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Top 20 MLB Draft prospects: Who will White Sox pick at No. 11?

Top 20 MLB Draft prospects: Who will White Sox pick at No. 11?

As things get better, the draft pick gets worse.

That’s the trajectory of a successful rebuild: utilizing high draft picks, which come from losing a lot of games, to win a bunch of games and stop picking at the top of the draft. The White Sox used the Nos. 4 and 3 picks in the last two drafts to take two players, Nick Madrigal and Andrew Vaughn, who they hope will be franchise cornerstones.

While the 89 losses from 2019 are nothing to crow about, the White Sox won’t be picking so high when the 2020 draft takes place next month. They own the No. 11 pick, and they aren’t expected to land “the best all-around player in college baseball” this time around.

This year’s draft is going to look a lot different than normal, with only five rounds as owners look to cut costs. Revenues are expected to dip dramatically with the 2020 season impacted by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and eliminating the many millions handed out to draft picks as signing bonuses is one move amid the financial maneuvering. But nonetheless, when the first round is all said and done June 10, the White Sox will walk away with a talented player to add to their bright future.

Who will they take? Baseball teams don’t draft for need like NFL and NBA teams do, so looking at the big league roster and even the minor league system, as a whole, offers little in the way of clues to even what position the White Sox will spend their top pick on.

So here’s a look at the top 20 prospects in the draft, as rated by the folks over at MLB Pipeline. One of them could be the next hyped White Sox prospect.

1. Spencer Torkelson, 1B, Arizona State University

Another power-hitting Pac-12 first baseman, Torkelson is getting compared to Vaughn. He hit a combined 48 homers during his freshman and sophomore seasons and walked 31 times in just 17 games before his junior season was halted by the coronavirus. The White Sox likely won’t have the opportunity to draft him, though, and could instead soon see him as a division rival. MLB Pipeline’s Jonathan Mayo has Torkelson going No. 1 overall to the Tigers in his mock draft.

2. Austin Martin, OF/3B, Vanderbilt University

Described by MLB Pipeline as “the best pure hitter in the draft,” Martin has plenty of versatility. He played third base, center field and a few other positions at Vandy. But the bat’s the thing. He posted a .410 batting average and a .503 on-base percentage in 59 games during the 2019 season. Mayo’s got Martin going No. 2 to the Orioles, who took college baseball’s best player, Adley Rutschman, with the No. 1 pick a year ago.

3. Asa Lacy, LHP, Texas A&M University

A hard-throwing lefty, Lacy dominated during his sophomore season, with a 2.13 ERA in 15 starts. He struck out 130 opposing batters in 88.2 innings. And he was on his way toward following that up this year, too, having allowed just two runs in his first four starts of the season. Mayo has Lacy going to the Marlins with the No. 3 pick.

4. Emerson Hancock, RHP, University of Georgia

In his first 10 starts last season, Hancock allowed just eight runs. A lat injury knocked him out for two weeks, but his numbers still looked mighty good at season’s end: a 1.99 ERA with just 20 earned runs allowed in 14 starts. He struck out 97 and walked only 18. Mayo’s projection has Hancock going to the Mariners with the No. 6 pick.

5. Nick Gonzales, SS/2B, New Mexico State University

The MVP of last summer’s wood-bat Cape Cod League, Gonzales can hit. He put up insane numbers as a sophomore, with a .432 batting average, a .532 on-base percentage and a bonkers 1.305 OPS. In the small sample size that was the 16 games he got to play as a junior, he was even more ridiculous, getting on base at a .610 clip and homering 12 times in 16 games to contribute to a mind-scrambling 1.765 OPS. The White Sox might not want to hold out hope of landing him and should instead be fearful of where he ends up: Mayo’s got him going to the division-rival Royals at No. 4.

RELATED: 2020 MLB Draft to be held remotely, like NFL Draft before it

6. Garrett Mitchell, OF, University of California-Los Angeles

He’s big, he’s strong, he’s fast, he plays center field. Sounds like the kind of guy a lot of big league clubs would want to mold into a star. Mitchell had 12 triples, 41 RBIs and 18 stolen bases in 62 games as a sophomore last year for the Bruins and a .984 OPS that will make anyone pay attention. But he didn’t hit that many homers, and that’s why Mayo has him all the way down at No. 17 in his mock draft.

