Bears

Word on the Street: '85 Bears best team of all time?

Word on the Street: '85 Bears best team of all time?

Friday, Feb. 4, 2011
CSNChicago.com

'85 Bears best team in history?

According to Jim Ruppert of the State Journal-Register, the '85 Bears were the best team in NFL history.He attributes the talent of Da Coach Mike Ditka, Hall of Famers WalterPayton, Dan Hampton, and Mike Singletary, plus legends like JimMcMahon, Steve McMichael, and Jim Covert to the team's success. (State Journal-Register)

Burish placed on IR

The Stars announced that right wing and ex-Blackhawk Adam Burish was placed on Injured Reserve with a facial injury. He suffered the injury Feb. 3 at Boston.

Burish has appeared in 52 games for Dallas this season, scoring seven goals and four assits for 11 points. The seven goals and 11 points are new career-highs. (DallasStars.com)

Deng 'disappointed' about All-Star snub

Despite being 20 games over .500 at 34-14, the Bulls will only be sending one player to the NBA All-Star Game. Derrick Rose will make the trip to Los Angeles on Feb. 20. And Luol Deng is surprised about that decision.

"I'm dissapointed," he said. "To go there and represent the team would've been great. It's weird to me we only have one. All I can do is put it past me."

Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau said he felt both Deng and Carlos Boozer were deserving of All-Star selections. (Chicago Breaking Sports)

Bears sign Canadian receiver

The Bears signed a big, physical receiver that they hope will compliment their existing receiving corps. The 6-foot-4, 220-pound Canadian Football League veteran Andy Fantuz was signed to a reservefuture contract.

The Ontario native led the CFL with 1,380 receiving yards on 87 catches and six touchdown in 2010. Fantuz spent five seasons with the Saskatchewan Roughriders, hauling in 276 receptions for 4,136 yards and 23 touchdowns. (Chicago Sun-Times)
Brewers sign Kotsay

According to the team, the Brewers singed Mark Kotsay to a Major League contract. Kotsay will earn 800K plus a 100K roster bonus and 350K in performance bonuses. The 35-year-old will provide the Brewers with another option in the outfield and at first base.

Hitting .239.306.376 in 359 plate appearances last season for the White Sox, Kotsay clubbed eight homers while playing first base and right field. (MLBtraderumors.com)

Falling ice injures workers at Super Bowl stadium

Local media reports have said between five and seven people were injured after sheets of ice and snow slid off the doomed roof of Cowboys Stadium and fell to the ground as a result of warming temperatures after four days of freezing conditions. All entrances to the venue have been closed except for one.

Forecasters expect a mostly sunny Super Bowl Sunday with highs in the 40s. The stadium's retractable roof will be closed. (Chicago Breaking Sports)

McMahon reports memory loss

Jim McMahon is in Dallas ahead of Sunday's Super Bowl between the Green Bay Packers and the Pittsburgh Steelers hoping to shine a spotlight on a crisis that has suddenly become the NFL's hot-button issue: head injuries.

The Super Bowl-winning QB reports that he has experienced memory loss and is working with the Sport Legacy Institute (SLI), a non-profit organization whose mission is to help advance the study, treatment and prevention of head trauma in athletes. McMahon suffered at least five concussions during his 15 seasons, which has exacted a heavy toll. (L.A. Times)

Islanders goalie out 4-6 weeks after KO

In the first NHL goalie fight in over three years, New York Islanders goalie Rick DiPietro suffered a solid left hit to the chin from Penguins goalie Brent Johnson on Wednesday. Now, Pietro is expected to miss the next four to six weeks with facial fractures.

"You never go into a fight expecting you're going to get smashed in the face that hard or with these kind of consequences," DiPietro said. "It happens... Unfortunately my face paid the price." (Chicago Breaking Sports)

Ryan Pace finds silver lining in social distancing at Halas Hall

Ryan Pace finds silver lining in social distancing at Halas Hall

Bears general manager Ryan Pace, like everyone else in the United States right now, is doing his best to do his job in what's become a bizarre new normal of social distancing. Fortunately for him and the rest of the team's staff and players, Halas Hall is well-equipped to handle COVID-19's challenges.

The renovations at Halas Hall couldn't have come at a better time. The more expansive campus provides the Bears with the space needed to keep the players and coaches as safe as possible. For Pace, it offers a greater opportunity to appreciate the little things while catching a meal with Matt Nagy.

“So the last two nights, we discovered how nice it is,” Pace said, via MMQB. “You sit out there, and it forces you to take a different vantage point during the day. Beautiful view, and it’s pretty peaceful.”

As Albert Breer pointed out, Pace and Nagy's view includes four outdoor practice fields and a couple of ponds. Not too shabby.

The most important takeaway isn't the landscape. Instead, it's safety. 

NFL players have until Thursday to decide whether they'll opt-out of the 2020 season, and for teams that are lacking the facilities Chicago has, it's more likely high-risk players or those with families at high-risk will choose to sit out the season.

Bears nose tackle Eddie Goldman and safety Jordan Lucas have decided to opt out this year, and there's a chance more will do the same. 

Pace is confident in Chicago's COVID-19 plan. We'll see if the players are too.

For now, Pace is finding comfort in the little things. 

Why Chicago Cubs starters Jon Lester, Alec Mills are two of MLB's best pitchers

Why Chicago Cubs starters Jon Lester, Alec Mills are two of MLB's best pitchers

Usually when GMs, managers and fans get ready for a baseball season, any consistent production from the Nos. 4 and 5 starters is a luxury. In the Cubs’ case, it’s been an embarrassment of riches through two turns of the rotation.

Through 10 games, the Cubs are 8-2, good for the best win percentage in the National League. One huge reason for that has been the team’s incredible starting pitching. Kyle Hendricks set the tone early when he pitched a complete game shutout in the very first game of the season. Now, the Cubs’ starters lead MLB in ERA (1.95), batting average against (.156) and WHIP (0.780). They’ve done all that while also throwing 60 innings, second only to the Indians who have thrown 70 innings.

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At first glance you’d probably think, yeah, that makes sense with Hendricks starting the season the way he did, and Darvish getting back on track with six innings of two-hit ball in his second start. But surprisingly the only two clunkers came in Hendricks and Darvish starts. In fact, the analytics say Jon Lester and Alec Mills, the Cubs’ last two guys in the rotation have been two of the most impressive starters in MLB.

Let’s start by looking at the ERAs of all starters who have at least 8 IP, since the name of the game is keeping runs off the board. If 8 IP seems like an arbitrary cutoff… well, it is. But it seems like a fair number to assess quality pitchers who have made two starts in this shortened season with short leashes on pitchers. Among those pitchers, Lester and Mills each rank in the top-10 with ERAs of 0.82 and 1.38, respectively, according to FanGraphs.

So how are they doing it? Neither is a power pitcher who relies on strikeouts. In fact, Lester’s four punchouts place him tied for fourth-fewest in our split of SPs who have thrown more than 8 IP. Mills’ seven strikeouts (tied for 10th-fewest) aren’t much better. These guys succeed by keeping guys off the base paths, and not allowing hard-hit balls.

Looking at batting average against, Lester and Mills move into MLB’s top-five, according to our FanGraphs split, with each pitcher holding batters under .120. Since we’ve already established that neither guy is a power pitcher, when we filter further to just show BAA on balls put in play it should come as no surprise that Lester and Mills rise to No. 1 and No. 2 in all of baseball with .118 and .139 marks, respectively.

Great defense, like Javy Baez’s tag in Monday’s game, certainly helps the pitchers’ stats. But the starters also make things easier on the defense by inducing poor contact, regardless of whether the ball is hit on the ground or the air. According to FanGraphs, Mills ranks second in MLB by inducing soft contact on 33.3% of all balls put into play. In addition, he’s 11th in MLB with a 54.3 ground ball percentage. Lester ranks ninth by getting hitters to make soft contact 26.5% of the time, although he’s 11th in the league in getting batters to hit fly balls 47.1% of the time.

In the end the result is the same, with Mills and Lester combining to only allow four extra base hits in 24 IP. So although they aren’t typical “dominant” pitchers that teams like to make their aces, Mills and Lester have been two of the most effective starters in the game.


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