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One on one with the newest investors in the Portland Diamond Project: Russell Wilson and Ciara

One on one with the newest investors in the Portland Diamond Project: Russell Wilson and Ciara

The Portland Diamond Project (PDP) added some big names to its investment group over the weekend. Seattle Seahawks star quarterback Russell Wilson and his wife, Grammy Award-winning singer Ciara joined the group as owners/investors.

The PDP held a press conference on Saturday where Wilson said, “we’re excited about this opportunity. We’re excited about the potential of bringing a Major League Baseball team here to such a great city.”

Wilson and Ciara took a quick second after the press conference for an exclusive interview with our Dwight Jaynes to talk about the duo’s ambition to bring MLB to PDX. 

 

Brosius, MLB issue statements in wake of allegations made against Mike Trout

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IMAGN

Brosius, MLB issue statements in wake of allegations made against Mike Trout

In the wake of accusations made by the son former Yankees third baseman Scott Brosius against MVP outfielder Mike Trout, both David Brosius and Major League Baseball are setting the record straight. 

This comes on the heels of a story that appeared on this website, which brought to light an allegation of HGH use by the David Brosius made against Trout on social media. 

On Friday, Major League Baseball and the Baseball Players Association released a joint statement:

“Since the inception of the MLB-MLBPA Joint Drug Prevention Program, no major league or minor league player has ever received a therapeutic use exemption for, or otherwise received permission to use, Human Growth Hormone (HGH).”

The Angels issued a statement saying they “support the joint statement by Major League Baseball and the Major League Players Assn. regarding the therapeutic use exemptions.”

Brosius also walked back his accusation via social media.

I’d like to clear the air about a comment made earlier this week about Mike Trout potentially using HGH. The statement in question was taken from a conversation where I was explaining how there are certain situations in which actions that would usually be against the rules and considered cheating, are deemed okay for medical or other reasons, thus not cheating. The example I used of Mike Trout does not stem from information from my Dad or sources within the MLB and has no evidence behind it. I had no intention of this becoming an accusation against Mike Trout or causing the uproar it did. Mike Trout has been the face of MLB for good reason, as he is an amazing player and even better example for baseball players like myself. I would like to sincerely apologize to him and his family for the unfair statement I made and the negative fallout it has had on them. No criticism or skepticism should be pointed at him, it should all be at me. I had a lapse in judgment when posting the comment and have learned my lesson on how powerful and dangerous social media can be.

Trout, who signed a 12-year, $430 million contract with the Angels, has never been suspended for a failed drug test throughout his career. The Angels outfielder has earned eight All-Star Game nominations, seven Silver Slugger Awards, and three American League MVP trophies in his nine years as a professional baseball player.

 

Scott Brosius' son, David, accuses Mike Trout of taking HGH, finding loophole

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IMAGN

Scott Brosius' son, David, accuses Mike Trout of taking HGH, finding loophole

Major League Baseball... is burning. 

Caught up in one of the biggest cheating scandals to ever rock the league, it appears some would prefer to see the entire baseball world scorched. 

In recent days, MLB managers AJ Hinch, Alex Cora and Carlos Beltran have all lost their jobs because of a scheme devised by the Houston Astros that uses trash cans and video cameras to send out signals to hitters.

To pour gasoline on the fire even more, the latest rumor about one of the MLB's best players could bring the league to its knees. 

David Brosius, son of former Seattle Mariners third base coach Scott Brosius, accused Trout of taking human growth hormone for a "thyroid" issue in what are now deleted comments on Instagram. 

David Brosius, who was a baseball player himself, a left hand pitcher who spent one season at Oregon State before transferring to Linfield, also deleted his Instagram account in the wake of the social media comments he made.

NBCSNW cannot independently confirm the authenticity of the now deleted account. 