7. Zac Veen, OF, Spruce Creek High School (Florida)

Rated as the best high school hitter in the draft, Veen is a lefty who MLB Pipeline said has “reminded some of Cody Bellinger offensively.” That sounds good. They say he might not stick in center field, but he’s got enough talent to rank as the lone high schooler in the site’s top 10 list. Mayo’s got him as the fifth player off the board, going to the Blue Jays.

8. Reid Detmers, LHP, University of Louisville

An Illinois native, from Chatham, south of Springfield, MLB Pipeline calls Detmers “the most polished left-hander available.” A strong sophomore season helped the Cardinals reach the College World Series last year. He logged a 2.85 ERA in 17 starts, with 162 strikeouts compared to just 27 walks. Before this season came to a sudden end, he struck out 48 batters in only 22 innings. In his mock draft, Mayo has Detmers heading to the Pirates with the No. 7 pick.

9. Max Meyer, RHP, University of Minnesota

The Twins drafted this Land of 10,000 Lakes product back in 2017. But he didn’t sign, and after winning 100 games last season, they likely won’t get a crack at Meyer this time around. He was moved from the bullpen to the rotation in the middle of last season, and in 16 appearances overall, he posted a 2.11 ERA. He was doing more of the same this year, with a 1.95 ERA in four starts. MLB Pipeline says he’s got the best slider in the draft, so he might not slide very far down the board. Mayo’s got him going to the Padres at No. 8.

10. Heston Kjerstad, OF, University of Arkansas

MLB Pipeline says Kjerstad, who reached the College World Series in each of his first two college seasons, is second only to the top-ranked prospect, Torkelson, when it comes to power. He might not be the fastest, but he can mash, with 30 home runs and 108 RBIs in 132 career college games. He was off to the races this season, with a 1.304 OPS in 16 games. If Mayo’s mock hits, Kjerstad could see those college power numbers become big league reality, forecasted to go to the Rockies at No. 9.

11. Mick Abel, RHP, Jesuit High School (Oregon)

Welcome to White Sox territory. The South Siders own the No. 11 pick, and while one or more of the top 10 prospects could still be around when they go on the clock, they’re guaranteed at least one of the players ranked in the top 11, a number that gets bigger the further down the list we go. Would they take a high school pitcher? Maybe. They did it in both the second and third rounds last year, and now Matthew Thompson and Andrew Dalquist rank in the top 12 prospects in the organization. The highest ranked high school pitcher in the draft, Abel was the Gatorade Player of the Year in the Beaver State after winning the state title there. Mayo has him going to the Giants at No. 13.

12. Jared Kelley, RHP, Refugio High School (Texas)

The top-ranked high school pitcher when the year started, Kelley is said to be the Lone Star State’s finest high school arm in a decade. The kid can chuck, and MLB Pipeline says he “has the look of a frontline starter who could reach the big leagues before he turns 21.” OK then. Mayo has him falling to the Mets at No. 19.

13. Austin Hendrick, OF, West Allegheny High School (Pennsylvania)

With plenty of left-handed power, Hendrick could one day be a heavy-hitting right fielder in the majors. MLB Pipeline says “there isn't a high school hitter in the country with more upside.” Strikeouts are mentioned as a concern, but as long as he keeps hitting balls into the seats — or if Mayo’s mock comes true, onto Sheffield Avenue — teams will keep wanting him. Mayo has him going to the Cubs at No. 16.

14. Nick Bitsko, RHP, Central Bucks East High School (Pennsylvania)

An early high school graduate, when Bitsko’s drafted next month, it will come a few days before his 18th birthday. It could be a very nice birthday present for the 6-foot-4 17-year-old, who got a rave review from MLB Pipeline for his command. But Mayo doesn’t even have him going in the first round of his mock draft, perhaps a reflection of Bitsko’s commitment to the University of Virginia.

