White Sox

Word on the Street: '85 Bears best team of all time?

Word on the Street: '85 Bears best team of all time?

Friday, Feb. 4, 2011
CSNChicago.com

'85 Bears best team in history?

According to Jim Ruppert of the State Journal-Register, the '85 Bears were the best team in NFL history.He attributes the talent of Da Coach Mike Ditka, Hall of Famers WalterPayton, Dan Hampton, and Mike Singletary, plus legends like JimMcMahon, Steve McMichael, and Jim Covert to the team's success. (State Journal-Register)

Burish placed on IR

The Stars announced that right wing and ex-Blackhawk Adam Burish was placed on Injured Reserve with a facial injury. He suffered the injury Feb. 3 at Boston.

Burish has appeared in 52 games for Dallas this season, scoring seven goals and four assits for 11 points. The seven goals and 11 points are new career-highs. (DallasStars.com)

Deng 'disappointed' about All-Star snub

Despite being 20 games over .500 at 34-14, the Bulls will only be sending one player to the NBA All-Star Game. Derrick Rose will make the trip to Los Angeles on Feb. 20. And Luol Deng is surprised about that decision.

"I'm dissapointed," he said. "To go there and represent the team would've been great. It's weird to me we only have one. All I can do is put it past me."

Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau said he felt both Deng and Carlos Boozer were deserving of All-Star selections. (Chicago Breaking Sports)

Bears sign Canadian receiver

The Bears signed a big, physical receiver that they hope will compliment their existing receiving corps. The 6-foot-4, 220-pound Canadian Football League veteran Andy Fantuz was signed to a reservefuture contract.

The Ontario native led the CFL with 1,380 receiving yards on 87 catches and six touchdown in 2010. Fantuz spent five seasons with the Saskatchewan Roughriders, hauling in 276 receptions for 4,136 yards and 23 touchdowns. (Chicago Sun-Times)
Brewers sign Kotsay

According to the team, the Brewers singed Mark Kotsay to a Major League contract. Kotsay will earn 800K plus a 100K roster bonus and 350K in performance bonuses. The 35-year-old will provide the Brewers with another option in the outfield and at first base.

Hitting .239.306.376 in 359 plate appearances last season for the White Sox, Kotsay clubbed eight homers while playing first base and right field. (MLBtraderumors.com)

Falling ice injures workers at Super Bowl stadium

Local media reports have said between five and seven people were injured after sheets of ice and snow slid off the doomed roof of Cowboys Stadium and fell to the ground as a result of warming temperatures after four days of freezing conditions. All entrances to the venue have been closed except for one.

Forecasters expect a mostly sunny Super Bowl Sunday with highs in the 40s. The stadium's retractable roof will be closed. (Chicago Breaking Sports)

McMahon reports memory loss

Jim McMahon is in Dallas ahead of Sunday's Super Bowl between the Green Bay Packers and the Pittsburgh Steelers hoping to shine a spotlight on a crisis that has suddenly become the NFL's hot-button issue: head injuries.

The Super Bowl-winning QB reports that he has experienced memory loss and is working with the Sport Legacy Institute (SLI), a non-profit organization whose mission is to help advance the study, treatment and prevention of head trauma in athletes. McMahon suffered at least five concussions during his 15 seasons, which has exacted a heavy toll. (L.A. Times)

Islanders goalie out 4-6 weeks after KO

In the first NHL goalie fight in over three years, New York Islanders goalie Rick DiPietro suffered a solid left hit to the chin from Penguins goalie Brent Johnson on Wednesday. Now, Pietro is expected to miss the next four to six weeks with facial fractures.

"You never go into a fight expecting you're going to get smashed in the face that hard or with these kind of consequences," DiPietro said. "It happens... Unfortunately my face paid the price." (Chicago Breaking Sports)

White Sox Talk Podcast: Manny Machado Mania

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: Manny Machado Mania

Manny Machado to the White Sox?? It's been the dream for many White Sox fans for months.

With Machado in town to the play the White Sox, Chuck Garfien and Vinnie Duber discuss the White Sox chances of signing the soon-to-be-free agent.

Garfien also talks with Nicky Delmonico who played with Machado and fellow free agent to be Bryce Harper on the U.S.A. 18-under national team.

Listen to the full episode at this link or in the embedded player below:

Rick Renteria issues another benching after Welington Castillo doesn't hustle on popup

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USA TODAY

Rick Renteria issues another benching after Welington Castillo doesn't hustle on popup

One thing you better do if you play for Rick Renteria is run to first base.

Yet again, Renteria benched one of his players Monday for the sin of not hustling down the line.

Welington Castillo, a veteran, not a developing player in need of ample “learning experiences,” popped up to first base with two runners on and nobody out in the sixth inning of Monday’s eventual 3-2 loss to the visiting Baltimore Orioles. He did not run down to first, instead staying at home plate.

So when the inning ended and the White Sox took the field, Castillo stayed in the dugout.

Ricky’s boys don’t quit, or so the slogan goes. But what happens when a player doesn’t live up to that mantra? What happens when they don’t play their absolute hardest for all 27 outs, as the T-shirts preach? This is what happens. A benching.

“It was towering fly ball in the infield at first, probably had 15, 20 seconds of hangtime,” Renteria explained after the game. “I assumed the dropped ball. It has occurred. He could, at minimum, at least start moving that way.

“That’s uncharacteristic of him, to be honest, it truly is. Maybe he was just frustrated in that he had the fly ball and just stayed at the plate, but there was no movement toward first at all. And you guys have heard me talk to all the guys about at least giving an opportunity to move in that particular direction.

“Everybody says, ‘Well, 99 out of (100) times he’s going to catch that ball.’ And then that one time that he doesn’t, what would I do if the ball had been dropped? Would it have made it easier to pull him? Well, it was just as easy because you expect not the best, but the worst.

“That is uncharacteristic of that young man. I had a quick conversation with him on the bench, and he knew and that was it.”

It might seem a little overdramatic, a little nutty, even, to sit down a veteran catcher brought in this offseason to provide some offense and to do it in a one-run game. But this rebuild is about more than just waiting around for the minor league talent to make its way to the South Side. It’s about developing an organizational culture, too. And Renteria feels that if he lets this kind of thing slide at the big league level, that won’t send the right message to those precious prospects who will one day fill out this lineup.

“There’s one way to do it, you get your action, you start moving toward that direction in which you’ve got to go,” Renteria said. “What would’ve happened if everybody’s watching it — and I’m setting the tone for not only here, our club, (but also for) everybody in the minor leagues — and they’re saying, ‘Well, at the top, they said they’re going to do this and then they don’t do it.’

“It’s really simple. And people might like it, not like it. I’ve got to do this, do that so everybody understands what we’re trying to do here. We’re not done with what we’re trying to do.”

This isn’t the first time this has happened in 2018. Avisail Garcia was taken out of a game during spring training for not giving maximum effort. Leury Garcia was removed from a game earlier this month for not busting it down the first-base line on a weak grounder that went right to the first baseman.

It’s become a somewhat common tactic for Renteria, and while it might strike some as taking things a little too seriously, what good is this developmental season if a culture goes undeveloped? The White Sox have placed their bright future, in part, in Renteria’s hands, and they’ve talked glowingly about how the players have bought into his style and how the team played last season under his leadership.

If Renteria truly is the right man for the rebuild, things like this are how he’s going to establish his culture. And it will, he hopes, impact how all those prospects play when they’re no longer prospects and the White Sox are contending for championships.