Scott Brosius, who was born in Hillsboro, Oregon and attended both Rex Putnam High School and Linfield College, played for the Oakland A's and New York Yankees. He's a three-time World Champion, a Gold Glove winner and was inducted into the Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 2005. He became head coach at Linfield in 2008 and was named Northwest Conference coach of the year five times (2008, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2014). In 2013, Brosius' team won Linfield's first NCAA national baseball championship. 

In addition to confirming the now public cheating scandal that has shaken the MLB to its core, Scott's son, David, threw out the unsubstantiated claim that, true or not, carries equally harmful implications. 

"If you want to read something better, Mike Trout takes HGH for a 'thyroid' condition," Brosius wrote on Instagram. "It's a loophole he found and the MLB doesn't make it public because they don't want fans knowing their best player is on HGH. But people within know..."

Trout has never been suspended for a failed drug test throughout his career. The Angels outfielder has earned eight All-Star Game nominations, seven Silver Slugger Awards, and three American League MVP trophies in his nine years as a professional baseball player. 

The claims are unconfirmed and baseless, but David's close family ties (his dad) to the Mariners 3rd Base Coach is enough to get people's attention. 


So, to recap...


Ugh, not Yelich, too...

MLB may force other sports to follow its lead in drug testing, treatment

MLB may force other sports to follow its lead in drug testing, treatment

Major League Baseball hit a home run yesterday.

MLB, in concert with its players association, announced Thursday it has updated its drug policy, with testing for cocaine and opioids beginning in spring training and marijuana no longer on the banned substance list.

And the best part of the change is that failed tests will now be met with treatment plans, rather than just punishment. Players will be punished only if they violate prescribed treatment plans.

It sounds like the most sensible approach to drug testing in all of sports.

Tyler Skaggs, a pitcher for the Los Angeles Angels, died of an opioid overdose last July and there is little doubt that this policy change is at least in part due to the recognition that opioid abuse has become a serious societal problem. Skaggs died with fentanyl, oxycodone and alcohol in his system.

“It is our collective hope that this agreement will help raise public awareness on the risks and dangers of opioid medications and contribute positively to a national conversation about this important topic,” said Dan Halem, M.L.B.’s deputy commissioner for baseball administration and chief legal officer, in a statement.

MLB will now test for opioids, cocaine, fentanyl and synthetic THC. It’s been apparent for a few years now that the sports leagues have lost the battle over marijuana, with the substance now legal in many areas of the country and to officially back off on testing for it is the correct move.

This surely will apply pressure to other leagues to implement the same sort of policy, including the elimination of marijuana from the banned-substance list.

Tampa Bay/Montreal deal stalled... what it could mean for MLB to Portland

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USATI

Tampa Bay/Montreal deal stalled... what it could mean for MLB to Portland

On Wednesday, it was revealed that negotiations stalled to split the Tampa Bay Rays home games between Tampa Bay and Montreal. Now, the organization has decided to honor their agreement with Tropicana Field and remain in Florida until 2027, announced in a letter from St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman addressed to City Council.

However, once the agreement ends the Rays will most likely be moving away from the area and playing in a different market. Evidenced by the organization declining Kriseman’s offer to extend their deal beyond 2027. Last season, despite making the postseason, the Tampa Bay Rays were second to last in Major League Baseball in average attendance.

This could be positive news for supporters of the Portland Diamond Project, an organization dedicated to bringing Major League Baseball to Portland. With the Rays’ decision, it appears a MLB franchise will be looking to relocate and Portland may be able to host the team. 

Back in November 2018, the Diamond Project announced an agreement with the Port of Portland to develop Terminal 2 property as an eventual site for the stadium. 

Investors for the property include Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson, Nike, and more. Also, the petition to bring Major League Baseball to Portland has reached over 44,000 signatures.

Wouldn't it be cool to see something like this happening in Portland? 


One can only hope. 

Get to know Huskies new head coach Jimmy Lake

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Jimmy Lake/Twitter

Get to know Huskies new head coach Jimmy Lake

The University of Washington sports world was shaken Monday after it was announced that head football coach Chris Petersen would step down following the team's bowl game. 