15. Ed Howard, SS, Mount Carmel High School (Illinois)

A Chicago native and member of the Jackie Robinson West team that finished runner up in the Little League World Series in 2014, Howard is an alum of the White Sox ACE (Amateur City Elite) program. And there are plenty of fans who would love to see the hometown team take a local kid at No. 11 in the draft. MLB Pipeline describes him as a “smooth defender” with quick hands and a strong arm who makes “repeated strong contact” to go along with good speed and a high baseball IQ. He’s now the Land of Lincoln’s Gatorade Player of the Year, too.


But will the White Sox grab him if he’s there at No. 11? Mayo has Howard sliding all the way to No. 27 — where the division-rival Twins, who employed homestater Joe Mauer for quite some time, could provide a reminder for the White Sox on why not to pass on the kids from your own backyard.

RELATED: How the 2020 White Sox were drafted: Where, when and by which teams

16. Robert Hassell, OF, Independence High School (Tennessee)

Described as “the best pure hitter in the 2020 prep class,” the left-handed hitting Hassell starred for Team USA last September. He’s also a bit of a two-way star, with MLB Pipeline calling him “a legitimate prospect as a pitcher, as well,” though a much better one as a hitter. He’s committed to reigning College World Series champion Vanderbilt University, but Mayo has him mocked as a top-10 pick, going to the Angels at No. 10.

17. Patrick Bailey, C, North Carolina State University

Mayo has the White Sox selecting Bailey with the No. 11 pick, which would make Bailey the second catcher they’ve drafted with a top-11 draft choice in the last five years. They took Zack Collins out of the University of Miami with the No. 10 pick in 2016. Bailey is expected to be the first catcher off the board, and his offensive numbers from college are pretty excellent: a career .322/.429/.602 slash line in 84 games with the Wolfpack. His 13 homers as a freshman two years ago set a school record. But unlike Collins, who received rave reviews for his bat coming out of college, Bailey’s strength is his defense, with MLB Pipeline saying “he's more athletic and moves better than most catchers.” Again, baseball teams aren’t often thinking about a big league need when making a draft selection, so if this is how things play out, don’t worry that the White Sox just signed Yasmani Grandal to a four-year contract.

18. Garrett Crochet, LHP, University of Tennessee

Towering at 6-foot-6, Crochet can whip it, with his fastball reaching triple digits last fall. Striking out 81 batters in 65 innings, he pitched the Volunteers to the program’s first-ever win in the NCAA tournament last year but raised some red flags this year, limited with shoulder soreness. Mayo has him going to the Rangers at No. 14.

19. Tyler Soderstrom, C, Turlock High School (California)

The backup catcher on his own high school team, Soderstrom is described as a better hitter than he is a defender. But he’s good enough with the bat — “polished” is the word MLB Pipeline used to describe the left-handed hitter — to rank pretty high among the draft’s best prospects. Mayo has him going to the Phillies at No. 15.

20. Pete Crow-Armstrong, OF, Harvard-Westlake High School (California)

If the name of that high school sounds familiar, it’s Lucas Giolito’s alma mater. And it’s becoming a bit of a baseball factory. Giolito was on the same team as Cardinals pitcher Jack Flaherty and Braves pitcher Max Fried. Crow-Armstrong is set to be the fifth player drafted out of Harvard-Westlake in the last nine years. How high will he go? Strikeouts and power are listed as potential concerns, but he’s fast and MLB Pipeline says he “might be the best defensive outfielder in the class.” Mayo’s got him going to the Diamondbacks at No. 18.

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White Sox pitchers' greatest hitting performances before universal DH

White Sox pitchers' greatest hitting performances before universal DH

The universal designated hitter is coming in 2020. Of course, the White Sox have had the DH since 1973, but when interleague play was introduced in 1997, there were still a handful of games where the pitchers hit. Now we won’t have even that.

And that’s fine. White Sox pitchers from 1997-present have hit a collective .104/.137/.144 with three home runs, 17 walks and 205 strikeouts in 516 plate appearances. That’s hard to watch. But there have been some fine moments by White Sox pitchers at the plate throughout history.

On April 29, 1901, Frank Shugart hit the first major league home run in White Sox history. He was a shortstop, but the second home run was by pitcher John Skopec the following day. So, believe it or not, there was a time where the White Sox had an equal number of home runs by position players and pitchers. One apiece — after the game on April 30, 1901.

