Oregon Ducks

Brenden Schooler and Taj Griffin trying out new positions

Brenden Schooler and Taj Griffin trying out new positions

Oregon coach Willie Taggart this morning stated that sophomore Brenden Schooler, who started 10 games at safety last season, will move to wide receiver, at least for now.

Also, junior running back Taj Griffin said he will practice some at slot receiver. 

"Yeah, we're going to put Schooler over there, and see what he can do," Taggart said today. "Yesterday we let him run a couple routes and he looked pretty good."

Sophomore quarterback Justin Herbert welcomed the addition to wide receiver.

"He's super athletic," he said. "He's really good on both sides of the ball and I'm glad to have him on our side of the ball."

Schooler faces stiff competition to remain in the mix at safety this year. Redshrt freshman Brady Breeze and true freshman Billy Gibson made strong impressions last spring.  Plus, the Ducks return redshirt senior Tyree Robinson, who played a lot of cornerback last season after starting at primarily playing safety in the past, and redshirt junior Khalil Oliver. Both veterans have the inside track to start. Senior Juwaan Williams is also competing.

"We are just going to find out the best position for all of our players and make sure we put them in the best position to help the football team," Taggart said. 

The addition of freshman Thomas Graham Jr. at cornerback, where he could start opposite senior Arrion Springs, has allowed Robinson to return to safety, creating more of a logjam there.  

True freshman safety Deommodore Lenoir, the No. 1-rated athlete in the nation according to Rivals.com, could also push for playing time at safety. 

"He's done a great job for us," Taggart said. 

Griffn's case is an interesting one. The Ducks return their top three backs from last season, senior Royce Freeman, redshirt junior Tony Brooks-James and redshirt senior Kani Benoit. Plus, Oregon has added three freshmen running backs that have impressed Taggart so far.

"I think we have some pretty good young running backs," Taggart said.

Griffin, the No. 4 back last season, injured his knee midway through the year and missed last spring. He returns to find a glut of running backs but a thin receiving depth chart. 

With Griffin's speed and elusiveness, he could be used as a slot receiver. However, Oregon returns senior starter Charles Nelson, and freshman Darrian McNeal figures to be the backup slot receiver. Plus, the Ducks have four other freshmen receivers on the roster, including Jaylon Redd and Johnny Johnson III. 

Still, Griffin is special with the ball in his hands and at the very least should see time at receiver or running back in situations designed to get the ball into his hands. 

Oregon forward Troy Brown selected 15th overall by Washington Wizards

Oregon forward Troy Brown selected 15th overall by Washington Wizards

Oregon freshman forward Troy Brown was selected 15th overall by the Washington Wizards in the 2018 NBA Draft.

Brown is a 6’7” 215lbs forward who averaged 11.3 ppg, 4.2 rpg, and 1.4 apg last season.

Brown earned Pac-12 All-Freshman honorable mention. He will turn 19 years old on July 28th.

Fun Fact: Both of Brown’s parents were college athletes at Texas A&M – Kingsville. His mother ran track, while his dad played basketball.

What CBS sports had to say about Troy Brown: "Brown is a wild card in the draft. He was a blue-chip recruit out of high school, but was no more than a bit player at Oregon. But similar to Jaylen Brown coming out of Cal, he has the ideal size and athleticism to mesh perfectly in the NBA that is becoming increasingly more positionless." 

For more on how Brown's game will translate at the next level check out the video above with Jamie Hudson and Aaron Fentress. 

Via Jason Quick: Oregon's Troy Brown: point guard trapped inside a wing's body

Former Ducks football player Fotu Leiato killed in car accident

uohelmet.jpg
USATI

Former Ducks football player Fotu Leiato killed in car accident

The Eugene Police Department confirmed to KEZI News in Eugene that former Oregon Football linebacker Fotu Leiato was killed in a rollover car accident earlier this morning. 

Leiato was dismissed from the Oregon football program in May, following his second arrest of the year (April) on charges of theft, criminal trespassing, and criminal mischief. This was compounded by charges from January for misdemeanor trespassing. Leiato had 14 tackels as a linebacker for the Ducks during the 2017 season. 

More on this story as it develops. 

Fotu Leiato from the Oregon Athletic Website is pictured below:

Creighton Athletics Hall of Fame to induct Dana Altman and Kyle Korver

usatsi_9971088.jpg
USATI

Creighton Athletics Hall of Fame to induct Dana Altman and Kyle Korver

Creighton University sent the following out Wednesday morning:

The Creighton University Athletics Hall of Fame will add a pair of all-time greats to its ranks on Saturday, August 25th at the Marriott Capitol District Hotel in Omaha.

