Oregon Ducks

Oregon-Oregon State no longer using "Civil War" name for its sports rivalry games

Oregon-Oregon State no longer using "Civil War" name for its sports rivalry games

Since 1894, the Ducks and Beavers have squared off on the gridiron in a battle for bragging rights in the state of Oregon. The rivalry, known as the Civil War, is the state’s most anticipated sporting event. 

While the timeless tradition between the two archnemeses will continue for years to come, it’s colloquial name will be no longer.

Per a release on Friday, the University of Oregon and Oregon State University has mutually agreed to no longer refer to the rivalry as “Civil War.” The decision is effective immediately and will begin with all athletic competitions in the 2020-21 season.

Today’s announcement is not only right but is a long time coming, and I wish to thank former Duck great Dennis Dixon for raising the question and being the catalyst for change. Thanks also to our current student-athletes for their leadership and input during this process. We must all recognize the power of words and the symbolism associated with the Civil War. This mutual decision is in the best interests of both schools, and I would like to thank Scott Barnes for his diligence as we worked through this process. We look forward to our continued and fierce in-state rivalry with Oregon State in all sports. -- Oregon Director of Athletics Rob Mullens

[Be sure to download and listen for free Sports Uncovered: The uniform craze that revolutionized college football]

Oregon State President Ed Ray said changing the name was overdue, as “it represents a connection to a war fought to perpetuate slavery.”

While not intended as reference to the actual Civil War, OSU sports competition should not provide any misconstrued reference to this divisive episode in American history. That we did not act before to change the name was a mistake. We do so now, along with other important actions to advance equal opportunity and justice for all and in recognition that Black Lives Matter. -- Oregon State President Ed Ray

Former Beavers Steven Jackson and Ken Simonton are among prominent athletes to speak out about the rivalry's former name and will play a crucial role in the process of selecting a new name for the Oregon-Oregon State rivalry. 

Two-time Super Bowl champion and former Duck Dennis Dixon shed light on how the name change came into play. 

"I am happy to see two universities coming together to drive change, an everlasting change. I'm excited to be part of this change," Dixon said in a video. 

The 124th annual football game will continue to be played Nov. 28 at Reser Stadium in Corvallis. The two schools have competed in men’s basketball a record 354 times. 

Why a college football ‘bubble’ would 100 percent work

Why a college football ‘bubble’ would 100 percent work

The NBA, WNBA, MLS and NWSL have proven that life in the ‘bubble’ isn’t so bad.

In fact, just the opposite. The players, coaches and team personnel are making good choices inside a safe environment while continuing along their seasons while the rest of the world is trying to navigate uncharted waters that is the coronavirus pandemic.  

At first, the concept of a bubble was sort of laughable: no duos for ping-pong; separated lockers in the locker roos; designating walking paths… but you can’t argue the results. Zero positive tests of COVID within the bubble.

[Listen and download for free ‘Sports Uncovered: The uniform craze that revolutionized college football].

Now with the college football world in a hiatus and lacking the necessary leadership it needs, two of the five Power 5 conferences have cancelled their 2020 fall sports season while the other three have released new conference-only schedules starting in late September.

For those two Power 5 conferences - Pac-12 and Big Ten - who have pushed all athletic activity back to January 1, would the concept of a bubble work in college football?

100 percent yes.

SiriusXM Pac12 Radio Host Mike Yam joined host Jordan Kent on the latest Talkin’ Ducks Podcast to discuss the potential and 

I think the NBA has shown the only model that is successful when it comes to athletics is that bubble… on a college campus, right now, this is an optimal time and that’s why you can point to low testing numbers in the Pac-12 conference for a lot of these student-athletes… The bigger question is what happens when you have thousands of kids… congregating in one location. — Mike Yam

As the college football world was spinning out of control and rumors flying off the shelves before any decisions on 2020 were made, the players attempted to salvage the fall season and sway the decision-making in their favor through the #WeAreUnited and #WeWantToPlay movements. 

Players were making the case that they would feel safer on campus, getting tested constantly and being around others that were doing the same. Just look at what professional sports and specifically NFL is doing, through constant testing, nose swabs, drawing blood, social distancing, and wearing masks even through workouts and walk-throughs.

