White Sox

'Three Amigos' are IBCA Hall of Fame inductees

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'Three Amigos' are IBCA Hall of Fame inductees

The Illinois Basketball Coaches Association's Hall of Fame inductees for the class of 2013 will include former Simeon stars Ben Wilson and Nick Anderson, Dusty Bensko of Pleasant Plains, Michelle Hasheider of Okawville, Terri Zemaitis of Downers Grove South, Carver's Ken Maxey and Proviso East's famed Three Amigos--Donnie Boyce, Michael Finley and Sherell Ford.

Although the IBCA's Hall of Fame has been moved to Danville, the organization's annual Hall of Fame induction banquet will continue to be conducted at Braden Auditorium on Illinois State's campus in Normal. The 2013 event will be Saturday, April 27.

As a junior, Wilson led Simeon to the 1984 Class AA state championship. A few months later, he was acclaimed the No. 1 player in the nation after participating in the Nike camp. On the eve of Simeon's first game of the 1984-85 season, he was shot to death by a gang member outside his school.

Anderson was a two-time All-Chicago Area selection at Prosser, then decided to transfer to Simeon as a junior so he could play with Wilson. As a senior, he was named Illinois' Mr. Basketball and went on to outstanding careers at Illinois and the NBA.

Bensko was one of the best all-around athletes in state history. In an unprecedented achievement, he led Pleasant Plains to the Class A state titles in basketball and baseball as a junior in 2000. He was named to USA Today's All-America team. He scored 2,488 points in his basketball career.

Hasheider was Illinois' Ms. Basketball in 1994, was a two-time All-Stater, scored 2,026 points in her career and led Okawville to the Class A championship in 1994 and second place in 1993.

Zemaitis was a two-time All-Stater who led Downers Grove South to a 27-5 record and the Class AA quarterfinals in 1994. She also was one of the nation's leading volleyball players and later starred on Penn State's NCAA championship team.

Maxey was the backcourt leader of the Carver team that won the 1963 Class AA championship, beating Centralia in one of the most dramatic finishes in state tournament history. He went on to play with Carver legend Cazzie Russell at Michigan.

Boyce, Finley and Ford led Proviso East to the Class AA title in 1991. Ford was the Chicago area's Player of the Year and was a standout at Illinois-Chicago. Finley went on to outstanding careers at Wisconsin and the NBA. Boyce, who played at Colorado, currently is the head coach at Proviso East.

The annual Buzzy O'Connor Award for contributions to basketball will be presented to Jim Harrington, former coach at Weber and Elgin. Harrington was inducted into the IBCA Hall of Famein 2001. His son, Sean, a 1999 Elgin graduate and the school's all-time leading scorer, was inducted in 2011.

Here are other inductees in the class of 2013:

Players: Wilson; Anderson; Bensko; Hasheider; Zemaitis; Boyce; Finley; Ford; Ashley Berggren, Barrington; Justin Brock, Liberty; Greg Cruse, Goreville; Roland Duke, Dundee; Larry Gorman, Oak Forest; John Guderjan, Mid-County; Gary Jackson, Blue Mound; Sean Knox, North Greene; Kelly Miller, Lake Park; Ron Rigoni, Danville; Reggie Rose, Hubbard; Jordan Roth, Pleasant Plains; Daryl Schaffeld, Fremd; Ed Schumacher, Vocational; Corinne Vossel, Hersey; Shawn Watts, Thornton; Sarah Weiss, Libertyville.

Coaches: Bob Barnett, Hampshire; Jack Blickensderfer, Meridian; Sara Kinney, Chillicothe; Mike Miller, Rockton Hononegah; Scott Olson, Rock Falls.

Career Coaches: Scott Buzard, Glenview Springman; Dennis Cromer, Bensenville Fenton; Gary Harlacher, Geneseo; Mike Kiss, Geneseo; Greg Rigoni, Hickory Creek; Jerry Schmitt, Minonk Fieldcrest; Mike Schnable, Oswego; Ken Wildhaber, Highland; Matt Yarcho, Morton.

Teams: Glenbrook North boys 2005; Seneca boys, 2006; Carrollton girls, 2001; Carrollton girls, 2002; Buffalo Grove girls, 2000.

Officials: Terry Andrews, Bridgeport; Mark Cladis, Chicago Heights; David Collins, Bethalto; Julie Colwell, Lincolnwood; David Hancock, Orion; Dave Hasley, Abingdon; Dave King, St. Charles; Jim McKenna, Chicago.

Media: Scott Busboom, Decatur; Don Hamilton, Jacksonville; Tom Kelly, Encino, Calif.; Randy List, Centralia; Don Werntz, Freeport.

According to Chuck Rolinski, longtime executive directortreasurer of the IBCA and one of its co-founders, the Danville area Convention and Visitors Bureau is in charge of securing a permanent home for the IBCA's Hall of Fame.

Executive director Jeanne Cooke has made a decision to put the IBCA's Hall of Fame plaques and memorabilia in the Convention Center. It will have its own entrance with 4,000 square feet of space. An architect has been hired and remodeling of the space will begin in the near future.