In 1908, Big Ed Walsh had a season for the ages. He went 40-15 while tossing 464 innings, striking out 269 (a White Sox record until Chris Sale broke it) with 42 complete games and 11 shutouts. He even made 17 relief appearances; what more could you ask for?

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Well, on July 4, he hit a home run — one of only three home runs the Sox hit ALL SEASON! Walsh’s round tripper was the team’s first of the season — in Game 68. So, Ed Walsh won 40 games and hit 33.3 percent of the team’s home runs in 1908. That won’t happen again.

On Aug. 31, 1935, the White Sox beat the Indians 5-0. Three of those runs were on a bases-loaded triple by Vern Kennedy in the sixth inning. Of course, that wasn’t the big story. The big story of the game was that Kennedy tossed a no-hitter.

Tommy Byrne had notorious control issues, but he had talent, so the White Sox traded for the 33-year old lefty for 1953 trying to catch lightning in a bottle. The White Sox ended up trading Byrne to Washington in June, but not before he put up one of the stranger statlines in franchise history. Byrne made six starts but only pitched 16 innings. In four of his starts, he failed to make it out of the second inning. He walked 26 in 16 innings and struck out only four. His ERA was a nightmarish 10.13 but he was 2-0!

But that’s not it. He made twice as many appearances as a pinch hitter (12) than he did on the mound (6). And on May 16, 1953 at Yankee Stadium, he dug in to pinch hit in the ninth inning against Ewell “The Whip” Blackwell with the bases loaded and the White Sox trailing 3-1. You probably know where this is going. Yes, Byrne hit the most improbable pinch hit grand slam, one of only eleven in White Sox history, and the only one by a pitcher.

Jack Harshman holds the White Sox record with 16 strikeouts on July 25, 1954, which you may already know. What you may not know is that Harshman was the New York Giants Opening Day starter in 1950 — at first base. With 12 home runs for the White Sox, he’s one of only two pitchers in franchise history with at least 10. And on June 16, 1957, Harshman started against the Washington Senators and was knocked out of the box after allowing six runs in 4 1/3 innings.

Harshman didn't hit a home run but was relieved by Dixie Howell, who hit two of them. It’s the only multi-homer effort by a White Sox pitcher — and it was a reliever. Howell had one other home run in 1957, and it was a walkoff — the only White Sox walk-off homer by a pitcher (excluding pinch hit appearances) — on Sept. 6. The year before, Howell homered in consecutive relief appearances for the White Sox — June 27 vs. Boston and July 1 at Cleveland. Not bad.

Nellie Fox, Luis Aparicio and Early Wynn finished 1-2-3 in AL MVP voting in 1959, as the Go-Go Sox went on to the World Series. Fox won the MVP, hitting two home runs and posting a .389 slugging percentage. Meanwhile,  Wynn was third in MVP voting, won the Cy Young Award, matched Fox’s two home runs and .389 slugging percentage.

MORE: Tim Anderson leads growing White Sox toward contention: 'He's a man'

His masterpiece was on May 1, when he tossed a complete game, one-hit shutout with 14 strikeouts. But he also homered for the lone run in the 1-0 victory! And that June 14, he went 4-for-5 with three runs, two doubles and an RBI in Game 1 of a doubleheader at Baltimore. It remains the last four-hit game by a White Sox starting pitcher (Adam LaRoche had four hits in a game where he pitched the ninth inning. It doesn’t really count, but it’s fun to mention).

There have been four pinch hit home runs by White Sox pitchers — Byrne’s grand slam (mentioned earlier), Charlie Barnabe on May 1, 1928, and two by Gary Peters. Peters hit a remarkable 15 home runs for the White Sox, a record 13 as a pitcher and two as a pinch hitter. One of those two was a walk-off blast on July 19, 1964 in the first game of a doubleheader against the Kansas City A’s. Peters also hit one of two grand slams by a White Sox pitcher — three, if you count Byrne’s pinch hit blast. Peters hit his grand salami on Cinco de Mayo in 1968 off the Yankees’ Al Downing.

The other grand slam by a Sox moundsman was by Monty Stratton on June 10, 1938. Tragically, later that year Stratton suffered an accidental gunshot wound which required his leg to be amputated. Monty never made it back to the majors, but made it back to the minors in 1946 and pitched for several more years on a prosthetic. The 1949 movie "The Stratton Story" tells his inspirational tale.

