Rapid Reaction: 3 Quick Takeaways from the Trail Blazers loss to the Golden State Warriors in Game 2

Rapid Reaction: 3 Quick Takeaways from the Trail Blazers loss to the Golden State Warriors in Game 2

OAKLAND – Entering Thursday’s Game 2, the Trail Blazers had talked about how they were going to make defensive changes and they also knew they had to knock down open shots.

On Thursday they did just that.

The Trail Blazers cleaned up the mistakes they had made in Game 1 and came out aggressive on the defensive end to make the Warriors more uncomfortable while not getting as many uncontested shots.

In the first half, the Blazers took control of the game, taking a 15-point lead into halftime. Yet, as everyone around the NBA knows the Warriors can score in bunches and quickly. Golden State started the second quarter on a 14-6 run to make it a game again. 

Blazers head coach Terry Stotts went deep into his bench and it worked out in the final quarter, just not enough. It came down to the wire, but the Warriors held onto beat the Blazers, 114-111.  

The series now shifts to Portland.

Golden State Warriors general manager Bob Myers told NBC Sports Bay Area that Kevin Durant (right calf) will not travel with the team to Portland for Games 3 and 4. Durant was re-evaluated on Tuesday night prior to Game 2. He suffered the calf strain in Game 5 of the Warriors and Rockets series.

Final Box Score: Warriors 114, Trail Blazers 111

Here are some quick thoughts from the Blazers Game 2 loss:

1. Blazers change up defensive pick and roll coverage

There were question marks heading into Game 2 regarding what the Blazers were thinking letting their bigs drop back so much and leave Stephen Curry so wide open on the pick and roll. Portland made adjustments in Game 2. The bigs were higher up on the screens not giving so much space and the Blazers were switching off ball screens more often than not. Plus, Portland’s defensive rotation was much quicker on Thursday night.

Portland was playing more aggressive on both ends and the scoreboard reflected it.

Blazers head coach Terry Stotts also put Rodney Hood on either Stephen Curry or Klay Thompson for a majority of the game to put more length on Golden State’s guards.

2. Portland role players step up

Just like in the First Round series against the Thunder, when Damian Lillard drove to the hoop and got caught in traffic, he would kick it out to a wide open Al-Farouq Aminu and Maurice Harkless. And like in that First Round series, Aminu and Harkless hit from outside. The three-point shooting by the Blazers was far better than what they had done just two days prior. Portland set a playoff franchise record with 11 three-pointers in a half.

It says a lot that the Blazers held a 15-point halftime lead after Lillard scored just 10 points in the first half. The Trail Blazers All-Star point guard really didn’t getting going offensively until late in the second quarter.

Seth Curry was also a key piece off the bench for Portland on both ends of the court. When he was on the floor the Blazers were a plus-13.

Enough said.

3. Warriors tighten up in fourth quarter

The game was all tied up at 89 apiece heading into the final period. Coach Stotts went with a rotation change and played Meyers Leonard in the fourth. Leonard and Lillard had a good two-man game going in the final 12 minutes. Golden State also missed lay-ups and open shots. With Portland starting the quarter outscoring the Warriors 13-5, Golden State and Porltand was trading baskets until the end. 

It was almost like the Warriors didn’t know what to do when Leonard was knocking down threes and Seth Curry kept coming up with clutch steals, however, in the end Golden State came up with timely stops and buckets. 

NEXT UP: The Trail Blazers and Warriors will tip-off Game 3 on Saturday night at 6:00pm. You can catch the game on NBC Sports Northwest. Our pregame coverage starts at 5:30pm.

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What went wrong on Portland's wing this year?

What went wrong on Portland's wing this year?

The Portland Trail Blazers had the same fatal flaw this season that they had last season. And the season before that, and the season before that. Damian Lillard and CJ McCollum, embattled by double teams in the playoffs, were better this year at moving the ball before opponents could cause turnovers. But they needed the recipients of those passes — or the recipients of the passes from those passes — to knock down open 3-pointers.

They didn’t.

Portland had a wonderful season, and its strength was largely due to the rise in production by Jusuf Nurkic and the faith its bench unit had in each other. Both of those things were taken away in the postseason. Nurkic sat out with a broken leg, and with Terry Stotts shortening his rotation in the playoffs, the backups looked unsteady.

