White Sox

Who won the Chris Sale trade? Both colors of Sox might claim multiple victories when it's all said and done

Who won the Chris Sale trade? Both colors of Sox might claim multiple victories when it's all said and done

Who won the Chris Sale trade?

Despite what the world of sports talk might have to say, trades aren’t like the games themselves. They aren’t competitions. They can have multiple winners and multiple losers.

Unless they run up against Sale in the postseason one day, the White Sox won’t judge the decision to ship him to the Boston Red Sox ahead of the 2017 season based on what he does in the remainder of his potentially Hall of Fame career. They’re far more concerned with what Michael Kopech and Yoan Moncada and Luis Basabe do in White Sox uniforms. That’s how they’ll claim a win or loss.

Of course, the Red Sox have already claimed a big victory, with Sale playing a starring role in their World Series championship a little more than six months ago. Sale put up a 2.11 ERA during their 103-win regular season, then allowed just seven runs and struck out 24 batters in his 15.1 postseason innings, which included striking out all three hitters he faced in the ninth inning of the Game 5 win that clinched the championship.

Kopech and Moncada could go on to be star players. But the Red Sox got what they wanted out of Sale, and he’s got a ring to prove it, something (other than the memories, of course) to confirm his dream came true.

“It was awesome,” Sale said Saturday during his first conversation with Chicago reporters since he won the World Series. “Definitely one of those lifelong dreams you think about when you're a kid. I got to live out basically everybody's dream of being able to throw the last pitch and win a World Series and celebrate with my team, with my city, with my family. That's what you sign up to play this game for is to be the last man standing, and we were.”

Sale never came close to doing that while he pitched for the White Sox. They missed the postseason in all seven of his seasons, five of which saw him represent the team at the All-Star Game. But the reason they traded one of the best hurlers in franchise history away was to get there one day.

Sending Sale to the Red Sox brought a big haul back to the White Sox, headlined by Kopech and Moncada, two players that have fans on the South Side pretty excited. Moncada’s gotten off to a nice start in 2019, the owner of a .298/.361/.521 slash line heading into Saturday’s game.

Kopech is out for the 2019 season while recovering from Tommy John surgery but still carries hopes of being a front-of-the-rotation guy — the kind of thing Sale is for the Red Sox. There’s obviously a long way to go before that comp can be made, but someone who would know sees a few similar qualities between the two.

“(Sale is) a competitor, and I think he's one of those guys that shows it,” White Sox manager Rick Renteria said Saturday. “He shows his competitiveness, he'll show his emotion when he's disgusted with something and also show you an extreme amount of joy when he sees something done well. He's driven for success. He knows what he has and he expects the most out of himself and I think if it doesn't happen he always feel bad about not getting the result he wants. That's just the drive the man has.

“(Kopech is) real similar in terms of personality and drive. He does not like not performing well.”

The idea is that Kopech and Moncada will be part of a White Sox championship team. The best-case scenario is that they’ll be part of multiple White Sox championship teams. And that, more than anything and certainly more than what Sale does in Boston, will determine if the White Sox win the trade — and how many times they win it. If they win the World Series with Kopech and Moncada as featured contributors, that’s a win. If they win twice, that’s two wins. And so on.

The goals are the same for those two players, obviously, but they have no interest in winning trades. They do, of course, have interest in winning.

“I know that (Moncada) and myself probably would rather almost put that behind us, but not in a negative connotation,” Kopech said Friday. “Just in the fact we want to have our own careers and build a name for ourselves. It’s not a bad thing by any means. Chris Sale is Chris Sale.

“Obviously when he was here, he was a big part of the team, and me and (Moncada), we want to be our own addition to the team. We want to be able to help this team win a championship someday and hopefully someday soon. We are not really trying to prove anyone right or wrong or anything like that. It’s just now this is the team. This is who we are.”

While the White Sox bevy of uber-confident prospects have not been at all shy when it comes to talking about their championship aspirations, Sale opted not to play talent evaluator when it comes to the rebuilding White Sox.

“That’s not my area, man. I play for the Boston Red Sox. I got this team to worry about,” he said. “I enjoy coming back here and seeing everybody, and they obviously have great talent over there.

“But I’m trying to win the same thing they are. I’ll leave it at that.”

In that aspect, there is a bit of competition between Sale’s Red Sox and the White Sox. But the ultimate factor in whether the White Sox win the trade or not is if it helps get them to the place they want to be, the place Sale was at the end of last season.

Sale might have decided against handicapping the team’s chances of reaching the sport’s pinnacle, but he does think the right man is at the helm. He was very complimentary of Renteria and touted him as the right man for the job of getting the White Sox to their planned contention phase.

“He's a great baseball mind, he's a great person,” Sale said. “I think he's a guy that can get anybody in that clubhouse or anybody in any clubhouse to buy in to something. He's a fun guy to be around, but he's that no-BS (type). He wants you to run hard, he expects the best out of you. I think we've seen that at times from him as a manager already, and I think that's where the respect comes from. I've said it before, I think he's the right guy in the right place for what they've got going on.”

So who won the Chris Sale trade?

