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Who defended Steve Williams' racial slur?

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Who defended Steve Williams' racial slur?

From Comcast SportsNet
SYDNEY (AP) -- Greg Norman defended caddie Steve Williams over his racial slur about Tiger Woods, and does not believe Williams is racist. "We've all made stupid comments at stupid times, unfortunately his stupid comment became global news," Norman said Monday. "I know he probably regrets saying it, but I guarantee you in that room on that night there was probably some heavier things said." Williams' disparaging comment came during a caddies' awards party Friday in Shanghai. Norman added that Williams' current employer, Adam Scott, should ignore calls to release him. Scott has said he will stand by Williams. Norman had Williams on his bag for several years in the 1980s. He replied "no, not at all," when asked if Williams was racist. Norman spoke from The Lakes, where he'll begin play in the Australian Open on Thursday. Scott said in a statement Monday he believes "there is absolutely no room for racial discrimination in any walk of life, including the game of golf." "I have discussed this matter directly with Steve and he understands and supports my view on this subject. I also accept Steve's apology, knowing that he meant no racial slur with his comments. I now consider the matter closed. I will not be making any further comment." Woods and Scott are also playing in the Australian Open, which has attracted a strong field because of the Presidents Cup at Royal Melbourne next week. Norman disagreed with possible, but extremely unlikely, moves to pair Woods and Scott this week in Sydney for the first two rounds of the Australian Open. It was also suggested to Norman, the captain of the International side for the Presidents Cup, that he might send Scott out against Woods in the team event in Melbourne. "Of course, everybody wants to see it," Norman said. "I don't think it's the right thing to do from a promotional aspect, No. 1, because it should just be an automatic draw. I don't think there is any issue between Tiger and Adam at all." Norman said any feud between Woods and Williams needs to be sorted out. "Because of the temperature that was going on between the two of them, anything that is said or not said is going to exacerbate whatever that feeling is," Norman said. "I hope it gets resolved. Golf doesn't need it. Golf needs Tiger back playing great golf like he used to. Golf needs the cohesiveness that's always existed. "There's always been underlying currents, not everybody loves everybody and the people who dislike each other; we just have a tendency of parting our ways and not seeing each other. But to have it play out like it's played out has been a bit sad for the game." Asked if racism is a problem in golf, Norman said he's "never seen it at all." On Monday, Woods was in Melbourne, where he last won a tournament -- the Australian Masters in November 2009. Weeks later, news of his infidelities surfaced, followed by a divorce, injuries and swing changes. Woods spoke to a Melbourne radio station whose interviewers were told not to ask questions about Williams. Woods flew back to Sydney later Monday. He'll have a news conference at The Lakes on Tuesday when he's expected to respond to Williams' remarks. Woods told the Melbourne station he's seeing a gradual improvement in his game. "I've had a ruptured ACL (anterior cruciate ligament), I've had a broken leg, a torn Achilles and strained ligaments over the last five years," he said. "I've been rehabbing for so long I haven't been able to train. I'm hitting faster, more explosive, my speed's come back. I'm hitting the ball distances I know I can hit the golf ball again. It's getting fun." Woods played at the private Capital Golf Club with cricket great Shane Warne, Warne's fiancee and English actress Liz Hurley and billionaire businessman James Packer.

Why Cubs' serious, effective approach in COVID-19 pandemic might not be enough

Why Cubs' serious, effective approach in COVID-19 pandemic might not be enough

Giants catcher Buster Posey is a three-time champion, six-time All-Star and former National League MVP.

Is he a Hall of Famer? That’s the big question, right?

Not anymore. Not after Friday, when he officially opted out of playing baseball during a pandemic.

That changed the big Buster Posey question to whether he’s baseball’s smartest guy in the room.

On a day the Cubs delayed their workouts for the second time in a week over COVID-19 testing issues, Johns Hopkins University reported a single-day record of new coronavirus cases (more than 63,900) for the United States for the second consecutive day.

It’s two weeks until major league openers.

Posey, who expressed concern for the past week, was open about his decision, citing the risk when it came to the premature newborn twins he and his wife have adopted and who remain in a neonatal intensive care unit.

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He’s one of 11 players who have chosen not to play this season. Others such as superstar Mike Trout of the Angels — whose wife is due with their first child next month — continue to straddle the fence on whether to play.

And players such as Cubs star Kris Bryant expressed concern and anxiety over MLB’s first-week testing problems and at one point considered opting out before deciding to commit to trying to play.

MORE: Why Kris Bryant doesn't feel 'safe' and why his voice should matter most to MLB

“We’re taking every safeguard that we possibly can, and I’m proud of the way the players have been responding,” said Cubs president Theo Epstein, whose team is the only one, at least in the National League, without a positive test among players or coaches since intake testing began.

“But we can’t let our guard down, and we can’t fool ourselves into thinking we can control all the variables here.”

The variables, and certainly the risk, are constantly changing.