Oregon Athletic Director Rob Mullens jumped on a Zoom call with members of local media Thursday morning and weighed in on the potential bubble:

Our student-athletes - football included - that were here over the summer that we on-boarded did a phenomenal job and our testing results showed that. They really embraced the protocols. The culture that our coaches have built, Mario [Cristobal] has done a phenomenal job. Our medical team did an amazing job. And our student-athletes really embraced and understood what it would take to really stay safe and give us the best chance of advancing through what went through to voluntary workouts then expanded to more meetings and then walk-throughs… — Rob Mullens 

[RELATED]: Report: Nine Oregon Ducks students tested positive for COVID-19

A bubble can work. The Pac-12 and Big Ten will just have to wait until January 1 to find out.

Oregon, Oregon State players weigh-in on Pac-12 decision to cancel football season

Oregon, Oregon State players weigh-in on Pac-12 decision to cancel football season

It was the news we knew we’d likely hear, but it didn’t make us anymore prepared for it. 

The Pac-12 football season is canceled

Pac-12 leaders voted unanimously Tuesday to postpone all sports through the end of the year, the conference announced.

“The health, safety and well-being of our student-athletes and all those connected to Pac-12 sports has been our number one priority since the start of this current crisis,” said Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott.  “Our student-athletes, fans, staff and all those who love college sports would like to have seen the season played this calendar year as originally planned, and we know how disappointing this is.”

Impacted Pac-12 student athletes will continue to have their scholarships guaranteed, but that doesn’t make the news much more comforting for student-athletes. 

Oregon and Oregon State players took to social media to voice their reactions to the announcement.  

[Listen and download for free ‘Sports Uncovered: The uniform craze that revolutionized college football].

Some players like Ducks cornerback Dontae Manning took a more optimistic approach to the decision.  

Others had jokes. 

There are some positives right, everyone wins? 

The Pac-12 hopes to resume sport competition in spring 2021, but have not announced any specific plans.

[Listen to the latest Talkin’ Ducks Podcast with host Jordan Kent and special guest Oregon women’s basketball head coach Kelly Graves].

[Listen to the latest Talkin' Beavers Podcast with host Ron Callan and special guest former Oregon State women's basketball guard Mikayla Pivec].

Why now? How the Pac-12 came to cancel the fall 2020 CFB season

Why now? How the Pac-12 came to cancel the fall 2020 CFB season

The Pac-12 conference unanimously voted to postpone all athletic competition into 2021, including the 2020 college football season.

[RELATED]: Breaking: Pac-12 unanimously cancels 2020 college football, fall sports

How did we get here?

The COVID-19 pandemic has been wreaking havoc throughout the nation since March but college football had been considering many various plans leading up to the 2020 college football season.

In a press conference following the decision, Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott said that cancelling the season was not the first option considered. 

“We’ve got scenario A,B,C,D, and E. We moved from scenario A to B when we went to a conference-only schedule," said Scott. 

The Pac-12 went to an all-conference schedule in July following the footsteps of the Big Ten. Now, a month later, both conferences are also leading the charge in delaying their fall seasons into 2021. 

But, the Pac-12 commissioner also reiterated that this decision is not coming from the conference per se but from health officials that deemed it unsafe to play the current season given the pandemic.

"Emerging Data about health risks, especially the cardiac side effects we don't know about," said Dr. Akerman on the call. 

“The health, safety and well-being of our student-athletes and all those connected to Pac-12 sports has been our number one priority since the start of this current crisis,” said Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott.  “Our student-athletes, fans, staff and all those who love college sports would like to have seen the season played this calendar year as originally planned, and we know how disappointing this is.”

Scott said that the conference cannot put the athletes in a bubble, a method that has allowed the NBA, WNBA, NWSL, MLS, NHL, and PLL all play safely, due to the connectivity between the players and the campus.

"We cannot bubble our student-athletes like pro sports can," said Scott. "We are part of broader campus communities. Student-athletes are living with pure students and on-campus interacting [with them.]"

Scott later stressed that despite already delaying the beginning of the season to September 26, the conference needs more time for the pandemic to get better. That there were too many questions and too much uncertainty to safely play a season this fall.

“We have responsibilities and accountability," said Arizona State Athletic Director Ray Anderson. 

The conference hopes to have a spring college football season, if safe to play. 

Hopefully, it will be. 

[Listen to the latest Talkin’ Ducks Podcast with host Jordan Kent and special guest Oregon women’s basketball head coach Kelly Graves].