If the Futures Game tells us anything, it's that the White Sox outfield of the future is ridiculously deep

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USA TODAY

If the Futures Game tells us anything, it's that the White Sox outfield of the future is ridiculously deep

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Just how deep is the White Sox outfield of the future?

The answer was embodied by the leadoff hitter in the Futures Game on Sunday afternoon in the nation’s capital.

Luis Alexander Basabe was one of two White Sox representatives in the prospect showcase held two days prior to baseball’s Midsummer Classic, along with pitcher Dylan Cease. And while Basabe was very deserving of the honor in the middle of a strong 2018 campaign — he blasted a two-run homer on a 102 mph pitch in the third inning — he’s not exactly the first name that comes to mind when running down the organization’s top prospects in the outfield.

MLB Pipeline ranks four outfielders — Eloy Jimenez, Luis Robert, Blake Rutherford and Micker Adolfo — ahead of Basabe on its list of White Sox prospects. And after Basabe come Ryan Cordell and Luis Gonzalez. And that’s before mentioning players outside the top 30 in the system, guys having big years like Joel Booker and Alex Call.

It makes for a lengthy list of possibilities to populate the outfield on the next contending White Sox squad.

“There’s a lot of players who have good ability, and that’s cool,” Basabe said Sunday. “I look at them, and I say, ‘They are good!’ And that makes me work more to be in the big leagues.”

That, of course, has been Rick Hahn’s goal all along during this rebuilding effort, to build as much depth throughout the farm system as possible.

That depth has been seemingly achieved among the organization’s starting-pitching corps, where Cease, Michael Kopech, Alec Hansen and Dane Dunning have joined current big leaguers Carlos Rodon, Lucas Giolito and Reynaldo Lopez as potential members of the rotation of the future.

The outfield, though, is equally loaded.

That depth is obvious with Basabe’s selection to the Futures Game. The White Sox are showing they deserve the title of one of baseball’s best farm systems when their No. 13 prospect is capable of reaching the game’s premier prospect event.

Of course, the other benefit of depth is tied to Basabe’s selection: It’s a heck of a safety net for the inevitable injuries that come with being a professional baseball player. Jimenez, Robert and Adolfo are all currently dealing with injuries of varying significance, with Adolfo out for the next eight to 10 months after having Tommy John surgery and Robert out for the second long stretch this season with a thumb injury.

No one is suggesting that these specific injuries will derail the careers of any of those three big talents. But being able to point to other young outfielders as backup plans is a key for any organization, especially one so focused on the future like the White Sox. Prospects succumbing to injuries or simply not reaching expectations is a reality of the game. But if such things should occur, the White Sox, at least, have quite the Plan Bs in the likes of Basabe, Rutherford, Gonzalez and more.

Take a look at the numbers the White Sox outfield prospects have put up this season.

— Jimenez: .313/.371/.541 with 12 homers and 46 RBIs in 65 with with Double-A Birmingham and Triple-A Charlotte

— Robert: .293/.372/.373 with five extra-base hits and nine RBNIs in 21 games with Class A Kannapolis and Class A Winston-Salem

— Adolfo: .283/.368/.466 with 11 homers and 50 RBIs in 78 games with Class A Winston-Salem

— Rutherford: .305/.348/.468 with 30 extra-base hits and 60 RBIs in 75 games for Class A Winston-Salem

— Basabe: .256/.356/.447 with 10 homers and 37 RBIs in 80 games with Class A Winston-Salem and Double-A Birmingham

— Gonzalez: .300/.352/.478 with nine homers, 26 doubles and 38 RBIsin 75 games with Class A Kannapolis and Class A Winston-Salem

— Booker: .285/.364/.440 with seven homers, 55 runs scored and 27 RBIs in 74 games with Class A Winston-Salem and Double-A Birmingham

— Call: .251/.359/.407 with seven homers and 36 RBIs in 77 games with Class A Winston-Salem and Double-A Birmingham

That’s all very, very good news for the White Sox.

Back in spring training, Jimenez, Robert and Adolfo talked about their desire to arrive on the South Side at about the same time and make up the team’s outfield one day. Well, there’s a good chance that the three outfielders on the next contending White Sox team will come from the above list of names.

“There’s a lot of competition,” Basabe said. “We’re here, this is what it’s about. We’ve got to compete.”

Former Blackhawks goalie Ray Emery dies in early morning drowning

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AP

Former Blackhawks goalie Ray Emery dies in early morning drowning

Former Blackhawks goaltender Ray Emery was identified as the victim in an early morning drowning on Sunday at the Hamilton Harbour, Hamilton Police confirmed. He was 35.

According to the Hamilton Spectator, Emery and his friends jumped in the water around 6:30 a.m., but Emery never resurfaced. His body was recovered later in the afternoon.

Emery played in the NHL for 10 seasons, two of which came with the Blackhawks from 2011-13, where he served as a backup goaltender to Corey Crawford.

In 2013, he teammated up with Crawford to win the William M. Jennings Trophy, awarded to the goaltender(s) with the fewest goals against in a single season, before going on to capture his first Stanley Cup. During that season, Emery went 17-1-0 with a 1.94 goals against average, .922 save percentage and three shutouts.

The hockey community took to Twitter to offer their condolences when news began to spread: