Seahawks

Quandre Diggs reveals he intends to change Seahawks jersey number

Seahawks

Let the jersey number change fun begin.

Now that the NFL has revised its numbering rules, Quandre Diggs is prepared to switch his jersey number up.

In a recent podcast with Michael-Shawn Dugar and Christopher Kidd of The Athletic, the Seattle Seahawks safety shared that he had been planning to change his jersey number before the new rule changes went into effect.

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But with the NFL now expanding jerseys and allowing defensive backs to pick from any number between 1 and 49, Diggs plans to ditch the No. 37, and he has a good reason for doing so.

"As you guys know, my brother (and former NFL DB) Quentin Jammer, he wore (No. 6),” Diggs explained. “So, I always kind of wore it to honor him at every level of football I played, from little league to middle school to high school to college. Now in the league, this is the first time that I'll be able to honor him.

 

“Before (the NFL) did the number change deal, I was going to switch to 23 to honor him for his career in San Diego (with the Chargers). Then when they did the number change I hit him up and asked 'What number you think would be best, 6 or 23?' He was like 'I think 6 would be clean.”

Diggs and Jammer both donned the No. 6 when playing college ball at Texas, but upon being traded to the Seahawks in 2019, Diggs inherited the No. 37. Now that the loosened jersey number rules are in place, Pro Bowl safety can revert back to his college number once again.

But the number change will come at a cost. Under the NFL’s current jersey manufacturing rules, Diggs will have to buy out the existing allotment of jerseys featuring his number. However, if Diggs wants to wait until 2022 to don the No. 6, there would be no requirement to buy out the inventory.

Along with Diggs, players like Jalen Ramsey and Robert Woods of the Los Angeles Rams could see new numbers next season. Previously, only quarterbacks, punters and kickers could wear single-digit numbers.