This year's inductees in the 51st Hall of Fame class are Dana Altman and Kyle Korver.

Altman was head men's basketball coach at Creighton from 1994-2010, and remains the program's all-time wins leader with a 327-176 mark. He took the Bluejays to 13 postseasons, including seven NCAA Tournaments. The Wilber, Neb., native was named Missouri Valley Conference Coach of the Year in 2001 and 2002, and in 2007 named an All-Time Coach on the MVC's All-Centennial Team. He still owns MVC coaching records with 13 consecutive postseasons, 11 straight 20-win seasons, 13 straight years of 10+ league wins, 288 league games coached and six Arch Madness titles.
 
Altman is entering his ninth year as head coach at the University of Oregon, and led the Ducks to the 2017 Final Four. He owns a 743-350 career record in 33 overall seasons as a head coach, which also includes stops at Southeast Junior College (1982-83), Moberly Junior College (1983-86), Marshall (1989-90) and Kansas State (1990-94). He is one of six active Division I coaches with 21 consecutive winning seasons, joining Mike Krzyzewski, Tom Izzo, Roy Williams, Bill Self and Jim Boeheim.

Korver competed at Creighton from 1999-2003, and remains the only men's basketball player in program history to play in four NCAA Tournaments. He was a consensus Second Team All-American as a senior, when he was named the Midseason National Player of the Year by ESPN's Dick Vitale. Korver was a two-time Valley regular-season and tournament MVP and inducted into the MVC's Hall of Fame in 2010. He remains the Creighton and MVC record holder with 371 career three-pointers made, and still ranks in the top-10 in CU history with 819 three-point attempts (first), 89.1 percent free throw percentage (first), 45.3 percent marksmanship from three-point range (third), 172 steals (fifth) and 1,801 career points (sixth).

Korver was the 51st overall pick in the 2003 NBA Draft and has played with the Philadelphia 76ers, Utah Jazz, Chicago Bulls, Atlanta Hawks and Cleveland Cavaliers during a 15-year professional career. He is the only player to lead the NBA in three-point percentage four times, and he ranks fourth in NBA history with 2,213 career three-pointers, sixth with 43.1 percent shooting from three-point range and 16th with 88.1 percent accuracy from the free throw line.

The Creighton Athletics Hall of Fame contains 84 inductees, plus the 1991 Creighton Baseball Team. It started in 1968 with the induction with Bob Gibson, and features 31 former Bluejay men's basketball coaches and student-athletes.

The Saturday, August 25 event will commence with a social hour at 6 p.m., with the dinner and program to follow at 7 p.m. Tickets to the event are $100 per person or $1,000 for a table of 10. For former Creighton student-athletes and their immediate families, tickets are $75 per person. Reservations can be made online at: http://www.gocreighton.com/athleticevents . For more information about the event, contact Margaret Bennett by phone at 402-280-5577 or by e-mail at mbennett@creighton.edu.

Oregon Ducks Softball season comes to an unexpected early end

screen_shot_2018-06-04_at_10.59.19_am.png
UO Softball

Oregon Ducks Softball season comes to an unexpected early end

It wasn't the end to the season anyone envisioned for the Oregon Ducks who came into the NCAA College Softball World Series with a #1 ranking. Their Championship hopes were dashed this weekend by #5 Washington and #6 Florida State. The two losses ousted the Ducks from the double elimination tournament. 

Here's a quick look around Twitter following the elimination:

 

The loss that could win it all for Oregon softball

img_7210.jpg
NBCSNW staff

The loss that could win it all for Oregon softball

Let’s rewind the clock to Thursday night. No. 1 Oregon softball hosting the No. 16 Kentucky Wildcats in game one of Super Regionals in front of a sellout crowd at Jane Sanders Stadium. Pac-12 Pitcher of the Year Megan Kleist calmly and cooly strikes out the first Wildcats batter, and all was right in Eugene, OR. But things took a turn real quick. Kentucky came to play and came away with a 9-6 victory over the home-town favorites to take game one of this best-of-three series vs. Oregon.

A gut-check for the Ducks. An unnerving feeling settling in. One more loss from not advancing to nationals. A must-win the next night. 

With a “backs against the wall” mentality, Oregon dug in and did not phase one bit. The Ducks went on to win 6-1 Friday evening and then an 11-1 run-rule win today to advance once again to the College World Series. 

The Ducks learned two very important lessons that Friday night that just may pay off in Oklahoma City, home of the WCWS. The first: what it feels like to lose. The second: how to bounce back from it.

The Ducks now have a taste of what it feels like to lose at this level of play, face adversity, and fight with their backs against the wall. Yes, the Ducks had three conference losses earlier in the season. But the Ducks have not experienced a loss at this caliber. Not with the season on the line and the possibility of not playing one more game.

“This is probably the best time that it could happen to us as a team,” said Oregon senior DJ Sanders on the timing of Thursday night’s loss. “Even during regionals, I don’t think we played as well as we should have or could have. So we thought, ‘ok maybe this is the wake up call we need to come out and play like we know we can or how we should be,’ so really the first game was probably the wake up call that we needed.”

“Certainly I think every team has a gut-check,” said Oregon coach Mike White. “…It happens a lot. You either got to persevere in those moments and come back and believe in what you’re doing or you go home. And so I think the finale of all, this team stepped up and that’s what you got to do, have to do.”

We learn more from our mistakes than we do our successes, and for the Oregon Ducks, those lessons, how to look adversity in the face and overcome it, may just punch a ticket into the national championship.

Backs against the wall, Oregon softball shows no fear

img_3190.jpg
NBCSNW staff

Backs against the wall, Oregon softball shows no fear

Backs against the wall, feathers ruffled, a must-win situation, Oregon softball had quite the test in front of them Friday night in front of a sell out crowd at Jane Sanders stadium. In the biggest test of their season, the Ducks are in a win or go home situation down 0-1 in a best-of-three series to the No. 16 Kentucky Wildcats in NCAA Super-Regionals. After giving up nine runs on 10 hits in last night’s loss, many wondered how and if the Ducks would bounce back because Oregon had not been put in a situation like this all season long.

The Ducks haven’t given up that many runs since playing at the Arizona Wildcats in April 2017.

It was a different story tonight. Oregon came in focused, fired up, feeling good, and defeated the Wildcats 6-1.

“Just a much better overall performance, especially defensively. We made some big plays,” said Oregon coach Mike White. “You could tell we were fighting for our lives. That’s what we had to do with our backs up against the wall. I was really proud of our team… hopefully tomorrow we can do the same thing.”

“It was there and I didn’t want it to be,” said senior infielder Jenna Lilley on dropping the first game vs. Kentucky. “You have to acknowledge that that’s the reality of it and what we’re playing for to keep our season going. So definitely the thought was there but do everything we can to not let that happen.”

Freshmen sensation and home-town kid Lauren Burke has not phased a bit in her first postseason play as a collegiate player. Burke, from Marist High School here in Eugene, Oregon, has batted 5-for-6 with seven RBI’s and two homers this postseason.

But this is not over quite yet. One down, one to go. Oregon softball must have back-to-back wins over the Wildcats to advance to the college World Series. One more game tomorrow evening, 6 PM, and Jane Sanders stadium.

Will the same team that came in focused in game two repeat itself in game three? Or will the momentum swing back to Kentucky’s side as it did in game one? Softball fans are in for a real treat tomorrow night with a trip to nationals on the line.

 

Oregon softball shakin’, not stirred

img_7141.jpg
NBCSNW Staff

Oregon softball shakin’, not stirred

Four errors. Nine runs given up. 10 hits allowed… a rather uncharacteristic night for the No. 1 seeded Oregon Ducks in round one of the NCAA Super Regionals. The No. 16 Kentucky Wildcats, coming off run-ruling all three of their opponents last weekend, the bats were hot and junior Pac-12 Pitcher of the Year Megan Kleist was tested early and often. Kleist did not seem like her usual self, and besides striking out the first Kentucky batter, had a rough first inning giving up a three-run homer to Wilcats' ace hitter Abbey Cheek.

The Ducks offense did manage to put up six runs on the night, but the defense did not hold giving up four errors on bad throws.

“We know our backs are up against the wall right now,” said coach Mike White following the game. “It makes it pretty simple: we have to come out and win otherwise our season is done. I thought our team fought hard, we never gave up, we battled until the last out, unfortunately it didn’t work out today. Hopefully tomorrow it can be a different story.”

Oregon will face a do or die situation tomorrow in this best-of-three series with the Wildcats already down 0-1. 

“Kentucky, I give them a lot of credit, they came in here and they came to play. So like coach says, pretty simple, you win or you don’t,” said senior catcher Gwen Svekis.

Oregon must flush this game and move on. Focus on the task at hand, do all the little things right, and flat out win tomorrow. With their backs against the wall, how will this team respond? 

“Now, it’s what we do tomorrow and the next day that matter the most,” said White. “How are we going to bounce back? Sure we had a bad game, but if we want to be the national champions and be the number one team in the country, we need to be able to come back from this. Plenty of teams have done it before. We need to be fired up and come out and play a better game.”

Oregon softball has both the steak and the sizzle

usatsi_9882574.jpg
USA Today Kelvin Kuo

Oregon softball has both the steak and the sizzle

The No. 1 overall seeded Oregon Ducks are built on a foundation of experience. Players like seniors Gwen Svekis, Jenna Lilley, and Lauren Lindvall who have been in the national tournament before. Post-season success relies on experience such as this. But it doesn’t stop there for the Ducks.

Coach Mike White and his staff have made quiet the effort in terms of recruiting and can be seen with the electric underclassmen on this Oregon roster. 

For starters, first baseman Mia Camuso was second on the team last year with 47 RBI’s. Camuso is just a sophomore. Outfielder Shannon Rhodes made her name known last season with her powerful hitting, also just a sophomore. Haley Cruse finds herself sitting higher in the batting order this year in post-season play, combined with her speed, rounds out this impressive sophomore class. 

Two freshmen in particular really jump off the roster. Local kid Lauren Burke out of Marist High School, Eugene, Oregon, hit a two-run homer in the Ducks’ first game vs. U Albany to boost Oregon into round two of the NCAA Eugene regionals. Backing up senior Svekis behind the plate is freshman Mary Iakopo, who looks as confident as ever behind the plate, has a deadly arm, and a threat at bat as well.

Speaking on the freshman and sophomore class, coach White said, "They are putting a lot of pressure on the upperclassmen... we are loding a great senior class and that next class has to be ready to go... That's what we try to do: to have depth."

This roster has potential all-around, but the most solid group of all has to be on the mound. Pick your poison between Pac-12 Pitcher of the Year junior Megan Kleist and sophomore stud Miranda Elish, both with ERA’s under 1. On top of that, sophomore Maggie Balint proved last season as just a freshman that she can make quiet the impact as well. Elish and Kleist allowed zero runs over the course of regionals weekend.

The Oregon Ducks await the winner of the Lexington region to be played next weekend in super-regionals.

After 'OK' season with Ducks, Troy Brown thinks he is ready for NBA

After 'OK' season with Ducks, Troy Brown thinks he is ready for NBA

CHICAGO –Troy Brown’s only season at the University of Oregon didn’t go as he planned.  Not only did the team not make the NCAA Tournament, the heralded wing was only good, and not great, on the court.

Even so, after averaging 11.3, 6.2 rebounds and 3.2 assists for the Ducks, Brown said he saw enough in himself to declare for the NBA Draft.

“I would say it was OK,’’ he said of his freshman season in Eugene. “It wasn’t the best year, or the year I wanted. Every kid dreams of going to college and being the star player, but we all go through our ups and downs, and it’s one of those things I learned from, and I feel I matured from.’’

He said he feels the up-and-down tempo of the NBA will better suit his offensive game and complement his defensive versatility. NBA scouts seem to agree as Brown is projected to be a mid-to-late first round selection.

“I can do everything on the court,’’ Brown said. “I feel like I can score the ball really well, but at Oregon that wasn’t my (role). We had a lot of guys who could put the ball in the hoop. I was more of a glue guy, and I was ok with that. I was fine just showing my versatility and doing the hard stuff - rebounding, guarding the best player, diving for loose balls and stuff like that.’’ 

The 6-foot-7 Brown appears to be the type of hybrid player that is becoming valued in today’s NBA game – long, athletic and able to guard several positions. The knock on his game – his outside shooting – has been a point of emphasis in his predraft workouts. 

“The more repetitions, the better,’’ Brown said. 

He said he is embracing the undefined nature of what position he will play in the NBA, noting that the league is trending more toward positionless basketball. 

“I feel like coming out of college everybody sees me as a small forward, but I can still make my way up to whatever position my coach needs me to do to get the W,’’ Brown said. “That’s what I’m willing to do.’