton for the majority of the campaign and All-Star Luol Deng also missing significant time, the coaching job he did was even more impressive than last season, in which the Bulls also had the league's best regular-season record in Thibodeau's first shot at being an NBA head coach. While Thibodeau has faced criticism for leaving Rose in Saturday's game with the Bulls up by double figures and under two minutes to play, that didn't factor into the award, as voters had to submit their choices by last Friday, a day before the contest.

Summer of Sammy: Sosa's 10th, 11th homers in 1998

Summer of Sammy: Sosa's 10th, 11th homers in 1998

It's the 20th anniversary of the Summer of Sammy, when Sosa and Mark McGwire went toe-to-toe in one of the most exciting seasons in American sports history chasing after Roger Maris' home run record. All year, we're going to go homer-by-homer on Sosa's 66 longballs, with highlights and info about each. Enjoy.

Sosa is heating up, but even a red-hot Sosa doesn't automatically equal wins for the Cubs.

Slammin' Sammy notched his first multi-homer game in 1998 in a 9-5 loss to Kevin Millwood and the Atlanta Braves. Sosa drove in 4 of the Cubs' 5 runs on a solo shot in the 4th inning and a three-run shot in the 8th. 

Sosa tallied 830 feet of homers in the game, with his first blast going 410 feet and the second shot measured at 420 feet.

The big game bumped Sosa's overall season slash line to .337/.411/.551 (.962 OPS) with 11 homers and 35 RBI.

Fun fact: Mickey Morandini hit second for the Cubs in this game and went 4-for-4, but somehow only scored one run despite hitting just in front of Sosa all game. That's because Morandini was caught stealing to end the 3rd inning, leaving Sosa to lead off the 4th inning with a solo blast.

Steve Kerr told a Michael Jordan Bulls story to give advice to Kevin Durant

Steve Kerr told a Michael Jordan Bulls story to give advice to Kevin Durant

Anyone who lived through the Michael Jordan Bulls remembers those games when he was putting up tons of points, but the Bulls were still struggling overall.

Steve Kerr referenced one of those games to give advice to Kevin Durant during Game 5 of the Western Conference Finals. The TNT broadcast caught the conversation and aired it late in the third quarter.

"When MJ was with the Bulls, we had a playoff game," Kerr began the story. "He kept trying to score and he was scoring, but we weren't getting anything going. Phil Jackson said 'Who's open?' He said, 'John Paxson.'"

Paxson famously hit the game-winning shot in Game 6 of the 1993 NBA Finals to clinch the series. Kerr, who later hit his own championship-winning shot on an assist from Jordan in 1997, was trying to get to get his teammates involved.

"I want to trust your teammates early," Kerr said. "What you're doing is you're getting to the rim and then you're trying to hit him. I want you to trust the first guy and then move. Still attack, still look to score, but trust these guys, OK?"

Watch the video above to see the interaction.

Durant scored 29 points in Game 5 to lead the Warriors, but Houston took a 3-2 series lead with a 98-94 win.