Bulls

Word: Bears denied entry to Halas Hall

Word: Bears denied entry to Halas Hall

Thursday, April 28, 2011
CSNChicago.com
Olsen, Gould denied entry to weight room

The NFL Lockout has been officially lifted, but some Bears players who have made an effort to get back to work have been denied entry to the Halas Hall weight room. Greg Olson, Robbie Gould and Kahlil Bell were among the players who attempted to work out at Halas Hall on Thursday morning, but were disallowed from entering the weight room.

"Pretty much all you could do is walk in, walk around, and walk out," Bell said. "I didn't see any of the coaches. Just the training staff and the strength coach."

"I mean, it's been a long time, and we've never spent this much time apart," Bell said of not being able to work out with his teammates. "I was figuring everything would be cool. But I guess that's not happening." (Chicago Tribune)

NFL tells teams to lift lockout

Hours after news broke that Greg Olsen, Robbie Gould and Kahlil Bell were denied entry to the Halas Hall weight room, the NFL has told teams to begin allowing players to resume football operations on Friday morning. The league is also releasing detailed guidelines for teams to follow in regards to signing and trading players. (The Pueblo Chieftain)

Cavallari shows off ring

Kristin Cavallari, reality TV star and fiance of Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler, was caught wearing her new engagement ring. TMZ posted the photos on their website, which were apparently taken on Wednesday in Los Angeles. (TMZ.com)

Sox to unveil "Harrelson Level"
The Chicago White Sox will unveil a plaque commemorating the "Hawk Harrelson Broadcast Level" at U.S. Cellular Field on Friday before the Sox take on the Baltimore Orioles. Hawk is in his 26th season as the Sox television announcer, including 22 consecutive seasons. Jerry Reinsdorf and radio play-by-play announcer Ed Farmer will attend the event. (ChicagoBreakingSports)

Former Gov. takes over sports facilities agency

The Illinois Sports Facilities Authority, who own and operate U.S. Cellular Field, terminated the contract of long time executive director Perri Irmer on Wednesday. Former Republican Gov. James Thompson will fill the position until a replacement is found. According to Thompson, this was a move that had been planned for some time and that Irmer had been working under a month-to-month agreement since she signed her last contract. (Clout Street - Chicago Tribune Blog)

Shai Gilgeous-Alexander stock is on the rise; just how high will he climb?

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USA TODAY

Shai Gilgeous-Alexander stock is on the rise; just how high will he climb?

John Calipari's 2017 recruiting class featured five McDonald's All-Americans and Hamidou Diallo, a former five-star recruit who nearly jumped to the NBA the previous year. It also included a lanky 6-foot-6 point guard named Shai Gilgeous-Alexander. And for the first part of the 2017-18 season, the Toronto native who played his final two high school years in Tennessee, appeared to be a nice fit off the bench for Calipari.

But something flipped. Gilgeous-Alexander was inserted into the starting lineup for good on January 9 and never looked back. He played his best basketball beginning in late February to the end of the season, a span of 10 games against eight NCAA Tournament opponents. In those games Gilgeous-Alexander averaged 19.0 points, 6.3 rebounds and 6.7 assists. He shot 51 percent from the field, 50 percent from deep and 84 percent from the free throw line, and added 1.4 steals in nearly 38 minutes per game for good measure. He was one of the best players in the country, and on a team with five McDonald's All-Americans, he was Calipari's best freshman.

"I knew with how hard I worked that anything was possible," SGA said at last week's NBA Draft Combine in Chicago. "It was just a matter of time before it started clicking and I started to get it rolling."

That stretch included a 17-point, 10-assist double-double against Ole Miss, a 29-point showing against Tennessee in the SEC Tournament, and 27 more points in the second round of the NCAA Tournament against Buffalo. Even in his worst game of the stretch, a 15-point effort against Kansas State in the Tournament, he made up for 2 of 10 shooting by getting to the free throw line 12, converting 11 of them.

It made his decision to make the jump to the NBA an easy one - that, and another loaded Calipari recruiting class incoming. He stands taller than just about any other point guard in the class and might have as good a jump shot as any. He's adept at getting to the rim, averaging 4.7 free throw attempts per game (that number jumped to 5.6 after he became a starter, and 7.5 in those final 10 games of the season. He isn't the quickest guard in the class, but he uses his feet well, is able to find open shooters due to his height and improved on making mistakes on drive-and-kicks as the season went on.

"I think I translate really well to the next level with there being so much more space on the floor and the open court stretched out," he said. "It only benefits me and my ability to get in the lane and make plays."

There's something to be said for him being the next in line of the Calipari point guards. The ever-growing list includes players like Derrick Rose, John Wall, Tyreke Evans, Eric Bledsoe, Jamal Murray and DeAaron Fox. It's the NBA's version of Penn State linebackers or Alabama defensive linemen. The success rate is nearly 100 percent when it comes to Calipari's freshmen point guards; even Brandon Knight averaged 18.1 points over a three-year span in the NBA.

"That’s why guys go to Kentucky," Gilgeous-Alexander said. "It prepares them for the next level. Coach (Calipari) does a really good job, especially with point guards, getting them ready for that next level in a short amount of time."

Gilgeous-Alexander didn't test or play in the 5-on-5 scrimmages, but he still came out of Chicago a winner. He measured 6-foot-6 in shoes with a ridiculous 6-foot-11 1/2 wingspan, a full three inches longer than any other point guard at the Combine. He also added, rather uniquely, that he watches of film Kawhi Leonard playing defense. Most players don't mention watching film on different-position players; most players aren't 6-foot-6 point guards.

"(It's) obviously a more versatile league and playing small ball. And with me being able to guard multiple positions, a lot of teams are switching things like the pick and roll off ball screens, so me being able to switch and guard multiple positions can help an organization."

Gilgeous-Alexander's arrow is pointing way up. He appears to be teetering near Lottery pick status, though that could go one way or the other in private team workouts, especially if he's pitted against fellow top point guards like Trae Young and Collin Sexton. But if his rise at Kentucky is any indication, he'll only continue to improve his game, his stock and eventually his draft position.

Danny Farquhar to throw out the first pitch before White Sox game on June 1

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AP

Danny Farquhar to throw out the first pitch before White Sox game on June 1

In another example of how amazing Danny Farquhar’s recovery has been, the pitcher will throw out the ceremonial first pitch before the White Sox game on June 1.

Farquhar suffered a brain hemorrhage from a ruptured aneurysm during the sixth inning of the team’s April 20 game against the Houston Astros. But his recovery has been astounding, and he was discharged from the hospital on May 7. Farquhar’s neurosurgeon expects him to be able to pitch again in future seasons.

Farquhar has been back to visit his teammates at Guaranteed Rate Field a couple times since leaving the hospital. June 1 will mark his return to a big league mound, even if it’s only for a ceremonial first pitch with his wife and three children. Doctors, nurses and staff from RUSH University Medical Center will be on hand for Farquhar’s pitch on June 1.

The White Sox announced that in celebration of Farquhar’s recovery, they will donate proceeds from all fundraising efforts on June 1 to the Joe Niekro Foundation, an organization committed to supporting patients and families, research, treatment and awareness of brain aneurysms.