White Sox

Veteran MLB player sitting out due to anxiety

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Veteran MLB player sitting out due to anxiety

From Comcast SportsNetCINCINNATI (AP) -- The San Francisco Giants put Aubrey Huff on the 15-day disabled list Wednesday while he received treatment for an anxiety attack.Huff left the team in New York over the weekend after struggling at the plate and in the field. The Giants originally said he had a family emergency.Manager Bruce Bochy said on Wednesday that Huff is getting treatment for anxiety. He could rejoin the team in San Francisco over the weekend."He had an episode of anxiety," Bochy said, before a game against the Cincinnati Reds. "He got some treatment, he'll continue to get treatment. At this time, we thought the best thing was to make this move and put him on the 15-day disabled list."The Giants called up infielder Joaquin Arias from Triple-A Fresno. He was in Cincinnati in time for the second game of a series against the Reds.Huff has started four games in left field and six at first base. Huff was moved to second base for the first time in his career on Saturday because the Giants were short-handed, and he failed to cover the base on a potential double play, helping the Mets rally for a 5-4 win.Huff also has struggled at the plate, going 1 for 15 in his last six games.Bochy didn't know whether Huff has dealt with anxiety issues before now. When he left the team after Saturday's game, Bochy initially thought he might be experiencing a problem related to his on-field performance."I thought that was a possibility, yeah I did," Bochy said. "I didn't have a chance to talk to him, but we did pass some texts."

The White Sox connection to Cy Young winner Jacob deGrom that once and for all proves pitcher wins are meaningless

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USA TODAY

The White Sox connection to Cy Young winner Jacob deGrom that once and for all proves pitcher wins are meaningless

Jacob deGrom was excellent for the New York Mets in 2018, and his sensational campaign was rewarded Wednesday with the NL Cy Young Award.

The Mets' ace led baseball with a 1.70 ERA and struck out 269 batters in 217 innings. The other end of that spectrum was Lucas Giolito, who in his first full season in the big leagues had the highest ERA in baseball (among qualified pitchers) at 6.13. He struck out 125 guys in 173.1 innings.

It would seem to be two dramatically different seasons, but in one area the two were very much the same. Just look at this factoid dug up by ESPN's Sarah Langs:

That's right, the White Sox were just as good in Giolito's starts as the Mets were in deGrom's starts, and the two pitchers finished with an identical number of victories on the season.

So if there was still any doubt that the pitcher win has become a meaningless stat, this ought to erase it.

That's not to come down on Giolito, who said he learned an awful lot from his struggles during the White Sox rebuilding season, lessons the team expects will benefit him down the road in seasons when the White Sox are contending for championships. Instead, it's to point out that the pitcher win, which has long since fell out of favor as a stat used to analyze how good someone is, is officially dead. After all, deGrom ranked 47th in wins and still managed to be arguably the game's best pitcher last season.

Obviously deGrom had no control over what the rest of his Mets teammates did in games he started. He allowed an average of fewer than two runs every time he took the mound. The Mets averaged fewer than three and a half runs in games deGrom started, more than half a run fewer than they averaged over the course of the 162-game season.

White Sox fans familiar with the Jose Quintana Era can relate.

Again, Giolito is expected to improve with experience as his career goes on. And it's important to remember that 2018 was never supposed to be about what his numbers looked like at the end but what they'll look like in the future.

Another lesson to take from 2018, though? The pitcher win is deader than disco.

White Sox say Zack Burdi is fine and could force his way to majors in 2019

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AP

White Sox say Zack Burdi is fine and could force his way to majors in 2019

Zack Burdi’s shutdown in the Arizona Fall League is no cause for concern, at least not to Rick Hahn.

Burdi, who the White Sox took in the first round of the 2016 draft, has been recovering from Tommy John for more than a year. He didn’t pitch in any minor league games during the 2018 season, and he was just taken out of action in the AFL after a handful of appearances.

While that might have raised a few eyebrows, the White Sox general manager said there’s nothing to worry about when it comes to Burdi, who many fans consider the top internal candidate to be the White Sox closer of the future.

“He is doing well, and it is too early to be concerned about Zack Burdi,” Hahn said last week at the GM Meetings in Southern California. “It's important to get back throwing regularly. He had a very long rehab process, as you can imagine, which ended with going out on a regular basis in the Arizona Fall League. He cleared every hurdle we had for him at the end.

“He expressed to us a level of fatigue as far as his overall body being worn out from the time of his throwing program to instructs, to the Fall League, we felt it made sense to just shut him down instead of just running him out there for the last two weeks of Fall League.

“We are pleased with where he's at right now. We had always said that the target for him would be to be essentially back without restriction in 2019. That continues to be the case.”

That’s got to be pleasant news for White Sox fans who might have worried that the shutdown was an indicator of some sort of setback in Burdi’s recovery.

What should be even more pleasant news is that Burdi might make his way to the South Side in 2019. He reached Triple-A Charlotte prior to requiring Tommy John surgery in 2017, logging 33.1 innings there with a 4.05 ERA.

The White Sox bullpen is loaded with youth after a flurry of late-season call-ups in 2018, but perhaps there’s room for one more, eventually, the organization's No. 17 prospect.

“Keep in mind that he's still very young,” Hahn said. “He still has relatively few minor league innings under his belt. I can certainly see him forcing his way into our picture in 2019. When, whether it's early, middle or late, I don't know. Let's see where he's at once he's back throwing in games regularly for us. We still very much believe in his future and are pleased with where he's at in terms of his rehab.”