[Listen to the latest Talkin' Beavers Podcast with host Ron Callan and special guest former Oregon State women's basketball guard Mikayla Pivec].

Breaking: Pac-12 unanimously cancels 2020 college football, fall sports

Breaking: Pac-12 unanimously cancels 2020 college football, fall sports

The final domino has officially fallen for the 2020 college football season.

COVID-19 continues to spread widely throughout the United States, creating both health and financial complexities surrounding college sports. 

The season has already been disrupted from Division I teams electing for conference-only schedules to Division II and III schools cancelling fall sports championships. The Big Sky Conference is rumored to cancel fall football and the MAC became the first conference to cancel the 2020 football season.  

On Tuesday, within minutes of the Big 10 announcing the cancellation of their fall sports, the Pac-12 followed suit.

[Listen and download for free ‘Sports Uncovered: The uniform craze that revolutionized college football].

The Pac-12 will hold a press conference at 1:30pm Tuesday. 

Throughout this ‘what-if’ and planning season, both Oregon and Oregon State players were adamant about letting their voices be heard and using social media platforms to do just that through the Pac-12’s #WeAreUnited. 

"We love the communities we compete for,” Oregon safety Jevon Holland said in a letter to The Players’ Tribune. “But, we are afraid of the potential ramifications of athletes playing sports before it is adequately safe enough to do so. Our deepest fear is the Pac-12's negligent return to play may result in a member of our Pac-12 family dying due to COVID-19.'"

[RELATED]: Pac-12 ‘will not engage’ in players’ demands of 50% revenue split

According to ESPN, emails between leaders from the Pac-12 #WeAreUnited unity group and conference commissioner Larry Scott “show a stark divide regarding how the parties felt Thursday's initial meeting went in regard to the student group's concerns about the conference's return-to-play policies related to the coronavirus pandemic.”

Now, the players and coaches can continue to focus on their healthy and the safety of others with the ongoing pandemic. 

Perhaps the season will be moved to the spring?

Reminder, the 2021 NFL Draft is set to take place April 29 - May 1, 2021 in Cleveland, Ohio.

[Listen to the latest Talkin’ Ducks Podcast with host Jordan Kent and special guest Oregon women’s basketball head coach Kelly Graves].

[Listen to the latest Talkin' Beavers Podcast with host Ron Callan and special guest former Oregon State women's basketball guard Mikayla Pivec].

REPORT: Pac-12 league presidents will vote Tuesday on 2020 college football season

REPORT: Pac-12 league presidents will vote Tuesday on 2020 college football season

In less than 24 hours, Pac-12 college football fans, players and coaching staff across the conference will finally have the answer they have been looking for.

According to Bruce Feldman of FOX Sports, Pac-12 Athletic Directors met with Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott on Monday night to discuss more on the season ahead.

[Listen and download for free ‘Sports Uncovered: The uniform craze that revolutionized college football].

So far, here’s what we know:

- The players have spoke their minds through several movements on social media: #WeAreUnited and #WeWantToPlay.

- Each Power 5 conference has a different opinion on playing college football in fall.

- The NCAA has left these decisions in the hands of the conference leaders, but has given the players the choice to opt out without penalty of scholarship, eligibility, medical expenses and a hotline to report infractions. 

- Nebraska head coach Scott Frost stated on Monday that the Cornhuskers want to play and are open to “other options” such as playing outside the already designed conference-only schedule.

- The Mountain West canceled all 2020 sports on Monday and are looking to reschedule to spring 2021 as an option.

- UConn became the first FBS team to cancel football in 2020.

- The coronavirus pandemic is continuously spreading.

According to the report from Feldman, the vote is whether to postpone, delay or proceed with the 2020 football season, which could mean a bunch of different scenarios and still no clear path. But at least there will be an answer, right?

[Listen to the latest Talkin' Ducks Podcast with host Jordan Kent and special guest Oregon women's basketball head coach Kelly Graves].

[Listen to the latest Talkin' Beavers Podcast with host Ron Callan and special guest former Oregon State women's basketball guard Mikayla Pivec].

Mountain West Conference cancels football, fall sports in 2020

Mountain West Conference cancels football, fall sports in 2020

Another domino in the 2020 collegiate football world fell on Monday, August 10.

The Mountain West Conference has canceled football along with all other fall sports in 2020.

The conference will look at the 2021 spring sports season as an option. 

Mountain West Commissioner Craig Thompson said in a statement:

I fully understand the impact of this outcome on our student- athletes, coaches, administrators and staff who work so hard daily to play the sports we all love, and I share in their disappointment. We will continue to navigate this pandemic together, overcome the obstacles and return to intercollegiate athletics at the earliest opportunity. — Craig Thompson

[Listen and download for free ‘Sports Uncovered: The uniform craze that revolutionized college football].

The Mountain West conference is comprised of 12 Division I, FBS schools:

MOUNTAIN: Boise State, Air Force, Utah State, Wyoming, Colorado State and New Mexico

WEST: Hawai’i, San Diego State, Nevada, San Jose State, Fresno State and UNLV

Former Oregon Duck offensive coordinator Marcus Arroyo was named the next head coach of the UNLV Rebels after last season’s 2020 Rose Bowl run. Arroyo and the Rebels will have to wait until at least 2021.

According to latest reports, the Power 5 conference leaders are not on the same page in terms of playing in 2020.

[RELATED]: Big-10, Pac-12 to cancel CFB season, players ignite #WeWantToPlay movement

On Monday, Nebraska head coach Scott Frost (former Oregon Duck offensive coordinator) stated that his team is ready to play outside the Big Ten conference

We want to play a Big Ten schedule. I think the only reason we would look at any other options is if for some reason the Big Ten wasn't playing and only a handful of teams from the Big Ten wanted to continue playing. I think if that's the case, I think we're prepared to look at any and all options. — Scott Frost

While rumors are spreading like a wildfire of the 2020 season getting canceled altogether, the players are making one last stand trying to have their voices be heard in what seems like a last ditch effort to salvage the season.

We should know soon enough if the Power 5 conference will follow in the footsteps of the Mountain West.

Report: Nine Oregon Ducks students tested positive for COVID-19

Report: Nine Oregon Ducks students tested positive for COVID-19

James Crepea of The Oregonian reports that Oregon had nine University of Oregon students test positive for the coronavirus back in June according to university documents acquired by the paper. 

The identities of if any were student-athletes is unclear. Originally, Oregonlive had reported that nine student-athletes had tested positive for the virus in June.

Here's what Oregonlive said about the change.

Clerical error and failure to note the athletes’ test results, labeled on the document as “Cases — UO Athletes” and further noting the “athletics testing program,” were actually separate documents and had been redacted, citing state medical privacy law, caused confusion over the chart of results being for athletes and not the university community as a whole

[Listen and download for free ‘Sports Uncovered: The uniform craze that revolutionized college football].

The University of Oregon has refused to release any information regarding the coronavirus and its student-athletes since the beginning of the pandemic while schools such as Oregon State and Clemson were reporting results to the public.

Instead, the University would send out releases stating how many students tested positive weekly.  The school has reported 43 total cases on the Eugene campus since June 12. In June, the university stated that 12 total students had tested positive over that month. 

Just two weeks ago, Oregon head football coach Mario Cristobal went on Fox's Big Noon Kickoff and hinted that the Ducks haven't had a positive test yet for the coronavirus.

"We've been here now a total of seven and a half, coming up on eight weeks and our processes have been flawless. We don't publicly put our results out there but I think the best way to say [it] is that we have been flawless in our processes and our results."

As for those processes in place to keep the student-athletes of Oregon safe, Cristobal said he "can't imagine anyone having anything better out there but we're always researching. We're always digging. We're always looking for information good and bad out there. Anything that can affect us in a positive way. Anything that can help us enhance our processes."

Despite the "flawless" protocol, Cristobal said he and his staff are always trying to better it because the safety of his players is the top priority.

"It's as simple as that. Is it safe or is it not? If it is, then okay, let's try this. And if it's it not, then there's no point," said Cristobal.

When hundreds of Pac-12 football players publicly spoke out against the conference asking for better COVID-19 mandates among other demands, many Oregon football players made sure to say that their demands have nothing to do with the way that Cristobal and the Oregon program has handled the virus.

[RELATED]: Oregon Ducks players praise Mario Cristobal amid #WeAreUnited movement

[Listen to the latest Talkin’ Ducks Podcast with host Jordan Kent]

Report: Big-10, Pac-12 to cancel CFB season, players ignite #WeWantToPlay movement

Report: Big-10, Pac-12 to cancel CFB season, players ignite #WeWantToPlay movement

With what seems like the 2020 Division I collegiate football season hanging by the tiniest thread, the players are making one last ditch effort to save the season and play football in 2020.

