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Byron Scott says clock started late, Jennings’ game-winner should not have counted

Washington Wizards v Cleveland Cavaliers

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 30: Head coach Byron Scott of the Cleveland Cavaliers reacts to an officials’ call during the second half against the Washington Wizards at Quicken Loans Arena on October 30, 2012 in Cleveland, Ohio. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)

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We showed you the game-winner from Brandon Jennings, an incredible launch from the top of the three-point arc with 0.7 seconds left to beat the Cavaliers as time expired.

Cleveland’s head coach, Byron Scott, was less excited about Jennings’ heroics than the rest of us. He told reporters afterward that the clock started late, so therefore the shot shouldn’t have counted.

From Jason Lloyd of the Akron Beacon Journal:

“I don’t want to get fined, so I’m not going to say anything about the clock starting late,” Cavs coach Byron Scott said. “They have to figure out a way to do something about that.”

“The bottom line is it doesn’t count or you take it out again,” Scott said. “Looking at it again in the locker room, the shot shouldn’t have counted.”

Told he might have crossed the line and might receive a fine from the league for criticizing officials, Scott responded “then too damn bad.”


Watching the replay a few more times, does Scott have a point? Maybe, but only in the sense that a human being being in that position has to wait for the ball to be touched by a player after it’s inbounded before hitting the button to start the clock, and that’s going to cause a split-second delay, however small it may be.

If the clock was started late -- and I’m not sure that it was -- it didn’t appear to be egregious or intentional. In a situation like this, complaining about it afterward just makes you look like a sore loser.

And, if you can’t have a defensive scheme in place to prevent an open look with less than a second left on the clock? To use Scott’s own words, then it is “too damn bad.”