Bears

An update on Adrian Peterson's condition

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An update on Adrian Peterson's condition

From Comcast SportsNet
MANKATO, Minn. (AP) -- The Minnesota Vikings are aiming to put Adrian Peterson in for some exhibition game carries before they clear him for the regular-season opener. In order to get to that point, the star running back will have to start practicing. That could come next week. The coaching and medical staffs will evaluate Peterson's left knee after the Vikings return from San Francisco, the site of their first preseason game Friday night. "I'm looking forward to being out here pretty soon. I've been out for like two weeks, and it's time to get going," said Peterson, who tore the anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments last December. "I know that they understand that, and they've been watching and they've been getting good feedback. So I'm sure they are pretty much as excited as I am." Coach Leslie Frazier said Peterson's pushing to join the team for practice has been "never ending," but Peterson said Wednesday he's let up on his lobbying. "Everything I'm hearing is extremely positive so we'll see where we are," Frazier said. The date that matters most is Sept. 9, when the Vikings (No. 29 in the AP Pro32) play Jacksonville to start the season. Frazier said again there's no indication Peterson won't be able to take part in that game. "Everything he's done he's right on point, but I say that without him ever participating in a drill with his teammates," Frazier said, declining to commit to a certain number of practices Peterson will need before he's allowed to play in the preseason. The Vikings don't want his first big blow from a defender to come in a game that counts. They'd rather him get that out of the way in August. Peterson said he thinks that would help him. "I'm ready to get hit. It might sound strange, but just to get that feel," Peterson said, pointing to his patellar tendon area in particular. That still "feels funny" as part of the recovery from the injury. So whenever he returns to the backfield, he'll continue to apply his "don't waste today" mindset toward the rehabilitation work, knowing it will all pay off once he's able to start taking those handoffsl again. "Anytime they give me the ball, I'll be ready to tote the load," Peterson said. Peterson also said he won't have to return to Houston for court, where he has a resisting arrest charge against him from a closing-time incident at a nightclub there last month. Hearings are scheduled for Sept. 27 and Nov. 15, but his attorney will represent him. "I feel like we're in a good position right now. The most important thing is no more interruptions. So it won't interfere with what's going on with the Minnesota Vikings, my team, so we'll just see how things play out," Peterson said.

Why Mitch Trubisky's biggest weakness won't preclude him from success in 2018

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USA Today Sports Images

Why Mitch Trubisky's biggest weakness won't preclude him from success in 2018

As the Bears set their foundation for training camp during OTAs this month, one part of that is beginning to identify each player’s strengths and weaknesses on which to build in Bourbonnais. 

Designing an offense to Mitch Trubisky’s strengths was one of the reasons why Ryan Pace hired Matt Nagy, who then hired Mark Helfrich to be his offensive coordinator. Easy is the wrong word — but it wouldn’t have made sense for the Bears to not build an offense around their second-picked quarterback. 

But as Nagy and Helfrich are installing that offense during OTAs and, next month, veteran minicamp, they’re also learning what Trubisky’s weaknesses are. And the one Helfrich pointed to, in a way, is a positive. 

“Experience,” Helfrich said. “I think it’s 100 percent experience and just reps, and that’s kind of what I was talking about was knowing why something happened. As a quarterback, he might take the perfect drop and be looking at the right guy in your progression, and that guy runs the wrong route or the left guard busts or something. The defense does something different or wrong, even. And trusting that is just a matter of putting rep on top of rep on top of rep and being confident.”

It'd be a concern if the Bears thought Trubisky lacked the necessary talent to be great, or had a lacking work ethic or bad attitude. Experience isn't something he can control, in a way. 

This isn’t anything new for Trubisky. His lack of experience at North Carolina — he only started 13 games there — was the biggest ding to his draft stock a year ago; while he started a dozen games for the Bears in 2017, the offense was simple and conservative, designed to minimize risk for Trubisky (and, to be fair, a sub-optimal group of weapons around him). 

But even if Trubisky started all 16 games in an innovative, aggressive offense last year, he’d still be experiencing plenty of things for the first time. Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger made this point back in September that still resonates now with regard to Trubisky:

“I think it takes a few years until you can really get that title of understanding being great or even good, because you see so many looks,” Roethlisberger said. “In Year 2 and 3, you’re still seeing looks and can act like a rookie.”

So the challenge for Nagy and Helfrich is to build an offense that accentuates Trubisky’s strengths while managing his lack of experience. For what it’s worth, the Los Angeles Rams and Philadelphia Eagles succeeded in those efforts last year with Jared Goff and Carson Wentz, respectively. 

For Helfrich, though, one of Trubisky’s strengths — his leadership qualities — are already helping mitigate his need for more experience. 

“He’s still in the mode of learning and doing things out here,” Helfrich said. “We might have run one play 10 times against 10 different defenses, you know? And so his response to every one of those 10 things is brand new. And so, you see his reaction to some of those is good. Some of those things you want to improve upon and then keep your chest up and lead because we need that.”
 

Charlie Tilson plays in Detroit for first time since getting injured in his MLB debut

Charlie Tilson plays in Detroit for first time since getting injured in his MLB debut

For over two years, Charlie Tilson was starting to look like his own version of "Moonlight" Graham, the player made famous in the movie "Field of Dreams" because he played in one major league game and never got to bat.

The White Sox traded for Tilson just before the trade deadline passed in 2016. Two days later he made his big league debut with the White Sox in Detroit. He got a single in his first at-bat, but left the game with an injury and missed the rest of the season. Tilson also missed all of the 2017 season and his MLB future was starting to come into question.

Back healthy, Tilson started this season in Triple-A Charlotte and hit .248 in 39 games when he got called up to replace Leury Garcia, who was placed on the disabled list. On Thursday, Tilson returned to a big league field for the first time in more than 20 months. He went 0-for-3 in a loss to Baltimore.

Friday marked a return to the site of Tilson's big league debut and the injury that made it such a brief stint. Tilson has now played three big league games, over the course of nearly 21 months, and two of them have been in Detroit.

Tilson went 1-for-4, meaning both his hits are in Comerica Park. The White Sox lost 5-4 after giving up three runs in the bottom of the eighth.