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Will Mike Shula finally get NFL head-coaching consideration?

Cam Newton, Mike Shula

Cam Newton, Mike Shula

AP

When listing assistant coaches who could be NFL head coaches in 2016, names like Bears offensive coordinator Adam Gase and Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels sit near the top of the stack. One name has yet to crack the assistant coach “A” list.

Panthers offensive coordinator Mike Shula.

In early 2014, PFT made the case for Shula to be considered for the vacancy in Washington, given his work with Panthers quarterback Cam Newton. Carolina had just finished a 12-4 campaign, with the 11-1 finish after a 1-3 start sparked in large part by Shula’s decision to scour Newton’s film from Auburn in search of plays and concepts that would work.

Shula didn’t get any sniffs then, he wasn’t mentioned last year after a late-season surge carried the Panthers to a second straight NFC South title, and his name has come up recently only in connection with the University of Miami vacancy.

It’s unclear why Shula, who has helped transform a spread-offense, one-read, simplistic-playbook college quarterback into one of the best quarterbacks in the NFL, hasn’t gotten more attention. His father, Don, was one of the greatest coaches in NFL history. Mike Shula’s brother, David, was one of the worst of the last 25 years. And Mike had a shot with Alabama, but he was fired -- and he was followed by Nick Saban, who took the program back to its houndstooth heights.

Still, there’s a fundamental difference between coaching in college and coaching in the NFL. The pro game places a major premium on quarterback play, and with so many college quarterbacks not ready for the NFL, a guy who has accomplished what so few coaches can should at least be getting talked about as an NFL head coach.

Shula’s next chance to make a name for himself while carrying one of the most recognizable names in football comes later today, when the Panthers square off against the Cowboys. In past years, players like Randy Moss and Robert Griffin III have used that spot for coming-out parties.

This year, if/when (when) Newton is throwing touchdown passes and dancing in the end zone, maybe someone who will be looking for a head coach will at least make a note of Shula’s role in that process.