White Sox

Word on the Street: Rose day-to-day with wrist sprain

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Word on the Street: Rose day-to-day with wrist sprain

Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010
CSNChicago.com

Rose has sprained wrist, day-to day

Monday night's Bulls-Pacers game provided a few terrifying scenes for Bulls fans. Nothing to do with the score, though - the Bulls trampled the Pacers by a final score of 92-73. The scary scenes came courtesy of Derrick Rose, who twice found himself on the floor writhing in pain after going to the basket hard. After his second fall, cause by a collision with Indiana's Brandon Rush, Rose could be seen holding his wrist.

Rose had an X-ray after the game, which came back negative, and was diagnosed with a sprained wrist and bruised elbow. His status for Wednesday's game in Toronto is unknown; he is currently listed as "day-to-day" according to CSNChicago.com Bulls Insider Aggrey Sam.

I know tomorrow is probably going to be a bad day, especially resting and sleeping, Rose said. Its going to be tight. Everything is going to be tight on my body, but Ill get treatment, and weve got to play in a couple more days. (Chicago Sun-Times)
Obama, Kobe talk smack
Kobe Bryant and his LA Lakers visited Washington D.C. on Monday to do community service with President Barack Obama at the local Boys & Girls Club. While there, Obama reportedly gave Kobe a hard time about LA's recent 88-84 loss at the hand of the president's home-town Bulls.

"My Bulls are showing some signs of life," Obama told Bryant. "Derrick Rose may have your number."

"I said, 'If he calls that number, I'll be sure to pick up after the fifth ring,'" Bryant replied. (Chicago Sun-Times)

Prior inks deal with Yankees

Former Cubs draft pick and star pitcher Mark Prior has reportedly signed a minor-league deal with the New York Yankees. The deal includes a big-league camp invitation and could be worth as much as 750,000, plus another 750,000 in incentives.

The Yankees just recently lost out on the Cliff Lee sweepstakes, but a reunion with former Cubs pitching coach Larry Rothschild in the Bronx may help turn Prior's career around. However, the issue with Prior has never been talent, but health, as the former ace has not pitched in the Major Leagues since 2006 now. He was 1-6 with a 7.21 ERA for the Cubs last year. (Chicago Tribune)

Hjalmarsson buys 1.32M home

Blackhawks defenseman Niklas Hjalmarsson recently bought a 1.32 million four-bedroom town house in a gated development in River West. Hjalmarsson, a Swedish native, was drafted by the Blackhawks in 2005 and joined the team in 2008. The home is 4,000 square feet, has 12 rooms, 3-12 baths, a fireplace, and a two-car garage. Other star athletes living in the same community include Dwayne Wade and Shawn Marion. (ChicagoBreakingBusiness)

Jackson holds clinic for military families

Most people spend the weekend before Thanksgiving shopping for the massive feast to come or maybe cleaning their house in anticipation of visitors. Not Edwin Jackson. The White Sox starter spent his pre-thanksgiving weekend holding a free on-field clinic for children of military families at Fort Benning. Jackson's father, Edwin Sr., served as a cook manager and ran the mess hall at the base between 1991 and 1996.

"Definitely this becomes a long day, but it's worth it," said Jackson after the Fort Benning program. "It's worth it all around with all of the people you touch." (MLB.com)

Cliff Lee signs with Philadelphia

This offseason's most prized free agent has finally found a home. On Monday evening reports broke that Cliff Lee reached a preliminary agreement on a five-year, 100 million contract. The Phillies offer, which Lee ultimately accepted, is far less lucrative than other contracts that are rumored to have been offered to him. According to a person familiar with the Yankees' negotiations, New York's initial offer was six years, 138 million. After Carl Crawford agreed to his massive seven-year, 142 million contract with Boston the Yankees' offer reportedly increased to 150 million. (Tribune News Services)

White Sox Talk Podcast: Manny Machado Mania

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: Manny Machado Mania

Manny Machado to the White Sox?? It's been the dream for many White Sox fans for months.

With Machado in town to the play the White Sox, Chuck Garfien and Vinnie Duber discuss the White Sox chances of signing the soon-to-be-free agent.

Garfien also talks with Nicky Delmonico who played with Machado and fellow free agent to be Bryce Harper on the U.S.A. 18-under national team.

Listen to the full episode at this link or in the embedded player below:

Rick Renteria issues another benching after Welington Castillo doesn't hustle on popup

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USA TODAY

Rick Renteria issues another benching after Welington Castillo doesn't hustle on popup

One thing you better do if you play for Rick Renteria is run to first base.

Yet again, Renteria benched one of his players Monday for the sin of not hustling down the line.

Welington Castillo, a veteran, not a developing player in need of ample “learning experiences,” popped up to first base with two runners on and nobody out in the sixth inning of Monday’s eventual 3-2 loss to the visiting Baltimore Orioles. He did not run down to first, instead staying at home plate.

So when the inning ended and the White Sox took the field, Castillo stayed in the dugout.

Ricky’s boys don’t quit, or so the slogan goes. But what happens when a player doesn’t live up to that mantra? What happens when they don’t play their absolute hardest for all 27 outs, as the T-shirts preach? This is what happens. A benching.

“It was towering fly ball in the infield at first, probably had 15, 20 seconds of hangtime,” Renteria explained after the game. “I assumed the dropped ball. It has occurred. He could, at minimum, at least start moving that way.

“That’s uncharacteristic of him, to be honest, it truly is. Maybe he was just frustrated in that he had the fly ball and just stayed at the plate, but there was no movement toward first at all. And you guys have heard me talk to all the guys about at least giving an opportunity to move in that particular direction.

“Everybody says, ‘Well, 99 out of (100) times he’s going to catch that ball.’ And then that one time that he doesn’t, what would I do if the ball had been dropped? Would it have made it easier to pull him? Well, it was just as easy because you expect not the best, but the worst.

“That is uncharacteristic of that young man. I had a quick conversation with him on the bench, and he knew and that was it.”

It might seem a little overdramatic, a little nutty, even, to sit down a veteran catcher brought in this offseason to provide some offense and to do it in a one-run game. But this rebuild is about more than just waiting around for the minor league talent to make its way to the South Side. It’s about developing an organizational culture, too. And Renteria feels that if he lets this kind of thing slide at the big league level, that won’t send the right message to those precious prospects who will one day fill out this lineup.

“There’s one way to do it, you get your action, you start moving toward that direction in which you’ve got to go,” Renteria said. “What would’ve happened if everybody’s watching it — and I’m setting the tone for not only here, our club, (but also for) everybody in the minor leagues — and they’re saying, ‘Well, at the top, they said they’re going to do this and then they don’t do it.’

“It’s really simple. And people might like it, not like it. I’ve got to do this, do that so everybody understands what we’re trying to do here. We’re not done with what we’re trying to do.”

This isn’t the first time this has happened in 2018. Avisail Garcia was taken out of a game during spring training for not giving maximum effort. Leury Garcia was removed from a game earlier this month for not busting it down the first-base line on a weak grounder that went right to the first baseman.

It’s become a somewhat common tactic for Renteria, and while it might strike some as taking things a little too seriously, what good is this developmental season if a culture goes undeveloped? The White Sox have placed their bright future, in part, in Renteria’s hands, and they’ve talked glowingly about how the players have bought into his style and how the team played last season under his leadership.

If Renteria truly is the right man for the rebuild, things like this are how he’s going to establish his culture. And it will, he hopes, impact how all those prospects play when they’re no longer prospects and the White Sox are contending for championships.