Well, the Red Sox did. And maybe they will again. Despite the ugly start to their 2019 season, the Red Sox would surprise no one by figuring things out and challenging for the crown again. And in future seasons, thanks to new contracts for Sale and Xander Bogaerts and the league-wide extension trend potentially keeping Mookie Betts in Boston, they’re sure to be contending for those championships, too.

But maybe the White Sox will win the trade, too. If Kopech returns from his recovery and turns into the ace so many expect him to be. If Moncada is more April 2019 than 2018 as he continues to develop at the major league level. A lot of other pieces of the White Sox plan would have to come to fruition if they’re going to get to the point the Red Sox were at last season. That certainly could happen, though, and if Rick Hahn’s project of building a perennial contender ends up a success, it could equal multiple championships and multiple wins of this trade.

So it’s an ongoing thing. The point is, both teams had the same goal with the deal: to win the World Series. Sale and the Red Sox got there last season. Someday, the White Sox might, too.

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White Sox place reliever Kelvin Herrera on injured list with oblique strain

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USA TODAY

White Sox place reliever Kelvin Herrera on injured list with oblique strain

The White Sox saw another pitcher hit the shelf due to injury on Saturday.

Ahead of their game against the Rays, the White Sox placed reliever Kelvin Herrera on the 10-day injured with a right oblique strain. In a corresponding move, the team recalled right-hander Jimmy Cordero from Triple-A Charlotte.

Entering the 2019 season, Herrera was expected to be a formidable late-game reliever in the White Sox bullpen alongside closer Álex Colomé. While Colomé (20-for-21 in save chances, 2.39 ERA in 37 2/3 innings) has thrived, Herrera has struggled in his debut season on the South Side. The 29-year-old holds a 7.36 ERA in 38 games/33 innings. As things currently stand, his .326 batting average against and 3.82 BB/9 would be career highs. 

Herrera's struggles are somewhat suprising when considering how well he pitched (2.44 ERA, 48 games/44 1/3 innings) in 2018. He did struggle after the Royals traded him to the Nationals on June 18, though, perhaps a precursor of what was to come from him in 2019:

Kelvin Herrera in 2018:

  with Royals with Nationals
Games 27 21
Innings 25 2/3 18 2/3
ERA 1.05 4.34
BB 2 8
K 22 16
BAA .207 .304

The White Sox claimed Cordero off of waivers from the Mariners on June 7. He previously pitched with the Nationals (22 games, 19 innings) in 2018 and Blue Jays (one game, 1 1/3 innings) in 2019. He holds a career 5.75 ERA in the MLB, but he's pitched well with Charlotte. The 28-year-old has gone 3-1 with a 0.51 ERA in 17 2/3 innings with the Knights, with opponents hitting just .215 against him in 13 outings.

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Reynaldo Lopez continues hot start to second half, helps snap White Sox losing streak

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USA TODAY

Reynaldo Lopez continues hot start to second half, helps snap White Sox losing streak

After a rough outing against the Detroit Tigers on July 4 — his last before the All-Star break — White Sox starting pitcher Reynaldo Lopez vowed to be a different pitcher going forward.

“At this point, after a really bad first half, there's not much I can say about that. Starting today, you're going to see a different pitcher going forward for the second half of the season,” Lopez said after his July 4 start through team interpreter Billy Russo. “What is done is done. There's nothing else that I can do to change what is done.

“I can do different things to get better and to be a better pitcher for the year and that's what I'm going to do.”

Two outings later, and Lopez is nearing the point where he can say “I told you so.”

Lopez has come out of the break firing on all cylinders after struggling to a 4-8 record and MLB-worst 6.34 ERA before the Midsummer Classic. Friday, he tossed seven innings of two-run ball, allowing just six hits and one walk compared to eight strikeouts. This follows his brilliant outing against the Athletics on Sunday in which he pitched six innings, allowing just three hits and one run — albeit unearned — with two walks and seven strikeouts.

Lopez exited Sunday’s game in line for a win before the White Sox bullpen slipped up. The offense allowed no such opportunity on Friday, tallying 16 hits en route to a 9-2 drubbing of the Tampa Bay Rays. It’s Lopez’s first win since June 9 against the Kansas City Royals and the White Sox first win after the break, snapping a seven-game skid.

Lopez has received a fair share of criticism this season for his struggles, but his recent success should not come as much of a surprise considering how he fared in 2018. The 25-year-old posted a 3.91 ERA in 32 starts, striking out 151 batters in 188 2/3 innings.

Lopez’s strikeout rate in 2019 is up compared to 2018 (8.19 K/9 in 2019 vs. 7.20 in 2018) and his walk rate is down (3.32 BB/9 in 2019 vs. 3.58 in 2018). The major difference is that opponents are hitting .284 against him this season compared to .234 in 2018, while also holding a .319 BABIP, up from .260 last season.

It may just be two starts, but Lopez is backing up his vow to pitch better. Between Lucas Giolito, Dylan Cease and the returns of Michael Kopech and Carlos Rodón from Tommy John surgery in 2020, the White Sox future starting rotation is in good hands. Getting Lopez back to pitching how he did in 2018 will only take that group to the next level.

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