In the process, UW promoted defensive coordinator Jimmy Lake to take over.

Here are five things maybe you didn't know about the Huskies new head coach.

  • Lake was an honorable mention All-Big Sky and academic all-conference honoree at Eastern Washington as a strong safety and was a graduate of North Central High in Spokane, WA. Lake and his wife, Michelle, have three children: Jimmy Jr., Faith and Bronson.
  • Lake began his coaching career at EWU in 1999 and spent time at Montana State and in the NFL (Tampa Bay and Detroit) before joining Petersen at Boise State in 2012.
  • Lake previously served as an assistant at UW under Keith Gilbertson in 2004 and returned to Seattle as the defensive backs coach in 2014. He was promoted to co-defensive coordinator before the 2016 season and to defensive coordinator in 2018.
  • From 2015 through 2018, Washington's defense led the Pac-12 in both total defense and scoring defense all four years. Eight former Husky defensive backs coached by Lake are currently on NFL rosters.
  • This is Lake’s first head coaching job. According to Steve Berkowitz of USA Today, Lake’s contract is for five years with an annual salary of $3 million. “I could not be more excited about taking over as head football coach at the University of Washington,” said Jimmy Lake in a press release. “I’ve been dreaming of this opportunity for as long as I can remember and I can’t think of a better place to do it than in the world-class city of Seattle and at such a prestigious university with a rich football tradition. This wouldn’t be possible without the mentorship of Coach Petersen and I would like to thank him for everything he has done for me, as well as Jen Cohen for entrusting me with this opportunity.”

Central Catholic, Lake Oswego punch ticket to 6A football championship

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OSAA

Central Catholic, Lake Oswego punch ticket to 6A football championship

And then there were two!

The Central Catholic Rams cruised to a 35-7 win over Barlow at Hillsboro Stadium to punch their ticket to the the 6A football final.

Running back Elijah Elliott ran for three touchdowns, all of which came in the second half, and finished his day with 151 yards, including a 77-yarder in the fourth quarter.

Here's postgame reaction from Central Catholic's victory:

Lake Oswego punched their ticket into the 6A football championship with a 28-21 win over the Jesuit Crusaders in the evening match-up at Hillsboro Stadium. 

Casey Filkins, who spent most of the season at tailback, played QB for the fourth playoff game where he rushed for 110 yards on 30 carries and completed 13 of 27 passes for 225 yards and one score with one interception.

Filkins accounted for all three of Lake Oswego’s first-half touchdowns. Senior Thomas Dukart had eight catches for 170 yards in the win. 

“You can’t really put a game like this to words,” Casey Filkins said postgame. “But, we’re not satisfied.”

Lake Oswego has the opportunity to go back to back years with a state title.

Watch the Lakers postgame reaction:

Poppycock! Legislators uneasy with losses in Oregon's sports betting app

Poppycock! Legislators uneasy with losses in Oregon's sports betting app

Apparently, it seems, some of our state legislators are upset and surprised about the sums of money people are wagering – and losing -- in the state’s new online sports betting app, "Scoreboard." State Representative Paul Evans (D-Monmouth) is one of them:

But since then, the lottery established a limit that Evans and other critics think is no limit at all: $250,000.

Evans says that's irresponsible. "I think that's absolute poppycock," he says. "Two hundred fifty thousand dollars is the price of a low-end home. I think that's a joke."

The limit has the attention of other legislators, too.

"That's way beyond what we should be letting people bet," says Sen. Chuck Riley (D-Hillsboro).

Lottery officials say Scoreboard is exceeding expectations: More than 30,000 players signed up in the first month, betting more than $13 million. The largest single bet so far is $10,000, and one player bet a total of $234,015, losing $12,750.

I think our elected folks in Salem must be just a little on the naïve side. Yes, if you legalize betting and put it on an app you can use on your phone, more people will gamble. And those people may just bet substantial sums of money because it’s so easy.

