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Playoff resolution coming in September?

Playoff discussions took a hit -- or, at least encountered a bump in the road -- last week when the BCS committee, composed of 11 conference commissioner’s and Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick, decided to hand the responsibility of choosing college football’s postseason to the BCS’ Presidential Oversight Committee.

The presidents/chancellors had the final say in the playoff conversation anyway, but instead of approving/denying one idea, the committee will now have “options” from which to choose. “Our job is just to narrow and refine the options,” Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott said last week.

Point is, don’t count on a decision of any kind in the next couple of weeks. Kirk Bohls of the Austin-American Statesman reports, citing sources, that the committee likely won’t decide on a playoff format until September because they will “have only four hours on June 26 in Washington, D.C., to digest, consider and approve one of the options handed them” by the BCS committee.

More from Bohls:

I’m told by an industry source that the Pac-12 and Big Ten feel that the SEC and Big 12 may be trying to ‘railroad through’ a four-team tournament, when the former two conferences are advocating a plus-one idea after the existing bowl games. “This thing is very fluid,he said. “These men are looking at this as their legacy.”

It should be noted that when playoff conversations first began earlier this year, the timeline to have a format finalized was the end of summer, so the fact that Bohls is throwing around a September deadline shouldn’t come as much of a surprise. The unexpected part was the BCS committee handing off the baton to the Presidential Oversight Committee for the final 100 meters.

By presenting the committee with several options, the BCS committee has acknowledged that all possibilities in varying degrees of probability are still on the table. Keep in mind that some of the presidents/chancellors on the oversight committee are far more conservative than their own conference commissioners.