That put pressure on the Blazers’ high-minute wing players to perform. Moe Harkless, Evan Turner, Rodney Hood, and Al-Farouq Aminu were on the attacking end of plays where imbalances on McCollum and Lillard should have let them dominate. They got more open looks, and were in better positions during these playoffs.

In part, Portland used those gaps in the defense to punish opponents with passing. The ball moved more, particularly to the high post. The nail acted as a pivot point: cutters ran the baseline and collapsing defenders dictated whether a layup or a corner 3-pointer was the best shot available.

Aminu, with his trebuchet-style shooting form, hit just 24 percent of his corner treys, per Cleaning the Glass. Harkless knocked down 14 percent from the same area, an astonishing number. Turner took and hit a single three all postseason.

This resulted in defenses being able to clamp down a bit more on Hood and Seth Curry, the two known quantities as shooters. Portland’s designated bench gunners — both subject to taking above-the-break threes already — were more predictable and thus, easier to guard.

Hood shot 33 percent on non-corner threes, and his stats from deep ranked him in the 59th percentile for the playoffs at his position. Curry put up better numbers, but his game log was uneven. He played heavy minutes for the Blazers in the postseason but in 12 of 16 games played, Curry’s jumper accounted for either one or zero 3-pointers. Without volume, Curry’s effect was limited. With that limitation, Hood had to do the bulk of the bench 3-point scoring. It just wasn’t enough.

That’s without mentioning Turner, whose inability to shoot one again hurt the Blazers. Turner was brought in to relieve trapping pressure from Lillard and McCollum in 2016. It didn't quite go as planned, but this season Turner finally found his niche as the independent leader of the bench unit. That was a positive for the Blazers, but the reason why Turner wasn't able to act as a release valve for Portland’s stars remained.

That takes us back to Aminu and Harkless. The younger forward, who battled nagging injuries all season long, came on strong in the final two months of the year. Although his shooting suffered, he was an effective scorer and his offensive rating jumped in March and April. But Aminu was never a threat, and in the playoffs opponents often allowed him space to shoot so they could prevent Portland from dominating the offensive glass. As Harkless’ percentages in the postseason rounded out, eventually he was left more space, too.

At their core, the Trail Blazers need more wing shooting. They know that — it's why they’ve stuck with Harkless for so long. Where Aminu provides defense and others must make up for his lack of 3-point consistency, Harkless could provide both. He’s shown flashes of brilliance, including during his first season with Portland in 2015-16, when Harkless was exactly the player Neil Olshey wanted in the postseason. The Queens native was able to guard the best opposing wing player while also shooting effectively from 3-point range. He thrived as a cutter. He passed the ball.

This postseason, Portland was forced to revert back to their old ways. Harkless, Aminu, Turner, Curry, and Hood provided one or two skill sets when the Blazers really needed each to give them three or four. Their compartmentalization of tasks laid bare Portland’s biggest flaws, its lack of fluidity apparent when Stotts’ rotation shrank in the postseason.

There's no easy fix for what ails this team. The front office knows exactly what they are trying to get from the wing. This summer will perhaps be their biggest test, with both Harkless and Aminu’s status with the team up in the air. Whether by trade, draft, or free agency, Portland needs a more dynamic wing lineup. It’s now their most glaring weakness, and next season can’t be played with such large disparities created by the trade-offs in roster construction as it’s stood for the past few seasons.

NBC Sports Mock Draft 6.0, will the Trail Blazers keep their pick?

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NBC Sports Mock Draft 6.0, will the Trail Blazers keep their pick?

We are less than a week away from the 2019 NBA Draft!  Now that pre-draft workouts are wrapping up all around the league, the countdown to draft day is on.  With the Pelicans acquiring the Lakers pick (for now?), things are getting very interesting in the middle of the lottery. 

Let's take a look at how we see the NBA Draft going down and who the Trail Blazers might pick at No. 25.  This upcoming field of players has the potential to impact the balance of power in the NBA for many years to come…

No. 1 [Pelicans] -- Zion Williamson, Forward, Duke

Minutes after New Orleans won the draft lottery in May, all the buzz was about the addition of Williamson possibly swaying Anthony Davis to stay in the Big Easy. As it turns out, Davis is now in Hollywood and the Pelicans added a few solid pieces to go along with their prized top pick (not to mention a haul of future draft picks).  Williamson has been talked about for months as the best prospect in this draft class. He’s a 6-7 forward weighing in at 284 lbs who was an extremely entertaining player to watch while his athleticism was on full display while at Duke. Averaging 22.6 points, 8.9 rebounds and 2.1 assists as a first-year player, Williamson led the Blue Devils to the Elite Eight. Now with the Pelicans, he'll be tasked with leading a core of young players including Lonzo Ball, Brandon Ingram and Josh Hart on a playoff hunt in the coming years.

No. 2 [Grizzlies] -- Ja Morant, Point, Murray State

When the first reports broke about Morant undergoing “a minor arthroscopic procedure" on his right knee, the rumors started swirling that Memphis was no longer interested in Morant’s services. However, with Morant’s rehab timeline revealing he should be ready to go in early July, it looks like the Grizzlies will still take him No. 2 overall. Adding fuel to the fire, recent rumors have longtime Grizzly point guard Mike Conley possibly on the trading block, which would make it all the more likely that Morant is the Grizzlies' man.  Morant would be add some flare to the grit-and-grind style in Memphis.  After all, Morant put on a show at Murray State. The 6-3 sophomore excels at getting to the rim. He also easily breaks down defenders with his smooth handles. He is a guard who can get his teammates involved as well.

No. 3 [Knicks] -- RJ Barrett, Forward, Duke

Barrett is a high-energy player, and was Duke’s most consistent scorer. There’s no doubt he will be a high pick on Draft Night, though Barrett will need to work on his ball handling to become more efficient in the half court. The 19-year-old, whose birthday was June 14th, has met with both the Knicks and the Grizzlies. Stay tuned for some possible draft night drama however, if the Knicks don't select Barrett, and he falls into a reunion with his Blue Devil teammate Zion Williamson at the Pelicans 4th overall pick.  FUN FACT: Barrett’s Godfather is former NBA star Steve Nash.

No. 4 [Pelicans from Lakers] -- De’Andre Hunter, Forward, Virginia

We'll start with a disclaimer:  It's very possible, even likely, that the Pelicans trade this freshly-acquired pick.  That being said, if they do make the selection, signs point to De'Andre Hunter.  Hunter is a solid on-ball defender, who has great size and can knock down big shots, as seen in the NCAA Title game with his game tying three-pointer with 12.9 seconds left in regulation. The NABC Defensive Player of the Year, Hunter was matched up on Jarrett Culver all night in a battle of future pros. Hunter held Culver to 5-of-22 from the field and is now a National Champion.  Hunter's shotmaking ability would be a nice compliment to the playmaking ability of the Pelicans' top pick Zion Williamson.

No. 5 [Cavaliers] -- Jarrett Culver, Guard, Texas Tech

Culver has been targeted as a high lottery pick since Texas Tech advanced to the NCAA Championship game. The 6-5 junior picked up his scoring over the last month of the college season, and showed off his versatile offensive game during this past March Madness. Culver has also proven he is an above-average perimeter defender. His jumpshot is still a work in progress, though he would have lots of time to work on that with the rebuilding Cleveland Cavaliers.

No. 6 [Suns] -- Darius Garland, Point Guard, Vanderbilt

Crafty, quick, elite ball handler, with an impressive pull-up off the dribble – these skills all describe Garland. The Vanderbilt Freshman suffered a knee injury back in November that caused him to miss a big chunk of the college basketball season, but scouts have seen enough of his offense to take a chance on him. Garland needs work on the other end of the ball though.

No. 7 [Bulls] -- Coby White, Point Guard, North Carolina

White has proven he has the ability to create shots off the dribble effectively and efficiently. He also has nice size to be able to defend NBA shooting guards. Chicago lacks true star-power at the guard position (and really on the entire roster, to be honest) so White could break into the rotation quickly with the Bulls.

No. 8 [Hawks] -- Cam Reddish, Forward, Duke

Another Duke star, Reddish is a 6-9 freshman and is seen as having big potential. He’s a versatile small forward and has a quick release. Reddish didn’t quite live up to the hype at Duke, but there are still several NBA teams out there that are excited about his potential. Reddish would give the Hawks another big man to put around sophomore guard Trae Young.

No. 9 [Wizards] -- Jaxson Hayes, Forward, Texas

Hayes is a valuable rim protector and a threat to score the ball as well. He averaged 3.8 blocks per 40 minutes while shooting an efficient 72.8 percent from the field. Hayes has all the right physical tools needed for the next level. He has been compared to Nets forward Jarrett Allen.

No. 10 [Hawks from Mavericks] -- Brandon Clarke, Power Forward/Center, Gonzaga

Clarke is on the older end of the spectrum at 22-years-old. The 6-8 big man has been surging up the draft boards after his impressive and gutty performance in the Big Dance. He caught a lot of attention when he scored 36 points in Gonzaga’s 83-71 win over No. 9 seed Baylor in the second round. Clarke was a consistent scorer most of the season, shooting nearly 70% from the field. But, it’s his rim protection and his overall defense that has really turned heads. Clarke averaged 1.2 steals and 3.2 blocks per game this season.

WHAT ABOUT THE TRAIL BLAZERS?

No. 25 [Blazers] -- Admiral Schofield, Small Forward, Tennessee

First and foremost, you have to love a guy named Admiral.  And even better, his brother's name is General.  His family's navy roots aside, Schofield is a rare four-year player in the first round, having improved his stats each season at Tennessee.  The Volunteers had a great season and Schofield showed himself to be a steady outside shooter and a fiery competitor.  Portland worked him out recently and if they don't trade this pick, they may decide to bring him aboard.

 

Download the MyTeams app today for the FULL 2019 First Round Mock Draft  

Throwback to 2012 NBA Draft -- License to Lillard, Episode 1: The Beginning

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Throwback to 2012 NBA Draft -- License to Lillard, Episode 1: The Beginning

Since it’s NBA Draft week, we thought we’d throw it back to when the draft process all began for Trail Blazers' All-Star point guard Damian Lillard.

Lucky for Trail Blazers fans, Nate Jones of Goodwin Sports Management put together a four-part series titled “License to Lillard,” where fans could watch the pre-draft process and get to know the Weber State point guard.

“I’m just dreaming. Pursuing my dream. Follow me on my journey to the NBA,” Lillard said in episode one.

Going to a smaller school at Weber State helped motivate Lillard to prove what he can do.

“I wasn’t recruited by the bigger schools, it just automatically put a chip on my shoulder,” Lillard said.

Portland fans might notice the Oakland native sporting his hometown team, wearing Golden State Warriors basketball shorts while working out. 

Lillard told the story of when he was growing up, he was always working on his game and even though he didn’t have a hoop in his backyard, he did have a basket on a tree at his grandmother’s house that he used often at a young age.

Follow Lillard’s journey training hard, getting stronger, and becoming more explosive before the Trail Blazers took a chance on him in the 2012 NBA Draft.

Also, find out how Lillard overcame breaking his right foot during his junior season (2010-11). Lillard had played in just nine games for the Wildcats before suffering the foot injury that forced him to miss the remainder of the season. He would go on to receive a medical redshirt season. This was his first major injury.

“It was kind of hard on me… I think that helped me get as mentally tough as anyone… Right now I think I can do anything,” Lillard said.

WATCH FULL EPISODE HERE --

License to Lillard, Episode 1: The Beginning

Get to know (and get ready to salute) the Admiral, Admiral Schofield

Get to know (and get ready to salute) the Admiral, Admiral Schofield

According to the dictionary, “Admiral” has two definitions:

- A commander of a fleet or naval squadron, or a naval officer of very high rank.

- A butterfly that has dark wings with bold colorful markings.

Both these definitions are relative when describing Admiral Schofield. 

Imagine a 6’6” 241 pound guard/small forward who has the body of a small truck that’s paired with a silky smooth jump shot. A threat everywhere on the court, literally, everywhere. Baseline to baseline, sideline to sideline. The ability to hit a corner three on one end, block your shot on the other, and then lead a fast break that turns into a ferocious dunk. He’s the guy you want on your team and hate him if he’s not. 

This is Admiral Schofield.

The Tennessee legend, who played all four years in that signature orange color, was a leader since stepping onto the Knoxville campus. In his first season (2015-16), the Vols hired new coach Rick Barnes and finished 15-19 that year, 12th in the SEC conference. Schofield averaged 7.6 points and 4.0 rebounds in just 18.7 minutes per game. The next year, Tennessee improved but not by much, finishing 9th in the SEC with a 16-16 record. By the time Schofield was a junior, his numbers improved all over the court and the Vols found themselves on top of the SEC finishing first in the conference with a 26-9 overall record and going as far as the second round of the NCAA Tournament. Schofield went through the NBA Draft evaluation process after his junior year but ultimately stayed with the Vols for one more season. And boy did he have an impact. Tennessee flirting with the No. 1 overall ranking in NCAA division I men’s basketball all last season, had a deep NCAA Tournament run, and Schofield made himself into quite the NBA prospect: 

- Averaged 16.5 points and shot 42% from three-point range; 

- A finalist for the 2019 Julius Erving Small Forward of the Year Award; 

- 2019 Naismith Trophy Men’s Player of the Year Award Midseason Team;

- A No. 1 Top -10 play on SportsCenter

- 2019 All-SEC First Team (Coaches)

(Just to name a few…)

He was the admiral in Tennessee. 

His style of play is that of “a butterfly with dark wings and bold beautiful markings.” A multi-faceted type of game: not afraid to have the ball in his hands, can overpower you in the paint, but also pull up with a smooth free throw line jumper. But what sets him apart from the rest of the field every time he steps onto the court is his ability to shoot beyond the arc. He is the type of person, not just player, willing to do it all. He has the tenacious mentality to grab an offensive rebound and go right up with it. The in-your-face dark wings with the bold, fearless jump shot butterfly that he is.

This is Admiral Schofield. A guy who can do everything and the little things:

Should the Blazers salute the admiral if he is still on the board at No. 25 on this Thursday’s 2019 NBA Draft? Absolutely. 

 

Get to Know: Talen Horton-Tucker from Iowa State

Get to Know: Talen Horton-Tucker from Iowa State

The Trail Blazers hosted their final round of pre-draft workouts today at the practice facility in Tualatin. Horton-Tucker is a 6’4’’ Guard/Forward from Iowa State. He was an All-Big 12 Honorable Mention and a Big 12 All-Freshman team selection for the 2018-2019 season. He was second among Big 12 freshmen in scoring at 11.8 ppg.

Horton-Tucker’s strengths include a well-balanced combination of power and skill as he is built like a power forward but has skills like a guard but is still working to develop his three point range. Also a benefit, Horton-Tucker has the build and athleticism to guard multiple positions.

Scoop Journal: Who else wished they were partying it up in Jurassic Park on Thursday night?

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NBC Sports Northwest

Scoop Journal: Who else wished they were partying it up in Jurassic Park on Thursday night?

Welcome to The Scoop Journal, where every week I empty my notebook of wide ranging Trail Blazer thoughts, observations, and randomness. I hope you enjoy this light-hearted weekly blog...

June 14, 2019

Dear Scoop Journal,

This is my first journal entry since the Trail Blazers season ended and it seems fitting to write down my random Trail Blazers/NBA thoughts today since the season came to an end last night with the Toronto Raptors taking home the 2019 NBA Championship.

Now that I’ve had a night to sleep on it, with all the injuries for the Warriors, and the celebrations in Toronto, here are my latest Blazers and NBA thoughts:

*Everyone I talk to today, I want to ask them this question: How bad did you wish you were partying it up in Jurassic Park on Thursday night in Toronto? (Toronto knows how to celebrate a championship!)

*First off, Congrats to Toronto and the Raptors fans on earning their first NBA Championship! I know I’m not alone in thinking Blazers fans are happy for their fellow northern neighbors.

*It’s so hard not to think about what it would be like here in Portland for the Blazers to win a title in the modern NBA era. Rip City will go absolutely crazy when the next championship happens here. This is something I think about often. Obviously, I can’t wait for that day!   

*There were so emotions for Golden State fans on Thursday night. It was the last game played at Oracle Arena, the Warriors had just lost Kevin Durant to a ruptured Achilles a couple days before Game 6, and then Klay Thompson goes out with what we all later learned was a torn ACL.

*Injuries are the worst part of the game. You hate to see players go down with these horrific injuries.  

*And not to mention, Thompson and Durant will both become free agents this offseason. This summer is going to be very interesting and next season could now be wide open.  

*I saw a Blazer fan tweet this out on Thursday night and I think this is how every non-Warrior fan was feeling:

*For now, NBA fans wish for a speedy recovery to all the players who went down with major injuries this season.

*Let’s now shift our focus to the NBA Draft. Thursday evening can’t come soon enough. Who will the Blazers pick at No. 25? Or will Portland trade the pick in a package deal? We’re about to find out!

Trail Blazers react to the World Champion Toronto Raptors

Trail Blazers react to the World Champion Toronto Raptors

The 2018-2019 NBA season has come to and end. The Toronto Raptors have dethroned the dynasty that is the Golden State Warriors defeated the Dubs in six games. 

This is the first NBA Championship for the Raptors and "Jurassic Park". 

Several players of the Portland Trail Blazers took to social media following the game to congradulate the World Champs:

The end of this NBA season can only mean that the NBA Draft and the NBA Summer League are just weeks away.

We are about to head into the crazy that is the NBA offseason with so many major players up in free agency. To the Raptors, Kawhi Leonard. For the Warriors, injuries to All-Stars Kevin Durant and now Klay Thompson (ACL tear in game six) will be something to watch next season and what Golden State will do.

CJ McCollum recognized Thompson's heart, coming back into the game and shooting two free throws on a torn ACL.

Outsiders: Will the Blazers actually use the No.25 pick?

Outsiders: Will the Blazers actually use the No.25 pick?

The Blazers have the 25th pick in the 2019 NBA Draft and have already held three pre-draft workouts, but will they actually end up using the pick?

So far the players they have brought in point to no, but workouts don't always tell the story.

Remember the Blazers drafted Zach Collins without ever bringing him in for a workout.

So what will the Blazers do on June 20th? Our Blazers Outsiders discuss in the video above.

Trail Blazers could make a move, but don't expect Anthony Davis

Trail Blazers could make a move, but don't expect Anthony Davis

Now that the season is over and it looks as if the Golden State Warriors are going to have to make a miracle move not to look like a mediocre team next season, the talk turns to the Western Conference and the most basic of questions:

Who’s next?

As the runner-up to Golden State in the playoffs this last season, the Trail Blazers would certainly be a logical choice. And that means there’s pressure on Portland to make the Big Move to push it over the top – something that might duplicate what the Raptors did when they acquired Kawhi Leonard.

And the trade that is being tossed around the most, of course, is for New Orleans’ Anthony Davis. And I would advise those wishing for the Trail Blazers to pull that one off to slow down and be a little more realistic.

The Blazers would probably be willing to go all-in on Davis but they just don’t have the chips to tempt the Pelicans. Or, more correctly, other teams have more to offer.

And let me say first, if you think the Trail Blazer brass hasn’t already thought of this and hasn’t already engaged in some discussions with New Orleans, you’re probably off base. I would assume by now a whole lot of teams have not only knocked on David Griffin’s door, but have been rebuffed.

There’s a reason the Lakers continue to be the most-talked-about destination for Davis. No, not LeBron -- although that's certainly a factor in Davis wanting to be there. They have the most to offer. Los Angeles could send the Pels two previous No. 2 picks in the draft along with the current No. 4 pick – as well as Kyle Kuzma. The Blazers would be offering high-salaried players who could provide cap room in one more year but I would also assume a team welcoming Zion Williamson doesn't want to think about cap space NEXT year.

It wants talent now.

So if Davis doesn’t land in Portland it doesn’t mean the team didn’t give it a shot. Those guys in the front office know exactly what’s out there for them in the West and are more excited about that prospect than you are.

And I do think the Trail Blazers will pull something off – and it will probably prove to be better than you thought it was going to be. That’s the way a lot of Neil Olshey’s moves have turned out over the last several seasons.

Who could they get? I have no idea. But I certainly didn’t know Jusuf Nurkic and a pick could be had for Mason Plumlee – and I had no idea Nurk would prove to be the player he’s become. I also didn’t expect Rodney Hood and Enes Kantor to show up here for the stretch run last season.

Olshey’s plan all along has been to prepare this franchise for the time when the Warriors drop off. The Warriors didn’t just drop off, though, they fell down in a heap due to injuries.

But the Blazers are closer to a Western Conference title now than they’ve been in a long time. Damian Lillard and CJ McCollum are in their prime and Jusuf Nurkic – when they get him healthy – is a force at both ends of the court.

Portland could still use more three-point shooting and a rim protector until Nurkic heals and to back him up after that.

You can play with one of those online digital trade machines all you want, but I’m not sure you really know which players to plug into it.

So my best advice would be to be patient and see what happens.