Late Sunday evening, several players flooded your social media timeline with a photo of all Power 5 conference logos and the statement:

We all want to play football this season. Establish universal mandated health & safety procedures and protocols to protect college-athletes against COVID-19 among all conferences throughout the NCAA. Give players the opportunity to opt-out and respect their decision. Guarantee eligibility whether a player chooses to play the season or not. Use our voices to establish open communication & trust between players and officials; ultimately create a college football players association. Representative of the players of all power 5 conference.

Of those players sharing this image on social media are likely No. 1 and. No. 2 2021 NFL Draft picks Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence and Ohio State quarterback Justin Fields. These two not opting out of the season and taking a stand to conference commissioners is a big deal:

Also retweeting this statement are current Oregon and Oregon State players such as Jaydon Grant, Thomas Graham Jr. and Bennett Williams.

This movement comes hours after rumors of the season getting pulled at any moment.

[RELATED]: Report: Power 5 Conferences leaning towards cancelling 2020 CFB season

Per ESPN, Power 5 commissioners held an emergency meeting on Sunday due to growing concern that football and other fall sports will not be played due to the COVID-19 virus. 

“It’s gotten to a critical stage," one told SI according to Pat Forde. "I think all of us will be meeting with our boards in the coming days. We have work to do that is no fun.”

Multiple sources told ESPN that a postponement or cancellation seems "inevitable," with speculation that the Big Ten or Pac-12 may be the first to announce.

On Monday morning, Dan Patrick reported via a source that the Big-10 and Pac-12 will cancel their football seasons on Tuesday.

Will the players taking a stand and wanting their voices to be heard make a difference if the conference chairs have already made a decision?

We will know likely sooner rather than later.

Report: Power 5 Conferences leaning towards cancelling 2020 CFB season

Report: Power 5 Conferences leaning towards cancelling 2020 CFB season

The road to the 2020 college football season has been murky ever since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic in March and it appears that road may not lead anywhere, at least this year.

Sports Illustrated's Ross Dellenger reported that sources tell him that the Big Ten is moving toward not playing out the 2020 college football season while in talks with over Power 5 conferences on a "uniform decision."

[Listen and download for free ‘Sports Uncovered: The uniform craze that revolutionized college football].

“It’s gotten to a critical stage," one told SI according to Pat Forde. "I think all of us will be meeting with our boards in the coming days. We have work to do that is no fun.”

Per ESPN, Power 5 commissioners held an emergency meeting on Sunday due to growing concern that football and other fall sports will not be played due to the COVID-19 virus.  

The network reports that the Big Ten, who was the first conference to move to an all-conference football schedule, is ready to pull the plug on the 2020 season and move it to the spring. However, they are talking with the other Power 5 commissioners before announcing their decision unlike when they announced the all-conference schedule which was seen as a rushed decision by conferences such as the SEC. 

The Big Ten presidents didn't vote at Saturday's meeting but will meet again Sunday night.

"It doesn't look good," one Power 5 athletic director told ESPN.

Multiple sources told ESPN that a postponement or cancellation seems "inevitable," with speculation that the Big Ten or Pac-12 may be the first to announce.

"Nobody wanted to be the first to do it," a Power 5 coach told ESPN, "and now nobody will want to be the last."

"It feels like no one wants to, but it's reaching the point where someone is going to have to," another Power 5 administrator added. 

A few weeks after the Pac-12 followed the Big Ten in announcing an all-conference schedule, the conference unveiled a new, ten-game, conference only schedule for each team that will begin on September 26. 

[RELATED]: Oregon Ducks 2020 conference-only college football schedule revealed

However, shortly after, hundreds of players including Oregon safety Jevon Holland and Oregon State cornerback Jaydon Grant released an open letter to their conference via the Player's Tribune titled "#WeAreUnited." 

Inside, they made demands including the ability to receive payments, safety during the coronavirus pandemic, and greater racial justice policies. If the conference decides to not comply, then they threatened to sit out the 2020 college football season.

Twelve of the players later had a call with Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott and other conference officials that at first was reported as "productive" before several players went on the record saying that Scott was "condescending and dismissive of them."

Expect an official announcement to happen sooner than later.

[Listen to the latest Talkin’ Ducks Podcast with host Jordan Kent]