But if a player wagered a total of $234,015 since this thing began, it’s not a huge sum – nor is his percentage of losses, at $12,750. In the world of sports betting, people tend to wager with their hearts as well as their minds. They get carried away. I’m not a fan of that and don’t wager on sports. But a $250,000 limit? It's usually only going to impact somebody with enough money to lose $250,000.

But I will say this, they’ve probably been betting illegally, anyway, and now, at least, the state gets a portion of it. And there is a control, in that you make bets based on how much money is in your account and when that money runs out, you can’t bet. So, at least in that scenario, nobody is going to get his or her leg broken because they didn’t pay their bookie.

The outcry in the legislature amuses me. I mean, did they think people wouldn’t lose? Did they think they could stop people from becoming addicated to gambling any more than they can stop them from becoming addicted to alcohol?

That’s so Oregon. Next thing you know, the state will attempt to pay them all back for their losses.

And that, of course, would be poppycock.

Headstrong: Seattle Sounders Stefan Frei emphasizes that everyone should find their passion

Headstrong: Seattle Sounders Stefan Frei emphasizes that everyone should find their passion

The month of November is Men's Health Awareness Month. ‘The Movember Foundation’ uses November to bring awareness to various men’s physical and mental health issues, as well as support to those tackling prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health, and more.

Throughout this month, NBC Sports will be releasing numerous videos that feature sports superstars discussing the importance of mental health as well as how they approach the subject. Seattle Sounders goalkeeper Stefan Frei, who recently hoisted the Philip F. Anschutz Trophy over his head as an MLS Champion, was one such athlete that participated in the nationwide project.

The mental side of prepping as a goalie— you will have nerves, butterflies. It’s a good thing you have butterflies. It means you care, you’re engaged. Mentally, it’s not a turn on, turn off deal. It’s a constant battle. I think that’s why if you don’t deal with it properly, it can add up, and  it can destroy you if you don’t deal with it.

Frei recently shared his love for art and uses it to express himself, but also, decompress. 

“It’s always been a passion of mine, growing up. It’s always been something I’ve enjoyed doing. As a goalkeeper, I don’t get to enjoy being creative, too much.”

And while a mistake on the soccer pitch can be costly, Frei opens himself up to making mistakes on a canvas. 

“For me, art, as difficult it is to surrender, if I do make mistakes, it can actually lead to something beautiful. It’s kind of like an exploration, and there is no wrong."

Frei emphasizes that finding something you’re passionate about is paramount to a happier and healthier life.

“When you have an injury, you get treatment. But, we do so many things beforehand to prevent injuries. Mentally, there needs to be something there, as well.”

You can watch the full video above.

Social Media reacts: Seattle Sounders win the MLS Cup

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USATI

Social Media reacts: Seattle Sounders win the MLS Cup

It's time to celebrate in Seattle.

For the second time in four seasons, the Seattle Sounders have won the MLS Cup. This time in front of a franchise record 69,274 fans in the franchise's first final played at CenturyLink Field. After an ugly first half, the Sounders owned the second half to win the game 3-1. 

You can read our instant analysis here.

Let’s take you through the game and how social media reacted.

Kelvin Leerdam (57’)

To end the scoreless tie, Kelvin Leerdam’s shot ricocheted off a Toronto FC defender into the back of the net. It would have been the fourth own goal in MLS history, but the league deemed it not one. Watch below and see for yourself.

Here’s how the Seattle faithful reacted to Leerdam breaking through.

Victor Rodríguez (76’)

To break the game wide open, Rodríguez would fire a laser into the bottom right corner of the net to create a two-goal advantage.

Social media could sense the championship.

Raúl Ruidíaz (90’)

Not to be outdone, the Sounders' star would get a goal of his own to add to the sheet.

Now Seattle knew it was over. Here’s how they celebrated.