The best single-season batting average in White Sox history (minimum 15 at-bats) is .526 by Terry Forster, a pitcher. Years before David Letterman referred to the big lefty as a “Fat Tub of Goo,” he went 10-for-19 for the White Sox in 1972 — 10 hits and 29 saves in the same season And then of course, the following season, the American League adopted the designated hitter.

What about those three home runs hit by White Sox pitchers in the DH era?

The first was by Jon Garland in Cincinnati on June 18, 2006 off Esteban Yan, who allowed two of the more unlikely home runs in White Sox history. It was Yan who allowed Paul Konerko’s epic inside-the-park homer at Tropicana Field on April 11, 2000.

Next was Mark Buehrle, who homered off Milwaukee’s Braden Looper on June 14, 2009. Of course, Buehrle later tossed a perfect game on July 23 that year. Buehrle in 2009 became the second pitcher in White Sox history to homer and toss a no-hitter in the same season, along with Frank “Piano Mover” Smith in 1905. Smith had two hits, three runs and a walk in his Sept. 6, 1905 no-no.

The most recent home run by a White Sox pitcher was Anthony Ranaudo on July 27, 2016. It was Ranaudo’s first game in a White Sox uniform; he is one of only two pitchers to homer in their White Sox debut, joining Jack Salveson on June 14, 1935. The 6-foot-7 righty is also one of only two AL pitchers ever to homer at Wrigley Field, joining the Tigers’ Daniel Norris on Aug. 19, 2015. Ranaudo was the first White Sox starting pitcher to homer before allowing a hit in a game since Peters on July 14, 1965.

But of course, Ranaudo’s blast was not the greatest moment by a White Sox pitcher in 2016. That of course would be on June 1 at Citi Field in Queens, when Matt Albers doubled to lead off the 13th inning, scored what would be the game-winning run and got the win over the Mets. The moment was immortalized with its own Topps Now card.

If you take 119 years of history, you’re bound to find a few rays of sunshine. Such is the case with White Sox pitchers at the plate. Fortunately, the designated hitter has allowed generations of White Sox fans to enjoy the fine hitting of Harold Baines, Frank Thomas and Jim Thome, just to name a few. So, if Major League Baseball wants to implement a universal DH, that’s fine by us.

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Tim Anderson leads growing White Sox toward contention: 'He's a man'

Tim Anderson leads growing White Sox toward contention: 'He's a man'

Growing up.

It's what this rebuild is all about.

When you start building from the bottom, the name of the game is acquiring young, talented players, developing them and watching as they, hopefully, start winning baseball games and, eventually, World Series titles. The White Sox, despite the hype, obviously aren't all the way there just yet, unless I somehow missed a parade.

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But they're getting there. They might be really close. And throughout the roster, players once described as prospects with bright futures have stepped into those futures.

That includes Tim Anderson, who went from a .240 hitter in 2018 to a .335 hitter last year, that batting average high enough to win the big league batting title.

What's next for Anderson remains to be seen — the White Sox and their fans want to see defensive improvement to go along with his big jump at the plate — but the guy running the show is over the moon when it comes to his shortstop and the growing up Anderson's done over the last few years.

"I was watching him a little while ago. Man, he looks so good," White Sox manager Rick Renteria said Friday. "This young man is — he's a man. I think that he's grown so much as a person, as a player. I'm looking forward to seeing what's next for him. I'm very, very confident in the maturity that's transpired over the last few years. He's worked extremely hard. I think, and I still believe, that this kid's an All-Star quality type shortstop.

"When I see him working, I see some things that he does, and every day I'm impressed. I expect a lot out of Timmy. More importantly, Timmy expects a lot out of himself. I know he wants perfection, and he's continuing to grow toward that. But this kid's pretty good, and I will continue to say that for as long as I'm here.

"Timmy's a pretty good Major League Baseball player, and I think he's going to be around for a while."

Anderson sees that growth, too, when he looks around the field, and like plenty of fans and observers, he sees this group of White Sox capable of finally making that jump out of rebuilding mode and into contending mode this year.

