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Cardinals president not happy with next Super Bowl host city

Bidwill

After the confetti comes to rest on Sunday night, the Super Bowl focus will shift to Arizona, where the 49th edition of the game will be played in early 2015.

In the opinion of Cardinals president Michael Bidwill, it’s getting late for the folks in Glendale, Arizona to get their act together.

Visiting Radio Row on Thursday, Bidwill complained about host city, including the inability of Glendale officials to lock in guaranteed prices for the hotels around University of Phoenix Stadium.

I think they’re acting very selfishly,” Bidwill said, via ESPN.com. “I think that you look at specifically the hotels out there, they’re just worried about their bottom line and that’s not the way great cities act. That’s not the way great leaders act. If people want to be big time and big cities, they’ve got to come together.”

Glendale’s reluctance to fully embrace the event could cause activities related to the Super Bowl to go elsewhere, with the NFL Experience likely landing in Phoenix.

“If there’s a city like Glendale that doesn’t want to participate, they’re going to lose out and all the activities will be going to the other cities that are participating,” Bidwill said. “In this instance, it’s going to be Phoenix and Scottsdale for the most part, and they’re great partners.

“The problem with Glendale all comes down to leadership and shortsightedeness, and it’s really disappointing but they think they’ve got it figured out and they really don’t. I think it’s selfish and they’ve done a poor job of planning and financially planning. They made a lot of really bad decisions and been proud about those decisions. Let them consider all those things.”

With more cold-weather cities having open-air stadiums emboldened by the likelihood of mild temperatures on Sunday, it could become even harder for reluctant cities like Glendale to get their act together when the times comes to submit competitive bids to host the Super Bowl in the future.

Or maybe the folks in Glendale are ahead of the curve, realizing that the privilege of hosting a Super Bowl is actually becoming a burden that, at the end of the day, doesn’t do much to help the bottom line.