Cubs

Word on the Street: Cubs looking to the bleachers

Word on the Street: Cubs looking to the bleachers

Friday, Sept. 9, 2011
CSNChicago.com

Cubs drop prices on bleacher seats

Even with a 62-81 record, the Cubs have managed to bring in 2.8 million fans this year, showing definite promise to hit the 3 million mark by the end of the season. However, attendance hasnt been as hot in the bleachers, worrying the franchise about how the crowd will appear on television. The team is planning on lowering the cost of the bleacher seats next season, hoping to raise the 500 person-per-game drop the section is experiencing. The new cost for tickets has not been released yet. (HardballTalk)

Jordan: Best team in NBA 2K12?

Michael Jordan shows off quite a bit of bling and the success of the Bulls throughout the years. In his latest commercial for NBA 2K12, Jordan challenges fans to find a more successful team to take to the court. Will you go with the 96 Chicago Bulls? (YouTube)

Barber out for Sunday

The Bears have confirmed that Marion Barber will be out for Sundays game opener against the Atlanta Falcons due to his calf injury. Cory Wootton is listed as questionable, but is unlikely to play. Wootton was injured in a preseason game and is recovering from knee surgery. (ChicagoTribune)

LaHair back in the lineup

The Cubs are giving Bryan LaHair another chance to show what hes got. Hell be playing tonight at Citi Field, taking the place of Tyler Colvin who has been playing against right-handers.

Casey Coleman will be on the mound tonight, shooting to get his first win. Darwin Barney is back in the lineup after missing Wednesdays game for the birth of his daughter. (ChicagoTribune)

Canucks responsible for rioting costs?

As if losing game 7 of the Stanley Cup Championships wasnt difficult enough, the Canucks are now taking heat from the mayor of Vancouver for riots that broke out after their loss to Boston. Due to the citys large bills for the clean up and repair of buildings, mayor Gregor Robertson has asked the team to cover part of the cost. The city hopes to meet with the team and NHL to discuss a possible outcome that everyone can agree on. (ProHockeyTalk)
Dodgers bid called a publicity stunt

The shocking 1.2 billion offer for the LA Dodgers was called a publicity stunt by Frank McCourts lawyer. It is believed that McCourt has not responded to the bid in any way. He claims he still has no intentions to sell his team. (HardballTalk)

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Kyle Schwarber puts on a show in Home Run Derby

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USA TODAY

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Kyle Schwarber puts on a show in Home Run Derby

Jon Greenberg, Rich Campbell and Kevin Fishbain join Luke on the panel.  Kyle Schwarber puts up the good fight in the Home Run Derby. Meanwhile, which Chicago All-Star will have a breakout performance on the national stage?

Plus Rich Campbell discusses why Roquan Smith’s deal may not get done before the Bears’ first practice in Bourbonnais.

Jose Abreu didn't come to White Sox looking for leadership role, but he's the face of the franchise on the All-Star stage

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USA TODAY

Jose Abreu didn't come to White Sox looking for leadership role, but he's the face of the franchise on the All-Star stage

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Jose Abreu didn’t come to the White Sox to be a leader. But that’s what he is as he took his spot among the best in baseball at Tuesday night’s All-Star Game.

Abreu is the face of the South Side baseball club and he’s had a stellar-enough first four and a half seasons in Major League Baseball to earn the distinction of a starter in the Midsummer Classic. But Abreu, unsurprisingly, doesn’t look at himself as one of the best in the game. He looks as himself as a hard-worker.

“I don’t believe that I’m the best,” Abreu said through a team translator on Monday. “I’m just a person who likes to work hard every day and try to do my best.”

That humility is nothing new to folks who follow the White Sox on a regular basis. And neither is talk of Abreu’s work ethic, the admiration of everyone involved with the team and a constant talking point from Rick Hahn, Rick Renteria and all Abreu’s teammates.

Abreu has become as important for his off-the-field roles as he has for his on-the-field production for this rebuilding White Sox team. He’s been described as a role model for all the young players in the organization, whether they’re on the big league roster right now or coming up through the system.

“None of them have told me that yet,” Abreu joked. “But I know that. It’s definitely a compliment, and I take it as something that makes you feel good, something that makes you keep moving forward and to keep trying to help the guys to improve and get better as a team. You feel like that is a big honor, that people think that way of you.”

As good as he feels to be held in such esteem, Abreu didn’t set out to be one of this team’s leaders when he came to the United States. And to be honest, he might not be in his current position if it weren’t for the team’s rebuilding effort. Abreu is one of the few veterans on this team.

“That was something that happened. I didn’t look for it,” Abreu said. “I was always trying to help people and trying to give advice to help people to improve. But I never tried to be a leader. If people say that because of what I do, that’s good, but that’s not something that I’m trying to force or something that I say, ‘I want to be a leader.’ No, that’s not who I am. I am just the kind of person who likes to help people, who likes to give advice.”

Abreu is seemingly the definition of what the White Sox want their next winning roster to be full of. And whether it’s the special relationship he has with fellow Cuban Yoan Moncada or the role-model status he holds in the eyes of his other teammates, both current and future, he’s helping the White Sox develop those kinds of players.

Oh, and he’s generally — though this season has seen an extended slump and atypical numbers — one of the most consistently productive hitters in the game.

Who wouldn’t want all that as the face of the franchise?

“It’s all a blessing. I can’t ask for anything else,” Abreu said. “I’m a true believer that if you work hard, good things are going to happen. That’s why I work hard every day, I try to do my best, I try to improve every day and just to be a better person. Not just a better player, but a better person.”