In Florida, one of the hardest hit states for coronavirus surges, Miami-Dade County reported an astounding 28-percent positive rate for its Friday test results — down from 33.5 percent Thursday.

That, of course, is the home of the Miami Marlins.

Two more of the hardest hit states across the sun belt, Texas (105) and California (149) reported one-day records for coronavirus-related deaths on Thursday.

They are home to seven more big-league teams, including Posey’s and Trout’s.

Again, it’s two weeks until major league openers — when teams leave their individual safe zones and start to travel.

Will Trout still want to play by then? Will Nationals closer Sean Doolittle? The Brewers’ Ryan Braun? Or anybody else who has dipped one toe into this experiment as they’ve talked publicly about their concerns and reservations?

And just how tight will MLB’s testing ship — and shipping of results — be by then?

The Cubs by all appearances are doing it right, from masks in the clubhouse and dugouts to social distancing and meetings among players to discuss being accountable to each other and staying out of bars and restaurants when they’re away from the field.

But what about the cluster of positives among the Phillies, or the startling virus rates in Arizona — or that one player in Cleveland who decided to party without a mask during the holiday weekend?

“That’s the reality of living in this country in 2020, is you’re never divorced from concern, no matter what you’re doing,” Epstein said. “Whether you’re home with your family or running errands or working from home or trying to pull off a baseball season in the middle of a pandemic, the subtext of everything that you do is concern.

“Not just concern for yourself, not just concern for your families, but concern for your teammates, your colleagues, your brothers and sisters, your community, the country as a whole and the world as a whole — although certainly the rest of the world has seemingly managed their way into a better place at the moment than we have.”

As countries through much of Europe and parts of Asia have effectively mobilized at a federal level to stem the spread of the virus, the United States has experienced a summer surge within what experts consider the first of possibly multiple waves of the pandemic, the death toll climbing past 135,000 — close to twice the total of Brazil, which has the second-highest number of virus-related deaths.

“We don’t have a huge margin for error,” Epstein said of the league’s safety and health protocols designed by the only major professional league trying to play games at all of its home sites. “As we move forward, as we continue to try to pull this off, we have to continue to find a way to keep our players safe and healthy.”

Against a moving target. Without any way to know what direction it might take tomorrow, much less August.

“The virus is the only thing in control right now,” Epstein said.

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Where Blackhawks stand after NHL rules play-in series will count as playoff stats

Where Blackhawks stand after NHL rules play-in series will count as playoff stats

The Blackhawks are officially back in the playoffs.

In a joint statement by the NHL and NHL Players' Association announcing the ratification of the Return to Play plan and Collective Bargaining Agreement extension, it was revealed that all player and team stats from the round-robin tournament and qualifying round will be counted towards the 2020 postseason, and that teams participating in a best-of-five series during the Stanley Cup Qualifiers are considered to have made the postseason.

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It's the first postseason berth in three years for the Blackhawks, who made the playoffs nine consecutive seasons from 2009-17 before missing out the past two. That's good news for Chicago, but a shortened regular season comes at a price for some individuals on the roster, although they probably won't lose too much sleep over it.

  • Jonathan Toews is one of three active players and only 17 in NHL history to score at least 20 goals in each of his first 12 seasons, and he was on pace to make it 13 but finished the pause with 18. Patrick Kane and Alex Ovechkin are now the only two active players whose streak have reached 13 seasons.
     
  • Patrick Kane was on pace to finish with 98 points but won't get a crack at hitting the 100-point mark for the third time in his career.
     
  • Dominik Kubalik scored his 30th goal in the final game before the season was put on pause to become the sixth rookie in Blackhawks history to reach that number, but he was on pace for 35 and was robbed of an opportunity to tie Jeremy Roenick for third-most on the team's rookie list; only Steve Larmer (43) and Darryl Sutter (40) have scored more than 35.
     
  • After scoring 28 goals his rookie season and 41 his second year, Alex DeBrincat finished the 2019-20 campaign with 18 tallies, falling short of a third straight 20-goal season.


Now for the good news:

  • Corey Crawford ranks No. 1 in franchise history with 48 playoff wins. He needs two more to become just the 20th goaltender in NHL history to hit the 50-win mark. Only three other active netminders rank ahead of Crawford: Marc-Andre Fleury (78), Henrik Lundqvist (61) and Tuukka Rask (50).
     
  • Kane ranks fourth in franchise history with 123 postseason points; he needs six more to tie Bobby Hull (129) for third.
     
  • Toews ranks sixth in franchise history with 110 postseason points; he needs one more to tie Steve Larmer (111) for fifth.
     
  • Toews is also three games away from tying Denis Savard (131) for second on the Blackhawks' all-time postseason games played list; only Stan Mikita (155) has appeared in more. Kane ranks fifth at 127, Keith is sixth at 126 and Seabrook is seventh at 123.
     
  • Connor Murphy is FINALLY set to appear in his first postseason contest after going six straight years without one. Only four active players and 10 in NHL history have had a longer drought than Murphy, who's played in 444 regular-season games.