"I think we all have matured," he said. "As the years pass by, we have all matured and kind of grown into better players. We all had a great season last year. I think it’s just exciting to see us continue to grow and continue to come together as a team and grow as men.

"I think it’s very cool and we have a chance to basically tighten this bond up for the next couple of years to hopefully do something that’s real special."

That jump was supposed to happen this season. With the young core emerging in a big way in 2019 and Rick Hahn's front office going to work over the offseason, bringing in veterans with winning experience, the rebuild was supposed to start bearing winning fruit back in March.

Then the pandemic brought baseball to a screeching halt.

RELATED: White Sox in playoffs? Tim Anderson: 'Something dope can happen in 60 games'

The game is back, for now at least, with the league-branded "Summer Camp" starting Friday morning on the South Side. Finally, the White Sox were back together, again readying for a season of big expectations.

A lot has changed since March, though, both in baseball and in the world, in general. For the White Sox, the 162-game season they were built for and revved up for in March has been squeezed down to a 60-game schedule in a two-month sprint to the postseason.

The next stage of growth for these White Sox — whose most recent regular-season action was the end of an 89-loss season almost 10 months ago — is learning how to win. They thought they'd have six months to figure it out. Instead, they have two.

"'Learning how to win,' I guess that's a really good way of putting it," Renteria said. "Our guys, they've been growing up together. I've been very fortunate to be here to see them growing up, and they've had an opportunity over the last few years now to experience playing at the major league level, going through some ups and downs, learning what they're capable of doing.

"At the end of the day, their talent has to meet the moment and be prepared for it and allow themselves to trust what they're capable of doing."

Should the state of the pandemic allow the 2020 season to get off the ground — the initial testing results Major League Baseball announced Friday were encouraging, with a positive-test rate of only 1.2 percent — we'll find out exactly what they're capable of doing.

But as mentioned, that growth is still happening all over the roster. Anderson, entering his fifth big league season, has grown up. Even Lucas Giolito and Yoan Moncada have shed the nasty results from their 2018 seasons to arrive at a much better place. But Dylan Cease and Michael Kopech only have a handful of major league starts under their belts. Eloy Jimenez is entering just his second season. Luis Robert and Nick Madrigal have yet to see a major league pitch. And there's more behind them, with last month's first-round draft pick Garrett Crochet already being described as a potential quick mover to the major leagues.

That's part of the plan, of course, for the window to stay propped open for years while the waves of talent continue to reach the South Side and develop into high-end major league players. And so whether the shortened 2020 season features the White Sox finally reaching the playoffs or not, Hahn sees the value in that big-picture goal as guys keep growing.

"We've got a limited sample here. Let's make the most of it from a development standpoint," he said Friday. "Whether that is young guys getting their major league experience under their belt and dealing with whatever adjustments have to happen throughout the league, or teaching some of the guys who have been around here a little bit longer what it takes to win and playing in an intense environment, given the magnitude of each and every game and, ideally, a pennant race down the stretch that will be compelling. So there's going to be a lot of long-term benefits from getting these guys back out here and playing."

RELATED: Michael Kopech absent from White Sox camp, adding another unknown to 2020

But while the growth continues, there's good reason to finally be excited about the present. Anderson sees what's possible, even in this most unusual of seasons, as he looks to keep evolving while the White Sox start winning.

He's not thrilled with his defense, either — he made a combined 88 errors in his first four major league campaigns — and he's looking to put in the same kind of work that turned his offensive fortunes around last year.

"Nothing came natural. I worked to get to where I’m at. But I’m going to continue to work," he said. "That’s a part of my game that’s definitely lacking. It ain’t too far behind, though. I’m getting to where I need to be.

"I’ll continue to work, I’ll continue to get better. I’m going to continue to learn the game. Each and every day, come to the ballpark ready. As I mature and as I grow, it’s going to continue to get better. You’ll see. You have seen it. All aspects of my game.

"As long as I continue to get better, continue to grow and continue to learn and work hard, that will come along as well."

And he won't say no to another batting title, either. Not that it's Priority No. 1, though.

"Hopefully I can get a ring out of it," he said, "and if the batting title comes again, then cool.

"We’ll see what happens at the end of the 60. Hopefully it’s not just 60."


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